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‘Copyright not divine right’: Indian court defends photocopying of university textbooks

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posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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The High Court of Delhi has made education easier for students by granting Delhi University the right to photocopy entire textbooks from major publishers, stating that copyright is not a “divine, or natural right.”

the Indian court upheld the decision to allow campus photocopy shops, along with the Delhi University library, to photocopy entire books.

“Copyright, especially in literary works, is thus not an inevitable, divine, or natural right that confers on authors the absolute ownership of their creations. It is designed rather to stimulate activity and progress in the arts for the intellectual enrichment of the public.”

The high court argued that the copying is not being done for commercial purposes, only for imparting knowledge.

Source

The High Court of Delhi has allowed the photocopying of entire textbooks under the premise that Copyright is not a natural right and that authors can't completely "own" their works. In regards to educational textbooks, specifically ones used for college or other schooling, this makes sense. It just seems morally wrong to me that there is a monetary value to knowledge. I feel that knowledge should be readily available to anyone who is using it to better themselves, such as university students. If I write an educational textbook about the human body which might be used by medical students, for example - did I create the human body? No, of course not. Did I create or discover any of the knowledge contained within the book? Most likely not. So why should I be awarded ownership rights simply for knowledge that I myself learned elsewhere?
I'm a current university student myself, and the prices of some of the textbooks I'm required to obtain for my classes are outrageous. What's worse is the information in these textbooks is usually stuff I can readily find for free on the internet, but yet, I have to unnecessarily pay hundreds of dollars - sometimes for books I don't even need to open.
So, should every student have unlimited free access to any textbook they want whenever they want? Not exactly. If someone chooses to spend their time putting information together into a book format to benefit others, they deserve to be compensated in some way for their time and effort. The companies who create, print, and ship the books deserve to be compensated as well. BUT... The level it's at currently is ridiculous, and this ruling by the High Court of Delhi is a major step in the right direction.




posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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Now if we can only bring back Mega Upload or better still, if its on the internet it belongs to everyone.

The battle for copy rights isn't about money as much as its about Censorship, imo.


The high court argued that the copying is not being done for commercial purposes, only for imparting knowledge.


Ask the land before internet what free information dissemination was all about. If it wasn't on TV, radio or the Newspapers, most people didn't hear about it.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:14 AM
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Good decision by the court, especially when it comes to educating children. "Copyrights" should play absolutely no role. Personally, School textbooks should be available for free online
edit on 17-9-2016 by maddy21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:32 AM
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LOL I used to do that (not whole text books mind ya) when I was in school, I would copy the sections relevant to my studies so I didn't have to carry a million books around for reference and research, I was inevitably told I am breaking the law by the school librarian



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:34 AM
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If only this would encourage publishers to lower the artificially raised pricetags they place on texts bound for college bookstores.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:41 AM
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Everything in the entire universe belongs to everyone.

Intellectual Property laws should be struck down, right along with Corporate Personhood....

Get some competition going here, instead of this "Let's pretend we are not socialists" Nonsense.

Be capitalists, but remember your environment is not recoverable if you ruin it.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 11:03 AM
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There are publishing companies who do only text books for schools. What happens when those publishers go out of business, because very few are actually paying for their books?
Where does all that get put together? What are you going to copy then?



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: trollz

That is fantastic for India. Remove the financial barrier to education for F's sake.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: trollz


So if you become a teacher, should you not be paid for teaching others your own ideas, concepts and understandings about the subject? How is it any different if you were standing up front instructing students or they were reading from a pirated book? Very slippery slope there.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 12:21 PM
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Well, you can photocopy portions of books for educational purposes, and other purposes too. However, photocopying the whole book is taking the piddle. This is you dissuade people from writing educational books and thus shoot yourself in the foot.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
There are publishing companies who do only text books for schools. What happens when those publishers go out of business, because very few are actually paying for their books?
Where does all that get put together? What are you going to copy then?


I hope they do go out of business



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: MiloTheMarauder

originally posted by: DAVID64
There are publishing companies who do only text books for schools. What happens when those publishers go out of business, because very few are actually paying for their books?
Where does all that get put together? What are you going to copy then?


I hope they do go out of business


That is sure to improve the quality of education.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 01:36 PM
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The problem with this argument is that it isn't the knowledge but how it is presented that has the copy write. For example, 2+2 =4. However, two different book publishers may present the concept in a different manner and they have the right to protect their work in doing so. A business has to compile the information, put it in a usable format, print the books,market the books, etc. There is no incentive to do this if they cannot protect their intellectual property.

This ruling is absurd.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 03:16 PM
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Copyright is not a divine right, but photocopying is?


edit on 17-9-2016 by paradoxious because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 03:21 PM
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Getting something for nothing is the selfish instinct of all people, but to actually carry it out is when a crime happens. "Thou shall not steal."



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Aliensun

I don't see this as a slippery slope but rather trying to stop cheating. India rates number 1 in the world for collage level cheating on tests. So much so that the schools had to employ the military to stand watch over students to keep there parents from slipping them test answers, as well as passing notes to each other. Now what happens when they no longer need the test in advance because they can take the text book into the room with them for testing. I saw this on a CNN news report a couple of years ago it was something else. News cameras looking right at them as they looked into the camera while passing a piece of paper to another student. Then they showed parents trying give money to soldiers to let them in.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 11:27 AM
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originally posted by: maddy21
Good decision by the court, especially when it comes to educating children. "Copyrights" should play absolutely no role. Personally, School textbooks should be available for free online


A bit late to this thread, but the article deals with university textbooks which are notorious for high price and low value. The trend I've seen is that most professors are rather sympathetic and are trying to get around the book requirements. I don't think I've actually had to buy a book in something like 3 years now and instead we use books that have been published online that are free to use.



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