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Your Relatives DNA could turn you into a Suspect

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posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:04 PM
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Not sure which forum this should go into

It's an older article but bears posting to make people aware.
www.wired.com...
I'm sure there are other articles but I include this one because it gives an example of a person being sought for a cold case murder, all because his father once submitted his DNA into one of these geneology catalogues

Police can run a familial DNA search, a technique that allows investigators to identify suspects who don’t have DNA in a law enforcement database but whose close relatives have had their genetic profiles cataloged.

It should be noted Ancestry and other geneology projects have bought genetic databases and turn them over to law enforcement to hunt for genetic leads even though It's a well known fact familial DNA searches can generate a high rate of false positives. The wrong person can be convicted of a crime they didn't even commit

According to this article it can be medical or genealogical whereupon a person unknowingly submits their genetic code, yet they are never told it may one day be used in forensic sciences.




posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: violet

I can understand people wanting to know about their ancestors, but submitting DNA, when it will be there for anyone to access, seems unwise! Some poor sap will end up charged, because of circumstances and some relative's family tree search, at the rate they are going.



posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

My daughter loves poking around those sites. It's driving me nuts. She's finding death certificates, all kinds of secrets we would rather not know. At one point she accused me of lying about how my mother died! I'm telling her to leave it alone, stop poking your nose through these records.

I'm aIways seeing those ancestry ads on tv going I thought I was Scottish, turns out I'm Italian or whatever. I guess people like knowing their heritage so they are falling for it. I've long since suspected those ancestry sites had hidden agendas. Any reason to go around rounding up people in the Orwellian future.

it's also any time you submit DNA through medical things.

Then with these iPhones using the fingerprint to unlock the phone. Now there's one using a retinal scan. Although I suppose I've already provided my retinal scan last time I got my eyes tested at the opthamologist.



posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:46 PM
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If your not guilty, then you just give them a sample and you will be taken off the list. In the case listed, the guys kid was guilty of a crime.

Also that was a rare case, the company that did that was dissolved or something and so the information was not protected anymore. Ancestry and the other sites have been approached but have never given out any specific information. They flat out refused to give it to the police agencies. The data they collect is also not admissible in court so it can't be used to get a warrant. The company in the article actually collected legal snps I think which most of the ancestry companies avoid.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:05 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

If issued a warrant they have to comply and turn over the DNA data

Besides my OP was covering not just ancestry site but other geneology sites and medical purposes.


It's a fact DNA databases are being collected and growing in number to be used for forensic reasons.

Surely you could agree if the police can't pin down a suspect, they are going to look at additional options for locating a close match?

Yes you can provide DNA and rule yourself out, but sometimes the DNA profile they collected wasn' t complete, if say the collected sample was degraded in some way ( some information Is missing) and they decide to proceed with it
edit on 19-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)

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edit on 19-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:21 AM
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a reply to: violet




if say the collected sample was degraded in some way ( some imformation Is missing) and they decide to proceed with it

If the sample is insufficient for an ID it is insufficient for an ID.

edit on 9/19/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:35 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: violet




if say the collected sample was degraded in some way ( some imformation Is missing) and they decide to proceed with it

If the sample is insufficient for an ID it is insufficient for an ID.

Agreed, but a person will still be questioned and needing to hire lawyers and disruption of their life.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
If your not guilty, then you just give them a sample and you will be taken off the list.


In the mean time, since there was a preponderance of evidence, they've found an excuse to pull civil asset forfeiture on your bank accounts and property. And good luck getting what part of that back you will in time to keep your life in one piece...



edit on 19-9-2016 by CraftBuilder because: of typos.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 02:12 AM
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Some more information
This is not about using ancestry.com,
but by way of an offender database, whereby a relative has submitted DNA for a previous crime (unrelated to the crime bring searched) and they try to locate one that's close enough, then they can go through this persons family to find the suspect who's DNA was left at the crime

Identifying Criminals Through Their Family Members


When a DNA profile is obtained from a crime scene and that profile is passed through the FBI's electronic program, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS). A perfect hit will be obtained if all 26 alleles match a DNA profile in the database, indicating that the DNA sample is from the same person. But if a partial match occurs on at least 15 or more alleles then this could indicate that a close relative left the sample at the crime scene. A relative whose past conviction or arrest required them to provide their DNA can now send another family member to prison.

DNA Forensics
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However, they can still proceed in issuing a warrant to these other databases
edit on 19-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 02:31 AM
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a reply to: violet

I don't mind the data, as far as that goes. Was able to find census records for grandparents, which was cool. As for DNA, though, no way! If they want it, they'll have to get it via a blood test or something, and that seems unlikely on a large scale. Otherwise, those sites wouldn't ask. Eye scan, well, the eye doc has mine, too. Regular vision appointments are a must, with mine, and a scan to be sure all is well isn't a bad idea. I will NOT use the fingerprint things, for devices. Son's laptop had that option, and he never even opened it. "No way" was his response.

I think they do have an agenda, though. Who is related to whom is important to the elites. Of course, they would want to know who is in their own lines, but you have to wonder if there is more to it, Are they looking for some other groups, perhaps? Descendants of some line with whom there is a long-running feud, maybe? People with odd skills? Who knows! Something, though, I agree. Way too many ads for those, the classmates stuff, wanting to link everyone on social media, etc.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

There's so much linking up of everyone going on these days. Youngsters are into it more and not really caring. My kids are all into that find a friend thing. Showing their exact locations to be found. " oh here let me look, she's in this store right here... On a map!" You can't tell me that's just for fun to be found by your "friends". They think it is, but really it's to allow continuous tracking of yourself. They don't have skills anymore on how to live normally as we used to. Life exists in their iPhones or androids. So they're being trained to accept it.



This can be good in catching bad people, I'm not saying that's a bad idea, but you're right, who knows what the real interest is in it.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 09:27 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes


Let us move beyond the discussion of basic identifiers of personhood to classes and types of people determined by their DNA. My understanding is that there are various degrees of depth to which DNA can be determined and that much of it is considered unimportant or even "junk" DNA when it comes to determining the identity of a criminal or family member. Suppose there is a big lie in what we are told and some of that junk DNA is indicative of other elements?

As a UFO abductee, it seems obvious that the progeny of abductees have altered genes that can be isolated to show exactly that feature. There is no better explanation for the "medical exams" given to abductees.

Both science and its main supporter, government, would be keenly interested in where those genes have been spread in the population. Such knowledge, work and possible tracking of "UFO genetics" would be kept highly secret within the general emphasis on DNA research and collections and reasons for doing so would be entirely reasonable and without suspicion.

We are now starting to see the visual and physical effects of this new breed of humans as they begin to seriously interact with the status quo.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: Aliensun

I suppose one could look at all the other things that might affect DNA

What about organ transplant recipients? There's some theories out there that if you receive the organ of another you might take on some of their personality traits. I don't think there's any scientific data to back that up though

I'm just wondering when dna's co mingle do they create a new genetic code. I mean it obviously does during conception, the baby has each of its psrents genetic code.

So how about Blood transfusions?

IVF and other fertility procedures?

I read one study ( no idea if it's true, was done at UCLA) that they took saliva from test people and placed it in s Petrie dish and looked at it to see if it was reacting to the people's who' saliva it belonged to. They sent a couple off to have sex and they were to record the times they felt aroused, climaxed etc. The saliva apparently changed its characteristics at the same time. Like I said , no idea if it's true

There are all sorts of bizzare medical things ( might not be related to DNA) like the phantom limbs, where an amputee thinks the limb is still there. This might explain the above saliva test where a missing body part is still connected somehow. Plants apparently react the same way, if you cut off part of its leaf, the aura of the whole leaf remains

Then there's memories that can pass down through families :



Experiments showed that a traumatic event could affect the DNA in sperm and alter the brains and ... and provided "compelling evidence" that a form of memory could be passed between generations .


BBC

edit on 19-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: violet
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

There's so much linking up of everyone going on these days. Youngsters are into it more and not really caring. My kids are all into that find a friend thing. Showing their exact locations to be found. " oh here let me look, she's in this store right here... On a map!" You can't tell me that's just for fun to be found by your "friends". They think it is, but really it's to allow continuous tracking of yourself. They don't have skills anymore on how to live normally as we used to. Life exists in their iPhones or androids. So they're being trained to accept it.

This can be good in catching bad people, I'm not saying that's a bad idea, but you're right, who knows what the real interest is in it.


Oh, that sort of thing, I simply cannot understand people wanting to use!! I could, perhaps, get parents wanting to keep track of their kids, but even that has risks. If they can track them, so can someone else. Even without that, people post to social media every single little thing they do. "Breakfast at the doughnut shop!", "On my way to work at (wherever)", and so forth. Gee, why not just invite the crazy stalker in for coffee, already? They are being trained, however, and conditioned to see this as somehow normal. It's bizarre. Kids can become bored if they don't have an electronic device or controller in their hands, as though there is nothing else worth doing. Tablets are being pushed in the schools, in the place of textbooks. It's gotten to the pint that a lot of people don't know how to do anything, unless they can look it up online. I require mine to use books, including an actual encyclopedia, rather than a computer. Using computers is fine, of course, but it shouldn't be the only option. So far, they don't mess with the social media at all. As an adult, I get frustrated with how many people won't email anymore, and prefer to just post to some website or another, to stay in touch.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

So they're pushing tablets in a school now?
I recall when I was forced to buy a home computer because the school said so. All homework had to be done online.

You never hear the sound of children playing outside anymore. I suppose it's not safe nowadays anyways, but it's just so sad.

We live in a world of constant tracking. People are conditioned to accept it as ok . I wonder how long it will be before it's a law you must have a camera watching you inside your own home.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: violet




You never hear the sound of children playing outside anymore.

I do.
Damned noisy kids. They should be watching Superman and the Three Stooges, like I did.


edit on 9/23/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 03:26 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Right. It's just that simple, isn't it? Watch the recent episode of Through the Wormhole w/ Morgan Freeman - that's the title of the show and not that Freeman makes it any more worthwhile - entitled "Is Privacy Dead?".

DNA databases CAN be hacked. So if the guy can hack a DNA database, who say's that someone can't hack it and change something to make it fit their agenda?

EVERYTHING can be hacked, or cracked, or whatever term is the right one.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: TheSpanishArcher

Paranoia strikes deep. If it ain't your DNA it's your cell phone. If it ain't your cell phone it's your very thoughts.

What good living in fear?
edit on 9/23/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2016 @ 03:33 AM
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originally posted by: violet
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

So they're pushing tablets in a school now?
I recall when I was forced to buy a home computer because the school said so. All homework had to be done online.

You never hear the sound of children playing outside anymore. I suppose it's not safe nowadays anyways, but it's just so sad.

We live in a world of constant tracking. People are conditioned to accept it as ok . I wonder how long it will be before it's a law you must have a camera watching you inside your own home.


That's what I have read, with debates on whether or not it's a good idea. Forced to buy a computer??? How the heck can they enforce that??? For a time, the only reason we owned a computer at all was that a relative bought us one. Id have told them where to stick that! Not everyone can afford a computer. Of course, I have heard of schools issuing laptops, too, then spying on kids through the webcams.

Scary thought, but possible! These days, some companies want DVRs to be able to have cams, and track how many people are in a room, supposedly to "protect their interests", because, gee, so many people are commercially showing television in their living rooms. Crazy days!!



posted on Sep, 24 2016 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes
Well my daughter said all homework must be done on a computer. She was going to friends houses to do it and half the time not getting it done which affected her grades. I asked why cant you write this out on paper you know? Had to be done online, this was 2003,, so we had s friend who sold us a used one. Couldn't afford it! It really pissed me off. Here I was trying to keep my kids off them and had to change how I was raising my kids. The whole thing pissed me off. Need to buy a desk for it as well oh and a printer, ink and paper of course! Chair too. Get internet.

Eventually they just make you go along with stuff. Like the dumb smart meter I never wanted. I imagine soon the power companies will say you must change your thermostat to a smart one or we can't serve you. Then we'll have our heat regulated. Obama signed that thing to cut back on air conditioning.

So I was googling will cameras be on homes. I saw that it will because it will be so normal to run a camera all day long so you can share Christmas with family who's far away! I won't be doing that! The future is cameras everywhere! I suppose were all being conditioned not to want privacy. Facebook and Instagram etc trains people to share everything.

Once our psrents all die, that's the last of the normal ones gone off this planet. My dad of course doesn't do any of this stuff , but he has been taught some things. He asked if I had Uber on my tv to watch old movie clips and singing, I said you must mean YouTube and no I don't have that on my tv.


edit on 24-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-9-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)




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