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Prehistoric fortifications found in the Basalt Desert of Eastern Jordan

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posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 10:41 PM
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Aerial view of Khirbet al-Jabariya, in northeastern Jordan [Credit: R. Bewley/APAAME]

Since 2010 the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been carrying out a research project in the basalt desert of Northeastern Jordan, which is funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft –DFG).



Tulul al-Ghusayn: View of some garden terraces in the crater [Credit: B. Müller-Neuhof/Dai-Orientabteilung]


n the context of this project several fortified settlements have been discovered which were built in the early to mid-4th millennium BC on volcanos in this region and are therefore among the earliest fortifications in Southwest Asia. Read more at archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com...



Due to the current arid conditions in this region it was initially expected that the basalt desert could only be used on a regional base during the wet season in winter and spring. This assumption has to be revised, and it can therefore be expected that it was possible at least at the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to establish permanently occupied settlements on specific sites. Read more at archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com...

So straight out of the neolithic these folks were fearful enough to set up fortifications, perhaps to fend off nomadic raiders of crops, my take is
If we look at the conditions of the Sahara at about 4000 B.C then perhaps a bit of green was still possible in places like that area of Jordan and the Levant to sustain settled communities even if they held a defensive posture.




posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 11:40 PM
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when you look at the aerial view, it would be hell trying to assault that area, built in a very nice area, considering resources.

Going against that up hill. could it have been other people or packs of predators.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 12:23 AM
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originally posted by: cenpuppie
when you look at the aerial view, it would be hell trying to assault that area, built in a very nice area, considering resources.

Going against that up hill. could it have been other people or packs of predators.

If I remembered right, I think in another early settlement in the Levant they had watch towers , and what was Jericho known for???..yes it's defensive walls, so i'd go with keeping bad guys out as the main reason.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 02:00 AM
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a reply to: Spider879
The Old Testament describes what was happening in the Iron Age, but the social conditions are probably similar.
In those days the Israelite tribes of Gad, Rueben, and Manasseh, were defending themselves against Ammonites, Moabites, Ishmaelites, "and sichlike" (as my father would say).
In that region was the frontier town of Jabesh-Gilead. Ahab lost his life trying to take it back.
A couple of months back there was a thread about similar diggings in the region. Obviously an earlier report, possibly a different site location.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: Spider879

Even from the picture you can see the location provides quite the view, the angle seems to hide everything if you were to approach from the tall side. It might not be as old as they think though, the location looks perfect for seeing potential enemies way in advance. A nice sentry line sending the message to a place like this could stop a conflict completely as it would give plenty of time to deny the enemy water and food... It quickly becomes unfeasible carrying enough water to clench the thirst of a few thousand men marching over the desert, especially when you've been spotted way in advance.

Personally I'd say it's where I would keep a few hundred charioteers that would indirectly attack approaching armies, you can do a lot of damage with mobility in the desert.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Well said Ray well said, although this may well be the age before chariots and if so would make life even more miserable for any approaching attackers.
edit on 20-9-2016 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: Spider879
a reply to: RAY1990

Well said Ray well said, although this may well be the age before chariots and if so would make life even more miserable for any approaching attackers.


Heck, the trek across the desert would do that! Just ask the Crusaders of the 12th century who passed through the area!

I also noticed the somewhat fractal nature of the garden terraces (that I mistook for walls at first) and spill in a rather interesting way down the sides of the volcanoes.




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