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Those Crazy Colombians

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posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 10:59 PM
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I wish I knew more about the plane. That's just nuts, though, that they are using the small model aircraft jet engines like that though...

geez.




posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:08 PM
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The Cri-Cri is a popular homebuilt design developed in France by engineer and pilot Michel Colomban. Colomban became fascinated by small aircraft and hoped to create a tiny and economical plane with good performance and aerobatic capabilities. His goal was a very simple and lightweight construction using no more than a 20-hp engine powering an airframe carrying a 172 lb (78 kg) pilot and 22 lb (10 kg) of fuel. Colomban's initial study in the late 1950s suggested that a single seat aircraft with a maximum takeoff weight of 395 lb (180 kg) and a wing area of 43 ft² (4 m²) was feasible.

www.aerospaceweb.org...



posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:25 PM
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That's gonna hurt when that crashes.



posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 11:26 PM
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It looks like a SmartCar.

What's the TW ratio?

Can you loop it?


edit on 9/18/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:18 AM
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a reply to: anzha

And he's not Colombian.....his last name is Colomban.

Got time to fix the title? Correct the spelling and it'll work
edit on 19-9-2016 by LightAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:19 AM
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That's pretty cool. I would totally take one for a spin!




posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:52 AM
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Half expected the engines to rip clean off those little flaps.

That looks terrifying.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:01 AM
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a reply to: Phage


At least one Cri-Cri has also been modified with a pair of AMT Olympus turbines replacing the propeller-driven chain-saw engines. These new powerplants, designed for use on subscale radio controlled aircraft, generate over 80 lb (36 N) of thrust and raise the plane's top speed to 150 mph (240 km/h). Built by Nicolas Charmont of France, the jet-powered Cri-Cri has a maximum takeoff weight of 375 lb (170 kg).

www.aerospaceweb.org...

They're incredibly aerobatic. They have a roll rate of 360°/second.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
TW of something like 0.21 then. Respectable, not awesome.

Roll rate, awesome. If not scary.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:46 AM
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You guys look at this and see a cool small airplane with a space for a 175 pound guy.

I look at it, and see something you could put a computer nav system on and stuff with about 150 pounds of RDX/HDX, maybe have a data link to, and roll your own cruise missile.

Maybe not even RDX. There's a nice chemical binary that would be my first choice, but you pretty much have to say bon voyage to your health if you don't have proper protective gear for the hydrazine.

The main question would be, can you afford the weight penalty for a nice set of PA speakers for it to play "Ride of the Valkyries" as it homes in on your selected annoyance.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 11:34 AM
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How cool is that! if I was rich I`d have to have one.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 04:12 PM
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George Jetson on his way to work.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 04:47 PM
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I know how to build an afterburner. It would pick up that thrust to weight ratio.
edit on 19-9-2016 by JIMC5499 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

With that small an aircraft, one would lose any performance benefits due to the added weight required to fuel a thirsty after burner, not to mention it would probably come apart due to the sheer stresses.

But I like the way you think.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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originally posted by: AlongCamePaul
a reply to: JIMC5499

With that small an aircraft, one would lose any performance benefits due to the added weight required to fuel a thirsty after burner, not to mention it would probably come apart due to the sheer stresses.

But I like the way you think.

It would loiter, then dash... and bet if that were its purpose, the wings would be swept back a bit.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 02:10 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Zaphod58
TW of something like 0.21 then. Respectable, not awesome.

Roll rate, awesome. If not scary.

160# thrust (80 per engine), 400# wet weight.
Are you losing your mathamabilities?


edit on 20-9-2016 by paradoxious because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: paradoxious
One engine.
Oops.

Awesome (and scary) all around then.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: AlongCamePaul

I know, but imagine the looks you would get when you lit it off on takeoff.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 12:32 PM
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I'd immediately move those engines aft somewhere .
Flame out is at the very least a visual nightmare.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: UnderKingsPeak


I would guess they're placed forward to help balance weight and to keep them from ingesting too much.



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