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Discovered A Huge Honey Bee Hive By My House

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posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: PraetorianAZ
If you do decide to move them do it after winter. If you move them now they will prob not have enough time to gather food for the winter and they will die.

Here in AZ a buddy of mine is a bee keeper and he posts on CL all time time for free bee removal. He will go in box the entire colony and take them home for his hives. He has about 11 right now and sells his honey online. Check there for local beekeepers who are looking to expand.


I won't even consider moving them until after next Spring.
Frankly, I feel kind of fortunate to have them with us.




posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Its not surprising that you have not been stung as they would recognize you but strangers should be cautious . They should be fine without your help but a sign warning people might be a good idea . I would think if its a large hive they would split .Keep a eye out for a swarm collecting in the neighbourhood and keep a phone # of someone to catch them if it happens . bees be good :>)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: IAMTAT

Its not surprising that you have not been stung as they would recognize you but strangers should be cautious . They should be fine without your help but a sign warning people might be a good idea . I would think if its a large hive they would split .Keep a eye out for a swarm collecting in the neighbourhood and keep a phone # of someone to catch them if it happens . bees be good :>)


Thanks. I've been here two years and never stung. My deck is about 20 ft. from their hive and they just enjoy the flowers we put out there...never go after us or our dogs.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Ok, I will check in tonight.
Cheers



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT


Could you take a picture of it?



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Bees are good....
I'd leave them be, but natural predators will do what they do. Mice can get into their combs during the winter when they are asleep and eat all their honey, then in the spring when they wake up they have nothing to eat. and their honeycombs are decimated.

and birds of the flycatcher family can be a nuisance to them too.

Sooner or later the colony will divide, and if you end up with a ball of bees at your door you will want someone to come get them.

My boss just started some hives this summer, I'll ask him for you. I know we are close. and if he isn't that advanced yet I'm sure he knows who is.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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originally posted by: Mousygretchen
a reply to: IAMTAT


Could you take a picture of it?





I've never tried to put a photo here...maybe my wife can.
It's just a vertical split in a large living tree...about 6-7 feet long. I can't get too close to see far inside...but from about 7 ft. away I can't see anything inside the crack, but bees.
Many, many bees are flying in and out of the crack constantly.

edit on 22-9-2016 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: horseplay

Thank you.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
Does anyone have any advice?


Leave them be. DO NOT be conned into having them exterminated, or moved. An established colony is a lucky thing to have. Live with them and be thankful.

That's my advice, as a beekeeper myself.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi

originally posted by: IAMTAT
Does anyone have any advice?


Leave them be. DO NOT be conned into having them exterminated, or moved. An established colony is a lucky thing to have. Live with them and be thankful.

That's my advice, as a beekeeper myself.


Thanks.
Extermination was never an option.
I am happy they're here...just want to keep them safe.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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Bee Tree,

sweet!

I've seen a lot of them in Wash state, big hollow cedars often hold hives.

I raided a hive 20+ years ago, it was in my shops wall, did good as I was not stung - rain gear and smoked the hive. It was the bear in me lol's!



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 03:18 PM
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We had some honey bee's settle in our old chimney pot here in blighty, called the council out and all we did was block off the bottom of that stack with some plastic covering so they wouldn't enter the house and after a while they moved on and the 'pest control officer' who came said you generally can sit by the nests if you are careful without getting stung...

We'd of loved to of got them out but the structural damage would of meant too much but they did leave on their own steam and as such i'm happy

You do not want to see the size of the wasps nest they kept in the offices as it must of been a 6-7ft ball ....run...run away if you'd had that in your loft.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT


I know how it is...I use to be fascinated watching them when I was young.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

1. Don't use pesticides
2. Plant a garden next spring with some flowering veggies like peas and beans
3. DON'T BUY NON-LOCAL HONEY!!! Honey actually can be a transport vessel for biological threats (viruses and bacteria) that only affect bees. Your local bees may not have developed the same immunities as the bees that made commercial honey thousands of miles away.
4. Bees need water! You should make a small watering hole for them that isn't right at their hive, but also not too far away. 100-yards distance is perfect if you can get it. This water needs to be drinking water, as chemicals put into swimming pools isn't healthy for the bees.
5.Plant clover. Bees adore clover and it blooms constantly through the summer.
6. Consider buying a bee box or establishing another hollow dead tree a couple hundred yards from the hive. Next Spring you may end up with two thriving colonies when one of the queen bees picks the new home as a good candidate for a new hive.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:25 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Be careful what you spray, if needed, and when. Otherwise, enjoy! Perhaps some flowers they can visit, would be nice. Always like having bees around, myself.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

Pretty much what my bud said..only reason to move them would be if the hive was out on a limb, and wouldn't survive winter. You can pick up a few bee box's in the meantime and the colony will probably spread out.
Fun fact: A queen will live about 5 years.



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