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A timeline of Earth's average temperature from the Ice Age onward in one XKCD comic

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posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

I asked who is trying to do this:



I just find it hillarious to take a snippet out of the end of the iceage and try to correlate that model to trends over 4 billion years.


No answer?
Or was that just a very poor attempt at a strawman argument?


edit on 9/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: Phage

The ops source no?


No.

20,000 years, as I said. As the comic says if you click on the link.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: Phage

See post just above yours.

A big picture, easy to understand..

Good work Schuyler !



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: M5xaz

It uses the same antiquated ice core data. From a single location.
Got anything more recent?
edit on 9/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: Byrd

A lot of people have never even heard of paleoclimatology which makes it a bit difficult to have conversations on the subject.


I know.

I hoped the topic might turn to the impact of the climate on civilization and how the temperature might have influenced health and plant choices and population size (etc) and some interesting assumptions could be made.

No such luck (sigh.)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Phage



Yes, Earth gets hot, then it gets cold, then it gets hot again, then it gets cold and the "cycle" repeats with or without humans

Tell me, what caused all the previous warming and cooling trends ?



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: Byrd




The Earth itself records it. You simply have to learn to read the documents -- in this case, mud cores, soil horizons, tree rings, river beds, etc, etc.
although you can get a signal from all proxies ,they all have their own problems and being consistent seems to be a issue with extending the record . That is why climate researchers have been caught cherry picking points in time and stitching other records to their work . It was called "Mikes Nature Trick " in the climate gate emails and the graph that produced the now debunked hockey stick .

For a good analysis on proxies and their statistical significance see climateaudit.org...



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: Discotech

Discotech, you are aware that CO2 is way, way above the maximum of that chart you've linked... right?

So... kinda old data, no?



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:01 PM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: Phage



Yes, Earth gets hot, then it gets cold, then it gets hot again, then it gets cold and the "cycle" repeats with or without humans

Tell me, what caused all the previous warming and cooling trends ?




My guess is volcanic activity. We saw what krakatoa did. Imagine 15 volcanoes going off at once.
edit on 13-9-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: Discotech

I didn't actually know the topic was human influences on climate, more on the reverse.

But in any case, a number of things affect climate on a large scale. For example; total solar irradiance, solar insolation as affected by orbital and axial factors, volcanic activity, and, oh yes, changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases.

There are also internal factors which affect climatological patterns but don't actually affect the average global temperature.


edit on 9/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Discotech

I didn't actually know the topic was human influences on climate, more on the reverse.

But in any case, a number of things affect climate on a large scale. For example; total solar irradiance, solar insolation as affected by orbital and axial factors, volcanic activity. And, oh yes, changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases.

There are also internal factors which affect climatological patterns but don't actually increase the average global temperature.




Well said.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: M5xaz
a reply to: Byrd

Sigh.
Getting facts from "comics"....liberals....

Try real data and some perspective:



You can clearly see humans have had minimal impact. The lion's share of the rise ( that continues to this day) is what you can naturally expect coming out of an ice age.... and,no, prehistoric humans living in caves can no more affect temperature than they can influence volcanos...


You must not have looked at the comic?

It very clearly said "average temperature of the Earth."

Both your chart and XKCD show the exact same thing. Yours isn't average smoothed.

Having said that, don't you think it's interesting how our civilizations started taking off once things got warmer?

And if you did the average and looked at the comic, you will see that it actually shows the Little Ice Age (which can't be seen on the chart you show) and the Medieval warming period.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:07 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: M5xaz

It uses the same antiquated ice core data. From a single location.
Got anything more recent?


"Antiquated ice core data" That's an oxymoron, is it not? Why would I want "more recent" data? Seems to me it would be better to get data from further back--even MORE "antiquated." But do I have anything more recent? Sure:



Now why do you suppose they did that? Do you know the reason they decided to "hide the decline"? Yeah, I know it's not "ice core data." Do you know what it is? One more question: Why are we admitting data from a comic and dismissing data published in the Journal of Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol:10:226."
edit on 9/13/2016 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

"Our civilization started taking off once things got warmer"

AFTER.
Precisely.

The warming was beneficial and we did not cause it.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

Do you know what it is?

Yes I do. It was a decline in the correspondence between tree ring data from central England (not, as your source claims, global temperatures) and actual temperature measurements. Data which, in the mid twentieth century went wonky and stopped corresponding to actual summertime temperature data. Up until then it seemed to be a pretty good proxy for temperatures.


Oh yes, nothing was "hidden".



Tell me, you don't think that things are getting warmer?
edit on 9/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes a combination, not solely based off greenhouse gasses

Comparing CO2 in warm and cold periods in geologic history

Does a good of highlighting that while contributory, CO2 is not the sole reason for warming or cooling.



The thing to bear in mind is that these are proxies, not empirical measurements, and there’s no error/uncertainty shown. Of course at the present, we have ~ 390ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere, and that is nothing I dispute, not does any other skeptic I know of. What is clear from this study though is that our current period of increased CO2 is riding on the back of natural variability of CO2 concentration, which has been observed to occur with regularity over the past 1.5 million years. Of course the question arises as to how much the present concentrations will affect our slide into the next glaciation, if at all. If we are lucky, our “geoengineering” of the planet with some extra CO2 may very well be a lucky break for humanity. Notice that those peaks in CO2 and SST, the most recent of which is the very brief period of the rise of man, are quite short compared with the much longer periods of cooler temperatures.


And worryingly



That minimum pCO2 920,000 years ago of 155ppm comes dangerously close to the value at which photosynthetic function shuts down, said to be around 140-150ppm. Earth came close to losing its plant life then.


Earth could been very very different if levels dropped lower, what caused that drop ? And more importantly could the drop be cyclical ? Because even at 1.5million years of data, it's still smallscale compared to Earths entire timeline.

However one could also quite easily argue there is no cycle and it's completely random due to random celestial and volcanic events



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: Discotech

The thing is, we know where the CO2 is coming from. It's not from volcanoes. It's not from the ocean. It's from us. Well, actually from the combustion of fossil fuels. Nothing natural about it.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: Phage

But the CO2 on its own is NOT causing the warming trend, therefore one can argue that man is not causing the warming, despite others wanting us to believe it, none of us are arguing that there isn't an increase in CO2 what we're arguing is that the increase in CO2 is not the sole contributor to the warming trend therefore we are not responsible for something which is entirely cyclical in nature



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: Discotech

What other things are contributing to the warming trend?
Besides of course, feedback effects resulting from the warming. Like increased water vapor content.

edit on 9/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: M5xaz

True, we did not cause the end of the last glacial period.
That is attributable to orbital and axial conditions. Things which, all else being equal, should be showing us cooling not warming.



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