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"Beam me up Scotty!" - Mandela Effect

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posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 12:36 AM
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a reply to: imjack

As someone who is easily open minded and daft enough to believe this sort of thing, what I really can't understand is that ME believers cannot see how language and the human brain work naturally to morph our memories of things like this and the Luke I am your father line, with no supernatural intervention whatsoever needed. It's a simple case of the original quote making no sense out of context (No I am your father) so to quote it in a casual conversation or reference our societal memory of the quote, it must be deliberately altered to something that gets the gist across without having to reenact the entire scene line by line (Luke I am your father). Changing No to Luke in a conversational context simply makes it such quicker to get your point across.




posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: elliotmtl
But that would mean you're just like everybody else.
It would mean that you're not from another world. It would mean you're not really a prince who was stolen at birth.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 01:03 AM
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My old man pointed this out to me 20 years ago. It was never said.

Sometimes, "Beam us up, Mr. Scott", but never the famous line.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 01:06 AM
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a reply to: SlowNail

But it makes a good line at a bar.
"Can I get you a drink?"
"Beam me up, Scotty."


Maybe not. They never laugh. It would work better if Jim Beam were a scotch. But I don't like scotch. Much.

edit on 9/21/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 07:30 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: elliotmtl
But that would mean you're just like everybody else.
It would mean that you're not from another world. It would mean you're not really a prince who was stolen at birth.


The ironic thing is, I actually do believe I'm from another world. Not my human self, which is quite boring and insignificant, just my "soul" as it were. However, I am fully aware I might hilariously wrong merely on souls existing in the first place, and believing this does not in any way require me to believe in the insane bad-TV-plot idea that a few simplistic inaccuracies and dualities in my memory are due to some kind of multiversity timeline effery, and not just my own brain betraying me like it does on a daily basis anyway.

I have to wonder if ME people have ever, say, misplaced their keys?
edit on 21-9-2016 by elliotmtl because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 08:10 AM
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This whole Mandela Effect thing is strange. I don't really buy into it, but I feel there's something weird going on, it can't be all just faulty memory. Anyway, here's something that may help clarifying some of the cases:

Your Memory is Like the Telephone Game



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: Raven_Heart
This whole Mandela Effect thing is strange. I don't really buy into it, but I feel there's something weird going on, it can't be all just faulty memory.


So why don't they get 100% on school exams all the time? And why can't they repeat exactly several complex sentences that they've just read?



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 10:46 AM
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So why don't they get 100% on school exams all the time? And why can't they repeat exactly several complex sentences that they've just read?


I never said that everyone who claims to experience the ME should have some kind of freakish genius memory. I think it's strange that so many people remember the same things in the same wrong way. Something does not sound right about all this stuff.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 10:55 AM
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I think its in the same mental hiccup as people calling our favorite Vulcan, Dr Spock not Mister. I expect it grew from some skit on something like Saterday Night Live. Watched TOS, TNG, DS9, Voyager [rewatching again now lol] Enterprise [cough] end to end. Kirk never said the words "Beam me up scotty" in my timeline lol. I guess he could have in the mirror universe lol.



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: Raven_Heart



So why don't they get 100% on school exams all the time? And why can't they repeat exactly several complex sentences that they've just read?


I never said that everyone who claims to experience the ME should have some kind of freakish genius memory. I think it's strange that so many people remember the same things in the same wrong way. Something does not sound right about all this stuff.


People remember the same things in the same wrong way for plenty of perfectly logical reasons:
1) They're all human, so they all have human brains, which are subject to the same basic physiological processes when it comes to perceiving, storing, retaining and recalling information. Their brains take the same shortcuts. We also tend to dream in the same archetypes.
2) They experience the same cultural references which reinforce the same wrong memories. "Beam me up Scotty" and "Luke I am your father" are perfect examples. With regard to Berenstein, we all know people with the last name stein, but how many people know others with the last name Stain?



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: Greggers

Another good example is "Play it again, Sam", which is a mis-remembered/mis-quoted line from the film Casablanca.

Humphrey Bogart's character never said that line in the film (although he said something close), but the idea that he did say that had become part of popular culture, possibly bolstered by a popular 1960s Broadway play and 1970s film named Play it Again Sam.

So, yeah -- people are likely to all remember the same misquote because popular culture or mass media had used the misquote. I bet most people who think it's "Play it again, Sam" never saw Casablanca, and many of the people who think it's "Luke, am your father" never saw The Empire Strikes Back.

Most are simply remembering and repeating the misquotes from mass media. Even if they did see the original source material, their memories may have since been changed by the mass media and popular culture misquotes.


As for "___stein" versus "___stain":
Yeah, it's quite obvious that many of the people who would hear the name of the author of those books, or only casually look at the name on the books, would assume it to be "stein" because it is an much much more common ending for a name than is "stain".


edit on 2016-9-21 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 11:49 AM
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The Mandela effect again?

Well, play it again, Sam.........


(*Someone beat me to it above, lol)
edit on 21-9-2016 by Maverick1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 07:28 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

I'm actually 99 percentiles and I almost broke the world record on Classic Simon. I scored an 87 when the record was 127 and I mistakenly dropped my phone :-(.

I used a Loki technique to change 9 colors at a time into imagery and could remember about 12 of them vividly.

I admitted to never watching Star Trek though. Despite all the other Mandela stuff I found this interesting. It would be totally different if I watched the series and was confident I saw it happen.
edit on 21-9-2016 by imjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 08:32 PM
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Yet another pop culture reference from years ago.

I'll be more open to the idea if I wake up one day and Nebraska is Mukamukaland and Millard Fillmore is on the ten dollar bill.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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originally posted by: imjack
a reply to: Byrd

I admitted to never watching Star Trek though. Despite all the other Mandela stuff I found this interesting. It would be totally different if I watched the series and was confident I saw it happen.


Even if you did watch the series, there has been enough pop culture and media references to "Beam Me Up Scotty" over the years since the series ended that your memory may have been affected by those after-the-fact references.

And all it takes for pop culture or media to latch onto a misquote is to have that misquote appear once somewhere in one popular TV show, movie or other outlet. That's probably the case with the "Play it again, Sam" misquote. The misquote occurs once in a mass pop-culture outlet, and then everyone repeats the misquote as if it is the actual quote.


edit on 2016-9-22 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)







 
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