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Cynthia , Flesh Eating Synthetic Bacteria That Has Gone Wild .

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posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 02:38 AM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

Do you believe everything your told?


hahaha really?

I'm not the one who believes everything pseudoscientific sites post. I actually never believe any articles written by journalists or bloggers, I always go to the original studies and analyze them myself.

In this case, the article you posted, talks about bacteria evolving into a pathogen by itself, without the input of Monsanto.





originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: SeaWorthy

Do you make up nonsense to fit your narrative when the evidence says the opposite of what you want it to say?


LOL
Unbelievable! I try to have a serious conversation but some people always end up relying on slander instead of refuting my claims.




posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

I read about it in the Virginia-Pilot newspaper during the oil spill ordeal. Unsure if it is man made or not. I am 50/50 on that one Agartha, because I have no sources, like yourself. It was so long ago, maybe that info was in the arricle. I was thinking of backordering but that's like 30 papers cause I have no idea which one it is and don't feel up to it. That's not my specialty.

edit on 18/9/2016 by Gyo01 because: (no reason given)

edit on 18/9/2016 by Gyo01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: Gyo01

I read about it in the Virginia-Pilot newspaper during the oil spill ordeal. Unsure if it is man made or not. I am 50/50 on that one Agartha, because I have no sources, like yourself. It was so long ago, maybe that info was in the arricle. I was thinking of backordering but that's like 30 papers cause I have no idea which one it is and don't feel up to it. That's not my specialty.


The microbes eating the oils spilled in the Gulf were/are natural, not man made. Here is a great article from 2015 that talks about them: How Microbes Helped Clean BP's Oil Spill

Meet the Microbes Eating the Gulf Oil Spill [Slide Show]




posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

Monsanto n Bayer is a done deal.
Now they can poison your food on the cheap.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: UKWO1Phot

Cheer up,Big pharma is coming to England.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: SIEGE


Battery acid will eat skin and flesh to so what's the difference?

How how material of Cynthia can eat of flesh before it stops or 'becomes full'. In active etc



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:42 AM
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originally posted by: chiefsmom
We, (Them) are just not going to be happy, until we have destroyed everything on this planet.

What the hell is wrong with people?

But "Hey, Monsanto is going to eliminate hunger and famine. And science is our friend. (as long as you can pay for it.)



I know, they've all gone batsh*t crazy. Too much power and money, and people have become merry andrews, mocking unbenounst even themselves.

If Monsanto isn't stopped, the future will remember this era in which we live now as a sad loss to Humanity where few people said or did anything to stop it.
edit on 9/19/2016 by awareness10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

This is what happens in a corporate environment and a monetary ecology.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: Agartha



For decades scientists have pursued genetic modifications that might enhance these microbes' ability to chew up oil spills, whether on land or sea. Even geneticist Craig Venter forecast such an application last week during the unveiling of the world's first synthetic cell, and one of the first patents on a genetically engineered organism was a hydrocarbon-eating microbe, notes microbiologist Ronald Atlas of the University of Louisville. But there are no signs of such organisms put to work outside the lab.


I dunno if we already see the signs by now. And there's this:


At this point, there are no man-made microbes that are more effective than naturally occurring ones at utilizing hydrocarbons.

Slick Solution: How Microbes Will Clean Up the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Which translates to "yes, we use them without any significant efficiency yet."

All of the above contradicts your statement, it's obviously not that easy.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

Did you see the article I posted on my last reply? Very similar to the one you posted, both from Scientific American but yours from 2010 and mine from 2015.


All of the above contradicts your statement, it's obviously not that easy


Which statement? I made many. LOL



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Agartha



The microbes eating the oils spilled in the Gulf were/are natural, not man made.


vs:


"Microbes are available now but they are not effective for the most part," says marine microbiologist Jay Grimes of the University of Southern Mississippi. At this point, there are no man-made microbes that are more effective than naturally occurring ones at utilizing hydrocarbons.


Man-made microbes in action, efficiency is the point they worried about at that time. One has to wonder why that story changed within a few years, which is precisely why I brought it up.

Pretty intriguing, innit?





posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

But they never said anywhere that they have created microbes and used them in the Gulf to eat the oils spill. It's not secret they have been trying to modify natural bacteria to make it more efficient, but they haven't been able to do so yet. And nowhere it says they have used man made microbes to clean up the sea. I don't think the story have changed.

My original statement still stands: no 'man-made-oil-eating-bacteria' has been released in the ocean and has been modified into flesh eating. No evidence of that at all.





posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

Star for your reply, but:
bioaugmentation, nothing new after all:


Despite the scientific skepticism, MicroSorb's Baird remains confident that her company, through its tireless petitioning to state officials and lawmakers in Washington, will win business in the Gulf. "We've had some dialogues with BP," she said, "and we remain very optimistic that we're going to be utilized to clean up the Gulf. So much so that we've ramped up production." "This should really be taken seriously," Baird said, "and the fact that it's not is a real problem."

Companies Peddling Microbial Cures to Oil Spill Come Calling on Gulf Coast

And a few months later we saw reports of it's application:


For many of the entrepreneurs, patience was a must. The Massachusetts-based MicroSorb Environmental Solutions, which makes what it says is a safe, hydrocarbon-eating microbe, reached out to BP in April, shortly after the spill began, to get its product into the Gulf. Last month, BP began the first tests on some of the 200 microbe proposals it received, Rowe says.
"We said three months ago that (microbes) should be tested," says Billy Nungesser, the president of Plaquemines Parish, La., and a frequent BP critic. "We're a day late and a dollar short," Nungesser says.

Ideas poured in for BP oil spill cleanup

That's just one company, I'd reckon there are more around. But it's enough evidence for our debate, innit?


edit on 19-9-2016 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha
Sorry, I don't see a conspiracy regarding a 'man-made-oil-eating-bacteria' that doesn't seem to have an origin in any lab. I have tried to find a link with Cynthia but it doesn't seem to exist, and I am not the type who believes stuff without good evidence.


I managed to find this link for the J. Craig Venter Institute about one of their special projects. Interestingly one of the researchers on the project is named Cynthia. Cynthia Andrews-Pfannkoch made the first important discoveries in the project. It never says what this bacteria is used for now or who is using it.

www.jcvi.org...

"In 2003 Drs. Venter, Smith and Hutchison (along with JCVI's Cynthia Andrews-Pfannkoch) made the first significant strides in the development of a synthetic genome by their work in assembling the 5,386 base pair bacteriophage ΦX174 (phi X). They did so using short, single strands of synthetically produced, commercially available DNA (known as oligonucleotides) and using an adaptation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), known as polymerase cycle assembly (PCA), to build the phi X genome. The team produced the synthetic phi X in just 14 days."

I think this shows that the bacteria was in fact created at this intitute, not seeing any info that show it has mutated, or 'proof' it has affected wildlife in the area.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 03:16 AM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

I star your replies too, because you actually discuss the topic and never the poster and I appreciate that!
And because you end your posts with 'innit'. lol


Bioaugmentation does not mean genetically modified, it means adding more bacterial cultures to speed up a specific reaction (usually degradation of a contaminant). Bioaugmentation is also known as the Oppenheimer formula (if you want to read more about it).

This is exactly what the Microsorb microbes are: a consortium of more than 100 species of bacteria.


It is a proprietary blend of nature’s most powerful oil eating microbes, harvested from some of the most extreme and oil prone environments around the globe. With over one hundred billion microbes per gram, our formula ensures rapid remediation. Since our microbes are cultivated on Texas sweet crude oil and Gulf of Mexico seawater as a food source, they are ideally suited for the Deepwater Horizon spill.

Congressional Testimony of Heather E. Baird, Vice President, Corporate Communications ~ MicroSorb Environmental Products, Inc. United States Senate ~ June 17, 2010


More info here: The use of bioaugmentation .....


That's just one company, I'd reckon there are more around. But it's enough evidence for our debate, innit?


There is evidence for bioaugmentation but not for any 'oil-eating-man-made-bacteria' that has been modified into a flesh eating one.





a reply to: Opportunia

Thank you for that, but if you check page 2 somebody has already posted about the synthetic microbe. This bacterium has not been created to eat oil and has never been released in the ocean. This bacterium has a genome which includes only the essential genes for survival and reproduction. With this work they are trying to harness synthetic life, which would be a great topic to discuss but unfortunately it's got nothing to do with the OP.

You can read the original study here: Design and synthesis of a minimal bacterial genome




posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: FamCore

When you read that 2/3rds of the oceans will be turned to blood and you read in real time

According to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC), up to 40% of the residents of the territories adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico have become infected with severe respiratory and skin diseases, and one in four residents is planning to pack up and leave in the nearest future. journal-neo.org...
you get the impression that this may actually have a direct relation to it . Oh and you may have made that up but may be very close to the truth of the matter


The "report" that was linked is pretty much a fabrication. If you look at the links, you'll notice that they pretty much googled for a source as they typed it and just lined that (the news story on the flesh-eating bacteria in the Gulf actually links to an older story with an entirely different bacteria, for example.) I looked at several of the blogger's articles on this site (the person is described as an "expert" on the Middle East without giving any real qualifications) and this style of reporting - not linking to hard data - is pretty typical.



posted on Sep, 20 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

Thank you for having this pleasant discussion with me.


MicroSorb says their microbes are cultivated only, that's right. Very good, so I searched for other players around and found this Synthetic Genomics connection and more:


He also pointed out that right now the company’s proposal to select and introduce designer oil-eating microbes into the Gulf is in BP’s hands. “It’s in their pipeline, but we are not waiting for a response. We know our approach stands the best chance to make bioremediation work, and we are proceeding accordingly. ”

Can Microbes Help Stem the BP Oil-Spill Disaster?



New form of microbiology? Sounds suspicious to me...


Research by the Berkeley Lab and others determined that indigenous microbes, including a previously unknown species, degraded the oil plume to virtually undetectable levels within a few weeks after the damaged wellhead was sealed. Another study showed that the methane and other gaseous compounds in the water column were also almost completely degraded within three months.

Microbes Reduced Adverse Impact of BP, Exxon Valdez Spills

I'll take everything back, there's only lots of circumstancial evidence around. Kinda fishy nonetheless, innit?




posted on Sep, 22 2016 @ 04:38 AM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
I'll take everything back, there's only lots of circumstancial evidence around. Kinda fishy nonetheless, innit?


That's the thing, I don't see anything fishy. The bacteria eating the oil is natural. The flesh eating bacteria is natural. They have been trying for at least 6 years to create a synthetic microbe and it's no secret....... what do you think is suspicious?



posted on Sep, 26 2016 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

I think they released GMO microbes (not synthetics) during the clean up, a 'previously unknownd species' and thus a completely 'new form of microbiology'. There's your possible connection to this recent hydrocarbon eating bacteria situation, which is precisely what some people from that area believe to be the case.

Time to ask BP nicely for a full disclosure, innit?




posted on Sep, 26 2016 @ 12:33 PM
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Here's a wiki on it.

Synthia



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