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Bold Choices for Songs

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posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 09:20 PM
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Can you think of a situation where a solo artist or a band put their credibility and/or popularity on the line by writing a song about a topic that is shunned by society?

"Californication" by Red Hot Chili Peppers mentions a lot of different conspiracy theories. The song is obviously all about a conspiracy theory, and the many ways that it manifests in our lives. I listened to the song recently and it struck that it's a very bold stance for a band to take. In a culture that demonizes "conspiracy theorists", it's very brave for a band to make a song all about conspiracy theories.


www.youtube.com...
edit on 20-9-2016 by Profusion because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: Profusion

The song is at least 15 years old I guess. My understanding was always it´s a kind of call out to the hollywood way and other social deteriorations. Like the pregnant giving a BJ, if I remember.

How do you get conspiracy theory out of this?



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 09:59 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: Profusion

The song is at least 15 years old I guess. My understanding was always it´s a kind of call out to the hollywood way and other social deteriorations. Like the pregnant giving a BJ, if I remember.

How do you get conspiracy theory out of this?


If "Californication" is being pushed consciously around the world (as the song claims) then it's a conspiracy. Therefore, the song presents a conspiracy theory. The song lays out the different aspects of the conspiracy (and each aspect is a different conspiracy in itself).



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: verschickter




My understanding was always it´s a kind of call out to the hollywood way and other social deteriorations. Like the pregnant giving a BJ



How is that social deteriorations [sic]?



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:05 PM
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Bold Choices for Songs




edit on 20-9-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: Profusion

But it's not really about conspiracies. Part of the song is just something Anthony Keidis heard some woman screaming in the street somewhere "psychic spies from China". A lot of the other lyrics are inspired by his life living with his partying father in LA ie plastic surgery, aging starlets, porn. Another piece was inspired by murdered (not a conspiracy, just a straight up crazy murder/suicide) Playmate Dorothy Stratten.

All these things are less conspiracy and more typical stream of consciousness song writing that Keidis is known for.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

This type of argument really bothers me. When a band releases a song, only the hardcore fans will care if there's a backstory to why the song was written a certain way. Here are some good examples:

15 Famous Songs With Misunderstood Meanings

"Imagine" by John Lennon was described by him as "virtually the Communist manifesto"?

"Just Like Heaven" by The Cure is "about hyperventilating—kissing and falling to the floor"?

"The One I Love" by REM was described by one of the band members as "savagely anti-love"?

Only hardcore fans are going to care about those things. The rest of us have to deal with the explicit meanings of the songs.

My interpretation of "Californication" by Red Hot Chili Peppers fits the explicit meaning of the lyrics.
edit on 20-9-2016 by Profusion because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:43 PM
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a reply to: Profusion

But you don't have to deal with the "explicit" meaning of the songs, especially older songs like Californication. All the information is out there somewhere for you to research.

I get the meaning behind your thread, and there are definitely songs that threatened or ended the careers of musicians, but Californication wasn't one of them.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:52 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Profusion

But you don't have to deal with the "explicit" meaning of the songs, especially older songs like Californication. All the information is out there somewhere for you to research.


You expect people to research the story behind every song they listen to? I could spend the rest of my life doing that, and I couldn't finish that task. I'm stunned by your suggestion.

That's why I'm saying only hardcore fans of a particular musical act will do it. I can't recall seeking out the back story to the meaning of a song in my life. What's the point? Why would anyone do that? I think you have to be obsessed to do it.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: Profusion

You have to be something as well to just apply your own meaning to a song and advance the idea that it might have harmed a musical acts career.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Profusion

You have to be something as well to just apply your own meaning to a song and advance the idea that it might have harmed a musical acts career.


Nowhere did I even imply that "Californication" "might have harmed [Red Hot Chili Peppers] career." I wrote:

Can you think of a situation where a solo artist or a band put their credibility and/or popularity on the line by writing a song about a topic that is shunned by society?

It's clear to me that they took a risk, and it paid off for them. You won't find me implying that the song harmed their career. I don't believe that at all.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 11:08 PM
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"Can you think of a situation where a solo artist or a band put their credibility and/or popularity on the line by writing a song about a topic that is shunned by society? "

...how is this not the same thing as saying releasing the song might have harmed their career?



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 11:13 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
"Can you think of a situation where a solo artist or a band put their credibility and/or popularity on the line by writing a song about a topic that is shunned by society? "

...how is this not the same thing as saying releasing the song might have harmed their career?


The phrase "on the line" means that something was risked. It doesn't imply any particular result from the risk.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 11:13 PM
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The Dixie Chicks come to mind if I'm reading the question right..?

CNN quote
"Music superstars the Dixie Chicks are finding out that criticizing President Bush's plans for war in Iraq can cost you air play, big time.

Country stations across the United States have pulled the Chicks from playlists following reports that lead singer Natalie Maines said in a concert in London earlier this week that she was "ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas"



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 11:15 PM
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Not so much the songs, but maybe more the political stance Similar effects.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: Profusion


If "Californication" is being pushed consciously around the world (as the song claims) then it's a conspiracy.

About what? A certain lifestyle pushed now makes a conspiracy? Please make yourself clear, especially with this




The song lays out the different aspects of the conspiracy (and each aspect is a different conspiracy in itself).

Can you name 3 aspects at least and their subsequent conspiracy in it self?



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 08:40 AM
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Testament went all out Reptilian Conspiracy in their latest effort. Awesome song:



A song by Hypocrisy about the New World Order. In fact, the whole album is about that:




posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 09:42 AM
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From what I have heard, "Strange Fruit" was a risky choice for Billie Holiday- she feared retaliation for performing it.



Sal


a reply to: Profusion



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