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NASA to Announce 'Surprising' Europa Discovery Monday

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posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: skyblueworld

NASA discovered Geysers on Europa in 2013 but then they disappeared , it's possible they may be back.

In December 2013, researchers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope announced that they had spotted evidence of geysers blasting into space from Europa's south polar region
www.space.com...


If they have rediscovered them it would be a lot easier to sample the water of Europa using the geysers than drilling through the ice.


edit on 21-9-2016 by gortex because: link




posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: skyblueworld

NASA discovered Geysers on Europa in 2013 but then they disappeared , it's possible they may be back.

In December 2013, researchers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope announced that they had spotted evidence of geysers blasting into space from Europa's south polar region


If they have rediscovered them it would be a lot easier to sample the water of Europa using the geysers than drilling through the ice.


Yes. One of the things that makes Saturn's Moon Enceladus a very tempting target for a mission is that the water and organic compounds from its ocean is sprayed into space by Enceladus' geysers, making it relatively easy to collect a sample of that water and those organic compounds.

Europa is not known to have such geysers, and if it doesn't, the water on Europa would be more difficult to collect (perhaps only via drilling through the ice). However, having a relatively easier way to collect a sample would make Europa a more desirable target for such a mission -- especially considering that Jupiter is much closer to Earth than Saturn is to Earth(Earth-Jupiter closest distance=4.2 AU, farthest 6.2 AU. Earth-Saturn closest distance = 11 AU, farthest 13 AU).

However, another thing that makes Saturn's moon Enceladus a tempting target is that complex organic molecules (not life, but the building blocks of life) have already been detected in the water spewing from Enceladus. Europa's water seems that it potentially contains the organic building blocks of life, but it has not yet been positively confirmed.

solarsystem.nasa.gov...
www.cnet.com...#!

Water vapor emanating from Europa discovered back in 2013 has given more hope to the idea that Europa's' water may be relatively easy to access, and as you indicated, perhaps THAT is the scientific finding they will be discussing.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

2010..DIS..Gusting sir...
Maybe the monolith we always hear of.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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originally posted by: EvillerBob

originally posted by: neoholographic
Is this just hype or could this be an announcement related to life?


NASA will announce new findings about Jupiter's ocean-harboring moon Europa during a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT) on Monday (Sept. 26).

"Astronomers will present results from a unique Europa observing campaign that resulted in surprising evidence of activity that may be related to the presence of a subsurface ocean on Europa," NASA officials wrote in a media advisory Tuesday (Sept. 20).


www.space.com...

The internet is buzzing that this "suprising activity" could be related to life.


I thought we promised to attempt no landings there?


No, we were TOLD to attempt no landings there, but tried anyway. Strangely, every probe making the attempt was destroyed.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: halo0verhorns
Why keep us waiting? What are they formulating?

The delay could just be simple things like needing to finish the actual presentations. Or needing to rent out a place to hold the press conference while giving reporters time to fit it into their schedules.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 11:36 PM
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originally posted by: skyblueworld
Hydrothermal vents on Europa would cool. On Earth vents are teeming with life, regardless of whether the water is acidic or alkaline - doesn't matter.


Good thought. Access to the liquid water under the thick, THICK ice is the key impediment to a real sampling mission. If they've located regions of thinner ice or even sporadically clear of ice it would be significant.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 11:39 PM
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originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: skyblueworld
Hydrothermal vents on Europa would cool. On Earth vents are teeming with life, regardless of whether the water is acidic or alkaline - doesn't matter.


Good thought. Access to the liquid water under the thick, THICK ice is the key impediment to a real sampling mission. If they've located regions of thinner ice or even sporadically clear of ice it would be significant.


Aren't they also considering sampling from one of the fresh fissures in hopes the up-welling brings with it any evidence of life below?



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:21 AM
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a reply to: neoholographic

Are they finally going to admit that the rust staining on the surface is from bacterial growth?

Or are they going to let us down again with boring data?



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:47 AM
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Gothmog:

NASA" - We have received a message :

"ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS EXCEPT EUROPA
ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE
USE THEM TOGETHER
USE THEM IN PEACE"

(2001 a Space Odyssey).


Wouldn't that be something? The implications would be benignly astonishing!



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: BIGPoJo

How is data concerning another world "boring"?

It's another world for cryin' out loud. With all the possibilities that entails. Life? Maybe. Strange new mineral compounds that could change our lives? Maybe. Or something else entirely? Also possible.

It's anything but boring.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 08:16 AM
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originally posted by: BIGPoJo
a reply to: neoholographic

Are they finally going to admit that the rust staining on the surface is from bacterial growth?

Or are they going to let us down again with boring data?


They would need to have clear knowledge that the ruddy red marks are in fact bacteria before they could "admit" that it is bacteria. And since they have not yet been able to sample those streaks, I'd say they do not yet have the knowledge as to what they are.

They can speculate that it might be life (and some at NASA have speculated about that possibility), but that would not be "admitting". To Admit something, that mean that you first need to posses the specific knowledge that you are "admitting". Speculation is not knowledge.

However, if you are saying that they should admit to the possibility that the ruddy red markings could be bacteria, then NASA has already done that. However, a explanation with more evidence/scientific understanding to back it up is that they are possibly salt water from the oceans finding its way to the surface (through leaching or through cracks) and then having the salts being turned red due to the intense radiation that bombards Europa's surface.

edit on 2016-9-22 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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To add to my post above:

NASA is pretty excited about the possibly of life on places such as Europa, Enceladus, and Titan (among other places). NASA astrobiologist Chris McKay has been a propoenent of a mission to either Europa or Enceladus that could gather a sample of water for detailed analysis -- or even as part of a sample return mission. He has said in the past the the organic molecules from Encelaus are being spewed into space and are just waiting for us to come and grab it in search for life.

A Perspective on Life on Enceladus: A World of Possibilities

Looking for Life on Saturn's Moon Enceladus: Send a Flyby or Lander?


He is also a proponent of the possibility that some readings of inbalances of certain chemical compounds on Titan could indicate signs of life.

What is Consuming Hydrogen and Acetylene on Titan?


They also feel Europa is a good candidate for life under the surface, and are in the planning stages for possible missions to Europa to look for life. This article (below) discusses potential missions, and it also discusses water vapor that the Hubble Telescope discovered above Europa in 2012.

I think that's what this media conference is about -- I think they may have used the Hubble telescope and other data to identify geyser-like plumes coming from Europa. Having the deep-ocean water from Europa being spewed into space by geysers would make a Europa water analysis mission much more feasible (cost effective) because the water would be easier to access.

Potential Future Europa Flyby Mission



edit on 2016-9-22 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:19 AM
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I am pretty sure i saw a scientific source tweet yesterday mentioning the presence of something that looks like "clouds" over the ice surface. Would these be methane? no atmosphere for water clouds and too frigid anyway at the surface.
edit on 22-9-2016 by kountzero because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-9-2016 by kountzero because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: kountzero
I am pretty sure i saw a scientific source tweet yesterday mentioning the presence of something that looks like "clouds" over the ice surface. Would these be methane? no atmosphere for water clouds and too frigid anyway at the surface.


Was that possibly the vapor I mentioned above? That vapor was found by the Hubble telescope in 2012, and could indicate the presence of plumes or geysers of water erupting through Europa's icy surface from the sub-surface ocean.

Hubble Sees Evidence of Water Vapor at Jupiter Moon


edit on 2016-9-22 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: nightbringr

originally posted by: BrianFlanders
It's just NASA being NASA. They have to be announcing some kind of "exciting possibility" at least once a month to justify their funding and existence. They've been doing this trick for as long as I can remember. Although they've gotten more brazen in recent years with announcing things that sound more exciting than they are.


It used to be that just announcing that a comet was going to hit Jupiter was cool enough to get people interested and excited.

You're kidding, right?



Of course. I'm always kidding when I state my opinions.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 06:31 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People..... NASA astrobiologist Chris McKay has been a propoenent of a mission to either Europa or Enceladus that could gather a sample of water for detailed analysis --


Chris has been a buddy of mine for almost 40 years. But I still suggested the Enceladus geyser-diving mission first:

www.nbcnews.com...-RpSK1vy-c



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 06:39 PM
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'impossible' cloud found on titan



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: AndyFromMichigan
I don't know whether it's NASA or the media or both, but yeah NASA discoveries tend to be wildly over-hyped. It's likely to be something that's scientifically interesting, but really not a big deal to the average person.


That is a good point, and true enough. Would it not be great if the "average" person was more in tune to science?
It is interesting how so many take these wonderful discoveries with such little regard. The discoveries are really not so
over-hyped when you consider the incredible technology that is providing the only way you would ever see such things.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 02:49 AM
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Re: www.express.co.uk...

It's "surprising activity" that caught my eye. I don't recall NASA using that term before when announcing a major press conference. Maybe sounds of life, or old fossilized vehicle tracks in the soil? Nah.. I won't get my hopes up like that!



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 04:04 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
NASA" - We have received a message :
"ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS EXCEPT EUROPA
ATTEMPT NO LANDING THERE
USE THEM TOGETHER
USE THEM IN PEACE"

(2001 a Space Odyssey )


Nope. This is from 2010: The Year We Make Contact, the sequel to 2001. Its not as groundbreaking as 2001, but its a decent enough flick and whenever Europa is brought up, I'm reminded about it.







 
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