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Worlds second largest meteorite unearthed in Argentina.

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posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: imsoconfused

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: schuyler

Got a link for "four feet across" and damage equivalent to "twenty tons of dynamite"? As far as I know, Kilotons of nuclear weapons don't make a crater a mile across.


Sigh. I SAW it last month. I had my picture taken with it and that is my estimation of its size having touched it and stood by it. But I spent two seconds on google and got 1.5 million hits. Here's a couple so you don't have to work too hard:

meteorcrater.com...
en.wikipedia.org...
www.barringercrater.com...


Holy crap that was only 4 feet across? This thing must of been biblical.


What's left is 4 feet. I added a pic of it. There are undoubtedly fragments still below ground. The theory is that it shattered on impact and this is the biggest piece they've found. It was traveling at 26,000 mph, so the kinetic energy must have been very dramatic.




posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: imsoconfused

It seems the area is littered with meteorites

Campo del Cielo


A crater field of at least 26 craters was found in the area, with the largest being 115×91 meters. The field covered an area of 3×18.5 kilometers with an associated strewn area of smaller meteorites extending farther by about 60 kilometres (37 mi). At least two of the craters contained thousands of small iron pieces. Such an unusual distribution suggests that a large body entered the Earth's atmosphere and broke into pieces which fell to the ground. The size of the main body is estimated as larger than 4 meters in diameter. The fragments contain an unusually high density of inclusions for an iron meteorite, which might have facilitated the disintegration of the original meteorite. Samples of charred wood were taken from beneath the meteorite fragments and analyzed for carbon-14 composition. The results indicate the date of the fall to be around 4,200–4,700 years ago, or 2,200–2,700 years BC


If you look at the area on maps, it's heavily cultivated which could be the reason we don't see any distinct massive craters

However even the largest of impacts don't always leave something visible for us like the Chicxulub crater



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 02:48 PM
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The results indicate the date of the fall to be around 4,200–4,700 years ago, or 2,200–2,700 years BC


what year was the biblical flood for Noah's Ark? ACCORDING TO ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORIAN JOSEPHUS, along with Irish archbishop and chronologist James Ussher, Bible historians and most conservative Christian scholars, the Flood of Noah's time occurred between 2500 BC and 2300 BC — probably close to 2348 BC

Just saying.
edit on 13-9-2016 by imsoconfused because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 02:59 PM
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That one won't fit through the old tile saw.......awesomeness



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: imsoconfused

What are you saying ?

That a meteor that hit solid land, magically caused the great flood ?

Or are you trying to say that the meteor landed in the ocean and was somehow transported to land ?

Here's what happens when meteors/asteroids hit water




posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

You saw a fragment, not the whole meteorite that made the Arizona crater. That tiny bit in the flicker link is a fragment.

From the link you also provided: its not '20 tons of dynamite', its twenty million. Thats 2o megatons equivalent for conventional explosives.


The spectacular result of the collision that rocked the American Southwest with the energy of more than 20 million tons of TNT can be explored first-hand just outside the Discovery Center.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: imsoconfused

What are you saying ?

That a meteor that hit solid land, magically caused the great flood ?

Or are you trying to say that the meteor landed in the ocean and was somehow transported to land ?

Here's what happens when meteors/asteroids hit water



Lol I was just being stupid.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:12 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
The meteorite that caused Meteor Crater in Arizona is maybe four feet across. It created a hole a mile wide with the force of 20 tons of dynamite which wiped out anything within several miles. The "rest if it" disintegrated on impact. This was 50,000 years ago.

So yeah, this thing probably did a lot of damage since it is so much larger.


I always heard it was the size of a bus. Guess I'll have to do some research now...got a link to the info?



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: BlueShaman
Shouldn't there be a huge crater around that meteorite? Almost looks like it was brought in from somewhere else and buried there.


Even one that size would be slowed by friction to free fall speed before it impacted the ground.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: amicktd

originally posted by: schuyler
The meteorite that caused Meteor Crater in Arizona is maybe four feet across. It created a hole a mile wide with the force of 20 tons of dynamite which wiped out anything within several miles. The "rest if it" disintegrated on impact. This was 50,000 years ago.

So yeah, this thing probably did a lot of damage since it is so much larger.


I always heard it was the size of a bus. Guess I'll have to do some research now...got a link to the info?


I was thinking teh one that killed the dinosaurs was the size of a bus.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: schuyler

Got a link for "four feet across" and damage equivalent to "twenty tons of dynamite"? As far as I know, Kilotons of nuclear weapons don't make a crater a mile across.

Sedan Crater





The meteorite was made of nickel-iron and is estimated to have been about 45 meters (150 ft) across, weighing about 270,000 metric tons (300,000 tons).


Source



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: schuyler

You saw a fragment, not the whole meteorite that made the Arizona crater. That tiny bit in the flicker link is a fragment.

From the link you also provided: its not '20 tons of dynamite', its twenty million. Thats 2o megatons equivalent for conventional explosives.


The only fragment that is left, yes. That's what they dug up. There ARE no other pieces of it. So sorry I used the wrong nomenclature. YOU are the one who claimed A-bombs don't make that kind of crater, yet if it's 20 MEGATONS, that's the approximate size of the Nagasaki blast, so why would you claim a mere "20 tons" wouldn't do that?

What's REALLY strange that you take issue with any of it. Good Lord, what a first world problem. ENJOY THE HOLES. And, if you have anything to actually CONTRIBUTE about meteor craters, by all means do so.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: imsoconfused

originally posted by: amicktd

originally posted by: schuyler
The meteorite that caused Meteor Crater in Arizona is maybe four feet across. It created a hole a mile wide with the force of 20 tons of dynamite which wiped out anything within several miles. The "rest if it" disintegrated on impact. This was 50,000 years ago.

So yeah, this thing probably did a lot of damage since it is so much larger.


I always heard it was the size of a bus. Guess I'll have to do some research now...got a link to the info?


I was thinking teh one that killed the dinosaurs was the size of a bus.


That one was approx. 6 miles across and left a crater approx. 110 miles across.
edit on 13-9-2016 by amicktd because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: schuyler


YOU are the one who claimed A-bombs don't make that kind of crater, yet if it's 20 MEGATONS, that's the approximate size of the Nagasaki blast, so why would you claim a mere "20 tons" wouldn't do that?

I didn't state it was "four feet across" or "20 tons of TNT" equivalent, you did.

Sorry to take contention with your 'facts' , if you're going present them, at least get them right.

Meteor facts

By the way, Nagasaki was not a "twenty megaton" equivalent, more like 18-23 kiloton yield.

Third down in here, "Fat Man"



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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Is it hollow and filled with dead aliens and advanced technology?

Because that would be cool.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: amicktd

Thank you, beat me to it.

150 feet across and 2.5 megatons equivalent is a best guesstimate. Nobody was there to measure it as it went in.

Love to have been a hundred miles away, though.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 04:00 PM
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It seems to be in rather shallow soil ? I would think 30 tons would blast quite a bit deeper of a crater...



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: 191stMIDET
A thirty Tonne Meteor impacting the earth would be absolutely devastating, like blackened skies devastating. The crater would be HUUUUGE!! So, here is my thinking. If this meteorite has only been in the ground for 4,000 years I don't think it actually landed there 4,000 years ago but rather is much older and was placed there 4,000 years ago. Why and how would people do that? No idea but, when that thing hit the earth traveling thousands upon thousands of miles per hour the crater would be a few miles wide and it would be nighttime for awhile because of the smoke, dust etc.


Not really. The Chelyabinsk meteor was estimated to be well over 12,000 tons and all it did was blow out some windows. An estimation of the Tunguska impactor, if an asteroid rather than a comet, puts it around 21,000 tons, like the Chelyabinsk meteor it was an air burst and never made landfall.

To leave a 30 ton fragment this impactor had to have been quite large indeed. Likely being a mix of iron and rock that exploded up in the atmosphere showering the area with fragments rather than making one huge crater.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: chiefsmom
a reply to: schuyler

Wow.

So, with this one being so much bigger, and only approx, 4000 years ago, It could have wiped out a whole lot of people, if the area had been populated.

It is interesting to think about what people would have thought back then, seeing this shooting across the sky. And what would have it been like, to come to the area, say a week or a month later, and find everything gone, and not know why?


They would've understandably thought it was a dragon with a very long snake tail...
Looking at you Aztecs and Chinese!!!

-Chris



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 04:30 PM
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From Wickipedia :

When a meteoroid, comet, or asteroid enters the Earth's atmosphere at a speed typically in excess of 20 km/s (72,000 km/h; 45,000 mph), aerodynamic heating of that object produces a streak of light, both from the glowing object and the trail of glowing particles that it leaves in its wake. This phenomenon is called a meteor or "shooting star". A series of many meteors appearing seconds or minutes apart and appearing to originate from the same fixed point in the sky is called a meteor shower. If that object withstands ablation from its passage through the atmosphere as a meteor and impacts with the ground, it is then called a meteorite.

I have been to the crater in Arizona and looked over the edge at the observation platform in the early 70's. I would expect something like this as a result from an object this size .....thirty tons.... ?



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