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Ask a REAL data security expert, copy how NSA does it, or give up, go home

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posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: Op3nM1nd3d

I don't rent servers in China currently, but yea you can colocate and generally have 24/7 access to them. Most new datacenters have decent to stellar security measures in place. Some not so much. I did a colocation last year locally where once you were in the center, they let you walk around and didn't have a clue if you were messing with your own server or not
That's not usually how it works out. Of course, there are cameras installed and you could get caught after the fact.


Yes, that is pretty much what this thread is about. I use a VPN for a specific use case, and wouldn't bother for general internet usage.
edit on 15-9-2016 by pl3bscheese because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: Op3nM1nd3d

Well in the case of my VPN company not logging, i can promise you thats a 100% fact... Its my company


So far we generate about 15,000 penetration attempts per day. Haven't been hacked yet.

Skiddies will be skiddies.



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

So you could basically own the system and no one would know since cameras are probably connected to it. That`s some real high security datacenter


a reply to: AnonyMason

Good for you, I hope you don`t mind, If I find that hard to believe. Nothing personal, just me having a paranoid thinking in a paranoid-oriented discussion



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: Op3nM1nd3d
a reply to: pl3bscheese

So you could basically own the system and no one would know since cameras are probably connected to it. That`s some real high security datacenter



I'm not following. If you are presuming that security cameras are connected to racked servers that you're compromising, then no... even #ty datacenters have sealed-off command centers.



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: Op3nM1nd3d

I understand. If you would like a link to our website i can PM it to you. Our privacy and logging policy is easily available to the public and potential customers. I used to have a banner with the URL in my signature, but was asked by a mod to remove it because of advertising.

For any one else looking for a VPN to increase privacy and protect some of your personal data, the legalese should look some variation of this:

By design, CompanyXYZ does not record, retain, or archive any system logs that would identify any aspect of a customer’s user account or activity except Username, Password and account expiration date/time. This non-logging includes but is not limited to packet traffic, incoming IP address, date/time stamp of connection(s), packet source or destination(s), or packet port assignments. In short syslogd is turned off and /var/log/messages is /dev/null.
edit on 15-9-2016 by AnonyMason because: example given



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

That`s probably true but even then they have to operate from somewhere. I would imagine they are wired via cables inside a concrete shafts specifically designed for it. But you never know...until you know. Certainly wouldn`t be connected to wifi, would it?


a reply to: AnonyMason

How old is your company? You may send me a link via PM but I make no promises...



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 02:55 PM
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I vaguely remember when the air gap hack was discovered, I cant remember who but he thought he was going crazy and everyone thought it was a hoax.



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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Why do I feel like the OP hit me with an infomercial?



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 04:55 PM
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originally posted by: kobalt7
I vaguely remember when the air gap hack was discovered, I cant remember who but he thought he was going crazy and everyone thought it was a hoax.


a reply to: kobalt7

It's called the "badBIOS" a security consultant Dragos Ruiu discovered it and it did massive damage to a large number of his systems. The weird part was machines were getting infected without ever being plugged into the internet or any usb/cd's being placed in the machines which started the hole story of the malware infecting and spreading through the air.

I still don't think anyone has been able to prove this, but I think the most logical explanation was your motherboard's speaker transmitting a very high frequency sound and if the receiving computer had a microphone hooked up it could pick up those frequency sounds and install software or basically communicate. Now this seems possible by far but the computer with the microphone would need the software already installed to decode those frequencies and communicate.

Anyways here is the article:



Meet “badBIOS,” the mysterious Mac and PC malware that jumps airgaps

arstechnica.com...

edit on 15-9-2016 by Algorithm because: Added title and quote



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: samkent
Why do I feel like the OP hit me with an infomercial?


Because he did try to hit you with an infomercial.

Sidenote; nobody should ever be walking around your data center or your server room without an escort.

This is why =)




posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: Algorithm

Air gapped attacks are not limited to Bad Bios, and there are numerous ways they are able to happen (ive already cited one in my first response on this thread). Here are some more "air gapped" attacks that can occur.

Clever Attack Uses The Sound Of A Computers Fan To Steal Data

Researchers Hack Air-Gapped Computer With Simple Cell Phone

Hacking Air Gapped Computers Using Heat

Stealing Decryption Key From Air Gapped Computer In Another Room

These are just a few examples of ways you can hack air gapped computers.



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: Vizzle

I think he was talking about the bad bios thats why I linked that. I understand there are numerous attack vectors through air gaps but what I would like to know if its possible to spread a virus to computers in the following scenario:

No Wireless / Wired Connection
No Bluetooth
No CD Drive or USB

In the badbios situation they claim machines were getting infected under this scenario. Again the only way I see this physically possible is a motherboards speaker and using it to send pulses much like an internet cable but that implies the computer receiving these frequency pulses would need some type of way to detect them aka a microphone even then the receiving computer would already of had to be infected to turn those pulses into information which goes against the original story/scenario.

Now almost all of these attacks you linked are attack vectors we should take seriously but these are done within a controlled environment specifically setup to achieve the result. It's highly unlikely someone is going to come into the same room as your computer and pull any type of usable data from heat or magnetic waves from your fans. But then again the "Stealing Decryption Key From Air Gapped Computer In Another Room " is a very real threat that we could potentially see publicly available in the wild in the near future. Thanks for the share!



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 06:09 PM
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From what i have read (I am still learning), internet security can be looked at in three ways.

1) Security by Correctness
2) Security by Isolation
3) Security by Obscurity


Qubes OS addresses number 2. I have been testing it for a while now on my second drive.




Qubes implements a Security by Isolation approach. To do this, Qubes utilizes virtualization technology in order to isolate various programs from each other and even to sandbox many system-level components, such as networking and storage subsystems, so that the compromise of any of these programs or components does not affect the integrity of the rest of the system.

Qubes lets the user define many security domains, which are implemented as lightweight Virtual Machines (VMs), or “AppVMs.” For example, the user can have “personal,” “work,” “shopping,” “bank,” and “random” AppVMs and can use the applications within those VMs just as if they were executing on the local machine. At the same time, however, these applications are well isolated from each other. Qubes also supports secure copy-and-paste and file sharing between the AppVMs, of course.


Default virtual machines (VMs) are Fedora or Debian. You can also create Whonix/Tor VMs as well as disposable VMs for one off specific tasks. Default GUI has recently been changed from KDE to Xfce4

I am self-taught when it comes to Linux and found Qubes very easy to understand and use (although I am not an expert).




posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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Thanks everyone for all the computer wizardry that i can use


Guessing i shouldn't listen to the OP?

Can you help me with my mobile.

I use my smartphone for most of my internet usage,, after turning off locations, using a few apps, Fake GPS location, CM security(with private browsing) yandex/others, Android assistant,,Clean master for all the other stuff.

Would I be remotely safe?



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: DarkvsLight29

It really depends on your threat model. If you are worried about it, look into getting a vpn that works on your phone.



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: DannyBoy555

Where are their usual recruits coming from?
Is That the type Hillary uses?



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: Algorithm

I think this is what you were looking for.



Computers housing the world’s most sensitive data are usually “air-gapped” or isolated from the internet. They’re also not connected to other systems that are internet-connected, and their Bluetooth feature is disabled, too. Sometimes, workers are not even allowed to bring mobile phones within range of the computers. All of this is done to keep important data out of the hands of remote hackers.

But these security measures may be futile in the face of a new technique researchers in Israel have developed for stealthily extracting sensitive data from isolated machines—using radio frequency signals and a mobile phone.

source


It is like you said, under the specific conditions but not impossible, though in this case they used electromagnetic radiation associated with the display adapter.



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 12:18 AM
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a reply to: DannyBoy555


All of that and you were unable to mark the difference between a hacker and a cracker?



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 12:49 AM
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a reply to: DarkvsLight29



I use my smartphone for most of my internet usage,, after turning off locations, using a few apps, Fake GPS location, CM security(with private browsing) yandex/others, Android assistant,,Clean master for all the other stuff.

Would I be remotely safe?


The answer is no. Technicallly, you could try turning off the radio signal by going flight mode and manually enabling wifi. Even better option would be connecting it to lan via ethernet cable, in this case you would need the buy yourself the right connector. But then again I wouldn`t bet on being safe proof either. What you have to understand is that smartphones are a perfect surveillance kit.

You may also want to use VPN services as suggested but that`s just another party to worry about compromising your data. Unless you own your own server. Alterantively you could use tor browser or proxy servers but it goes the same way as VPN regarding risk even though VPN is a much much safer option as it encrypts all of your internet access.



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: AnonyMason




I stopped reading when you suggested running deprecated versions of Winblows. Get some Linux in your life. Gentoo Hardened is a good choice, but well above the understanding of the average Microsuck user. There are easier to learn alternatives such as Heardened Ubuntu, which is the Ubuntu answer to Gentoo's security hardened OS.


First of all, Linux is not the answer to everything. There are things that Windows can do that Linux cannot, just ask any defense contractor why they support it. You also missed the point about XP, in that it is the only Microsoft OS that can STILL be buttoned down.

Linux bigots bother me because they show an incomplete understanding of the technology and lack of experience. Disrespect for MS (Winblows,Microsuck? Really?)... Juvenile words showing how much of the history of this industry you also do not understand. Many of us can list 25 or more operating systems that we have used and programmed under in the past, and I would bet you could probably list 2 or 3...
edit on 16-9-2016 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



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