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Worldwide Mutual Respect thread - the Stall

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posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 06:38 AM
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originally posted by: MaxTamesSiva
a reply to: swanne
Me too, I'm still trying to read up on the topic which might sound like a modern philosophy but could actually be a very, very old concept.

Which is another plus. If it survived Time, then perhaps it is a proof of its efficiency.


Do you think that the farm tower concept will work if adopted exclusively to cultivating marijuana?

Undoubtedly. However when I see starvation, which is even present in a big shot city I often visit, I note that food is most probably a priority resource.

In that spirit, I searched around to try and find the plants which are the richest in nutriments. I found quite a few promising candidates:


kale

Of all the super healthy leafy greens, kale is the king.

It is loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants and various bioactive compounds.

A 100 gram portion of kale contains (9):

200% of the RDA for Vitamin C.
300% of the RDA for Vitamin A (from beta-carotene).
1000% of the RDA for Vitamin K1.
Large amounts of Vitamin B6, Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Copper and Manganese.



potato

A single large potato contains lots of Potassium, Magnesium, Iron, Copper and Manganese… with plenty of vitamin C and most of the B vitamins (27).

Potatoes really are one of the world’s most perfect foods.

They contain a little bit of almost every nutrient we need and there have been accounts of people living on nothing but potatoes for a long time.

They are also one of the most fulfilling foods in existence. When researchers compared the “satiety value” of different foods, boiled potatoes scored higher than any other food they measured


Source: authoritynutrition.com...




posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: swanne
You got me, I was just thinking of it's (ahem) medicinal value but you're right, food should be the priority. Maybe the basement will suffice?



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: swanne

Excellent thread and thank you for linking me to it.

I'm from England, UK.

Some great ideas so far and poignant facts that the world is only slowly facing up to. One of them is the shear amount of garbage that is floating in the Pacific, I've seen a few ideas on how we can combat this.

One was an underwater skyscraper that would act like a giant sieve and compress plastics so that they can be recycled.
Underwater Skyscraper

Another is an underwater drone that would swim the oceans feeding on plastics like a Basking Shark.
Plastic Eating Drone

Last but not least is this guy's idea from the Netherlands, it would be a system of nets anchored to the sea bed that only let micro plastics through and concentrates them a bit like a cell would nutrients.
Plastic Catching Nets

So it's not all doom and gloom, some good ideas are being looked at.



posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 04:31 AM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

It sure would.

As a side note, aquaponics seems to be quite interesting of a system:




posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: Night Star

I do send my stuff to the recycling bin whenever I can. However I like to recycle it myself. Metal is very precious, you know; so often I actually keep my cans for the metal, aluminium foil for my capacitors, and copper wire (foud inside anything that has an electric motor) for my electromagnets and coils.

I just am not sure how much stuff I sent to the recycling bin actually gets recycled. How do I know they're aren't just dumping it all in a landfill?...




posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

The underwater skyscraper is very promising. Can you imagine the view, too? That would be awesome.

They would also be earthquake-resistant. And tidal waves wouldn't make as much damage as they do on terrestrial buildings.

And resistant to hurricanes. And tornadoes.

And hail.

As for the plastic recuperation thing, the net looks like the most efficient method, finally someone found a solution to the problem!




posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Night Star

I do send my stuff to the recycling bin whenever I can. However I like to recycle it myself. Metal is very precious, you know; so often I actually keep my cans for the metal, aluminium foil for my capacitors, and copper wire (foud inside anything that has an electric motor) for my electromagnets and coils.

I just am not sure how much stuff I sent to the recycling bin actually gets recycled. How do I know they're aren't just dumping it all in a landfill?...



You are doing your part. Whatever happens after that isn't your fault. Sadly, seeing how much mankind has screwed up the environment and other things, I don't hold out much hope.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

I'm a bit of a nerd so it's natural for me to see the value of what most people trash with no second thoughts.

Capacitors are the ancestors of the modern battery (and they are fully rechargeable), and you can make them with common kitchen materials people usually trash.



posted on Sep, 29 2016 @ 05:32 AM
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Some guys just found a way to make more efficient solar panels, and with less lead and harmful elements:

phys.org...


In hopes of one day replacing silicon-based photovoltaic cells, which are relatively expensive and require a lot of energy to make, scientists have turned to hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites that can be developed at a lower cost using less energy than silicon.


They are reporting a 15% figure of efficiency, which is pretty awesome.




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