It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

On this Day in History:

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 09:08 AM
link   
On this day in history President Mc Kinley died after being shot on September 6, 1901, by anarchist Leon Czolgosz. No conspiracy here just want to post some history for this day.






On September 6, McKinley visited Niagara Falls, and then returned, against Cortelyou's wishes, to the Exposition's Temple of Music to shake hands with well-wishers. Each person passed by a phalanx of guards to greet the president, but many entered with handkerchiefs in their hands, which they had used to wipe their brows in the hot sun outside. Furthermore, the chief of security's place beside the president had been taken by an Exposition VIP. Czolgosz had wrapped a handkerchief around his hand and revolver, so that it resembled a bandaged hand. The guards, distracted by another man they thought suspicious, let the assassin pass unmolested. Czolgosz simply walked up and shot the president point blank in the chest (which ricocheted off a button) and a second time in the stomach. The force of the bullets propelled McKinley backward onto the floor, while the soldiers fell on Czolgosz and unarmed him. The president uttered, "Don't hurt him," and "My wife ... be careful how you tell her." McKinley was transferred by ambulance to the Exposition hospital, and Czolgosz was taken to a local prison. The physician on call, a gynecologist by training, performed the surgery, sewing up the entrance and exit wounds in the president's stomach, but was unable to locate the bullet. Gangrene quickly set in, and Vice President Theodore Roosevelt, campaign manager Mark Hanna, and other colleagues and friends called at the president's bedside. On September 14, 1901, William McKinley became the third president in 36 years to die of an assassin's bullet. Roosevelt, who had hurriedly returned to Buffalo the day before, was sworn in as the nation's youngest president (42). After a state funeral in Washington, D.C., McKinley was buried in his hometown of Canton, Ohio, on September 19, as citizens across the country observed five minutes of silence at 3:30 in the afternoon.


I do find this historic date especially interesting because John Hinkley Jr, the man who shot Reagan, was recently set free after almost 40yrs. Interesting.............What says ATS?

www.nytimes.com...




posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 09:21 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

I never knew so many presidents had died from assassins. History is great because you can always learn more about it. Thank you lostbook!!



posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 11:39 AM
link   
Thanks! It makes a nice change in reading!

When we're taught history, they have to gloss over so many things because of the denseness of details that exist. I'm trying to teach a short section on the Crusades (4 classes) and the material I have about just the First Crusade and its causes could last 4 months of lessons.



posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 10:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: Byrd
Thanks! It makes a nice change in reading!

When we're taught history, they have to gloss over so many things because of the denseness of details that exist. I'm trying to teach a short section on the Crusades (4 classes) and the material I have about just the First Crusade and its causes could last 4 months of lessons.


Good luck with that. The Crusades are a very convoluted mess of plots and sub-plots that expands the globe, in my opinion. We are still dealing with remnants of it in today's world.



posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 10:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: Byrd
Thanks! It makes a nice change in reading!

When we're taught history, they have to gloss over so many things because of the denseness of details that exist. I'm trying to teach a short section on the Crusades (4 classes) and the material I have about just the First Crusade and its causes could last 4 months of lessons.


Good luck with that. The Crusades are a very convoluted mess of plots and sub-plots that expands the globe, in my opinion. We are still dealing with remnants of it in today's world.


The crusades were pointless. If anything the Greeks lost. Romans lost. Celts lost. Almost all white nations that were not under Christianity lost. All White people were dragged into this dumb crusade of storming Eastward by Christians. Only ones that weren't dumb enough were Slavic which is today modern Russia. 4 crusades is a hard lesson learnt. Shall we start 5th? Hell no.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 05:54 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Im a little late but im posting anyway as it was huge - Battle Of Salamis (defeat of Xerxes navy). Basically gave Ancient Greece time to breathe and re stock.



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 06:13 AM
link   

originally posted by: Byrd
Thanks! It makes a nice change in reading!

When we're taught history, they have to gloss over so many things because of the denseness of details that exist. I'm trying to teach a short section on the Crusades (4 classes) and the material I have about just the First Crusade and its causes could last 4 months of lessons.


Hi Byrd, that is a very complicated topic but you could boil it down to a few essentials:

1) Pressures on the Commenus Dynasty (as it was to become) in Byzantium from the Seljuk Turks (Alp Arslan, etc).
2) Religious bigotry of Count Raymond of Tolouse. The Pope called for Crusade, following Alexius Commenus pleas' for help and Count Raymond whipped that into a religious fervour (also see Peter the Hermit). This was probably also linked it religious political posturing for influence with the next Pope / senior cardinals.
3) Time of the Normans. Whilst this may not seem an important cause, it is worth remembering that Normans in this period were busy conquering Southern Italy, Sicily, England, etc and carving out huge fiefdoms for themselves - it was the "Norman Way". A good example is Bohemond confronting the Muslims at the behest of the Armenians.......with 300 knights (and winning siginificantly).



posted on Sep, 23 2016 @ 06:19 AM
link   
check out crac des chevaliers, after the first incarnation crumbled under an earthquake, this monster was built.
survived the crusades, the current jihadi baddies tried to destroy it and failed, the syrian army have shelled it believing daesh were hiding in it and, we have bombed it.
satellite reports show a chapel may be damaged.
we don't build 'em like that anymore.




top topics



 
6

log in

join