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Opera Browser With Built-In VPN Now Available To All Users

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posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 09:46 AM
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Opera is officially the first web browser developer to offer a limitless virtual private network (VPN) baked in its software, and it does so for no extra charge.

Source

Website: Link

For those wondering what a VPN actually is,


A virtual private network, also known as a VPN, is a private network that extends across a public network or internet. It enables users to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if their computing devices were directly connected to the private network.

This is good news for those that want a quick and easy way to increase their privacy and avoid potential geoblocking from their ISP. VPNs are designed to help the user remain “anonymous” on the internet, while also giving you access to a larger and less tailored experience.

Developer versions of the browser have incorporated a VPN in the past, but this is the first official release on PC. Android and iOS users can take advantage of the free service as well. It’s worthy to note that Opera’s browsers come with a built-in ad blocker and battery saver.


We've tested the software and it's quick and easy to use. To activate it, just head to Preferences or Settings in the browser, go to Security & Privacy, and check the box marked "Enable VPN." You can click the VPN logo in the browser's address bar to monitor your data usage and change which country you're routing your traffic through. (Choices are limited to the US, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, and Singapore.) However, if you were hoping to, say, watch a bit of US Netflix from outside the country, don't bother — the video streaming service has already blocked Opera's proxies.

The desktop browser’s VPN services are unlimited and have no time or data restrictions. At the moment, Opera only allows users to set up five different global locations, compared to other browsers that only offer a wide variety of country-based locations.

To combat any confusion, the browser can gauge the best server location in order to achieve the best network speed and server capacity. Another worthwhile function of Opera 40 is that it plays nice with Google’s Chromecast, allowing you to stream the browsers display to any compatible device.

I hope this helps some of our members who refuse to deal with complicated setups and/or want to avoid subscription fees to get similar service and reliability. I’m at work and haven’t tested the browser myself, but will be doing so later. Any user feedback in the meantime would be appreciated.

Happy surfing!


edit on 22-9-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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Do be aware the VPN doesn't have exceptional bandwidth so don't be surprised if it goes slow



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:27 AM
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There will be a crapload of traffic going through their VPN servers, and all for free? Hmm makes you wonder if they have an ulterior motive.

edit on 22-9-2016 by BlueShaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:44 AM
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Thanks for the info!



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:53 AM
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originally posted by: Maxatoria
Do be aware the VPN doesn't have exceptional bandwidth so don't be surprised if it goes slow

I understand how that could be an issue, but the "average" user is mostly unaware of the many variables that could potentially decrease the speed and reliability of their internet connection. Simply being on a congested channel can severely hinder a router's speed.

For what it's worth, I found this...


As far as I can tell the VPN feature works perfectly fine. I’m able to maintain high Internet speeds (aside from my poor ping), browse and watch HD videos with no noticeable slowdowns in performance. From checking geolocation and IP tracking, the VPN also seems to be doing a good job of not showing where I actually am. I can’t verify if it’s hiding my traffic from my ISP or not, but from what I’m able to see it is. If nothing else, it’s certainly more secure than using an unrouted connection. Using Opera’s VPN service on public WiFi would likely add some security benefits, for instance.

Link


originally posted by: BlueShaman
There will be a crapload of bandwidth going through their VPN servers, and all for free? Hmm makes you wonder if they have an ulterior motive.

The point you made is valid, especially for ATS. Usually, the first question that comes to mind when services like this are offered to the public for free is, how are they going to pay for that? Also, why would they decide to make it free?

I searched briefly and came to my own conclusion that using the browser will introduce more advertisements related to Opera and it's affiliates to help generate revenue. I'll look into it more when I get home.

Another tip for users...

How do you bring over all your Chrome extensions to Opera?


Install this extension, and then you can grab them right off the Chrome Web Store. addons.opera.com...

It works because modern Opera is Chromium-based. I recommend using Opera Developer if you want good benefits, btw.

And yeah, passwords/bookmarks/etc is all automatically imported from Chrome. Getting your bookmarks bar requires messing around in bookmark manager though.


edit on 22-9-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 11:14 AM
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What about the traffic that doesn't go through the browser?



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 11:40 AM
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Did you read the redit post?
My concern is VPN log info.

www.reddit.com...



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 11:45 AM
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All your IP information and traffic will be logged on their servers. They will have massive amounts of data collected by everyone who uses this.

A VPN service is only as good as the company, and their ethics, that is operating it.

My guess is the information will either be readily available for sale to advertisers, or at worst, a nameless shell company operating for the benefit of some 3 letter(directly or indirectly) will be the one to benefit from this information.
edit on 22-9-2016 by MisterSpock because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Pretty nifty thanks. I have used Opera in the past but will try it again and check out the new stuff. One thing I have noticed in using other VPN's is that it seems to really slow down the connection. I am not sure if this is the case for all VPN's or just some.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 11:56 AM
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Would be cool if they offered an anonymous email service too, finding a good email server is so hard these days.




posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: iTruthSeeker
One thing I have noticed in using other VPN's is that it seems to really slow down the connection. I am not sure if this is the case for all VPN's or just some.

Yes your connection slows down somewhat when using just about any VPN. How much it slows down depends on the number of users connected to the server and what they're doing. If a few of them are streaming HD videos, downloading torrents etc, it can get pretty damn slow. When that happens you can try connecting to a different server/location to see if things speed up.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: Dumbass
What about the traffic that doesn't go through the browser?

It depends on the VPN configuration. In order to find out if some or all traffic is routed through your VPN, you'll have to check your default gateway. Assuming that you have some ability, open a command prompt, preferably with admin rights.

Windows (in command prompt)

route print

Linux (in console)

netstat -nr

OS X (not sure)

netstat -nr

Look for network destination 0.0.0.0 (win) or default (linux). I'm not sure about OS X. If it's set to your local subnet gateway, all traffic is NOT going through your VPN. Any other case, all traffic IS going through your VPN.

edit on 22-9-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:44 PM
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I wonder if they are going to block China from using this service. I can already imagine several million chinese surfers trying to use Opera's free VPN all at once to bypass the Great Firewall of China.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

I will read the material presented in more detail shortly, but I have a quick question. Just wondering if you know if flash works on it? It's been a while since I used any proxy or vpn browsers but the ones I messed around with did not work very well with flash.

I'd try it out now but I'm at work.

Regards.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: DigitalVigilante420
a reply to: eisegesis

I will read the material presented in more detail shortly, but I have a quick question. Just wondering if you know if flash works on it? It's been a while since I used any proxy or vpn browsers but the ones I messed around with did not work very well with flash.

I'd try it out now but I'm at work.

Regards.

Adobe Flash goes crawling back to Linux for some security

(September 6, 2016)


Yes, Adobe has announced that it is to resume support of Flash for Linux after going to splitsville with the platform in 2012. The company was still offering security updates, but these were due to stop in 2017.

But now, in an altogether weird move, a new beta build has appeared, Flash 23 for Linux, and the company has admitted that “in the past, we communicated that NPAPI Linux releases would stop in 2017. This is no longer the case."


NPAPI plug-ins have been pulled from Internet Explorer and Google Chrome in favour of a safer PPAPI version used in Chromium-based browsers like Chrome (natch) and Opera, but both will be available on Linux aimed largely at default Firefox users.

The NPAPI version won't have as many of the advanced features, DRM for example, meaning that watching TV streams is out of the question. GPU acceleration will limit gaming potential and generally the whole thing seems like going through the motions a bit. But at least it's not alone.

The official announcement said: "Today we are updating the beta channel with Linux NPAPI Flash Player by moving it forward and in sync with the modern release branch (currently version 23). We have done this significant change to improve security and provide additional mitigation to the Linux community."

Short answer: Yes. Flash is now more compatible than ever.


edit on 22-9-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 02:07 PM
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originally posted by: eisegesis

originally posted by: Dumbass
What about the traffic that doesn't go through the browser?

It depends on the VPN configuration. In order to find out if some or all traffic is routed through your VPN, you'll have to check your default gateway. Assuming that you have some ability, open a command prompt, preferably with admin rights.

Windows (in command prompt)

route print

Linux (in console)

netstat -nr

OS X (not sure)

netstat -nr

Look for network destination 0.0.0.0 (win) or default (linux). I'm not sure about OS X. If it's set to your local subnet gateway, all traffic is NOT going through your VPN. Any other case, all traffic IS going through your VPN.


I wasn't asking about VPN in general, but obviously I might have been more clear about that.
Opera for desktops only provides VPN for the browser itself, well that is what their site states, it connects your browser to a VPN server. For android and so it connects all your traffic towards that server.

I wonder how it is organized, do they have a network lock in case the connection was interrupted?

My router handles my VPN (among other things =P), so whatever device is connected it runs through it unless I made the exception. So i wont try opera out for now. I just don't like it when people think they're safe, while they don't know the whole story.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Thank you.

Certainly looks like a worthy download.

One of the online browser games I play is making it hard for people in the same household to participate due to IP restrictions so this might be an easy work around compared to the others I have been implementing.



ETA:

Please disregard my drunken U2U a while back, I was out of line - my sincere apologies

edit on 22-9-2016 by DigitalVigilante420 because: off topic apology



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock
Would be cool if they offered an anonymous email service too, finding a good email server is so hard these days.



Hard to find somewhere physically to store the emails that doesn't have nasty laws allowing them to read all your stuff at basically a whim.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: Dumbass


Opera for desktops only provides VPN for the browser itself, well that is what their site states, it connects your browser to a VPN server. For android and so it connects all your traffic towards that server.

Correct. I should have been more clear as well. The desktop software is a browser VPN only, whereas the Android app is separate from Opera's browser app and provides VPN functionality for the entire system, including other apps.

There was a vulnerability back in April that allowed your IP address to be leaked while using the developer version, which I'm assuming has been fixed for this official release. If not, there is a workaround.

Block Opera VPN from leaking your IP address


Considering that WebRTC can be used by sites to identify you even if you are using a VPN or proxy, you may want to disable the technology especially if you don't make use of it at all.

Opera does not ship with built-in options to disable WebRTC, but you may install a browser extension that handles WebRTC leaks in the browser and improves your privacy while using Opera's built-in VPN or system-wide VPN solutions.

WebRTC Leak Prevent

The developer mentioned last April,


Our VPN feature is still in development. We are currently working hard to implement support for proxying even more of the browser traffic, including WebRTC and plug-ins. Having this functionality built into the browser, instead of as an extension, allows us to catch more situations, such as certificate revocation checks made by the system.

WebRTC and browser plug-in traffic were not able to be "privatized" with earlier versions of the VPN, but I think it's safe to assume that the issue has been addressed. It's unlikely that the developer would announce an official release without doing so.


I just don't like it when people think they're safe, while they don't know the whole story.

The key word is safer. Opera makes it so easy, that most people who don't use or are afraid to setup a VPN, can at least drastically improve their security while surfing the internet. Circumventing the ISP's desire to geoblock your IP is enough of a reason for some.

edit on 22-9-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: Fisherr
Did you read the redit post?
My concern is VPN log info.

www.reddit.com...

Your link is from April regarding an unofficial, early developer's build.

See below...


originally posted by: MisterSpock
All your IP information and traffic will be logged on their servers. They will have massive amounts of data collected by everyone who uses this.

Please do not spread disinformation.

With that said, you'll have to take their word for it.



Opera's integrated VPN is 'no-log', meaning that your surfing activities are not logged in any form, and it offers 256-bit AES encryption to keep your communications secure.

Links: 1/2

edit on 22-9-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



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