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WTF? Chelsea's Apt. Has Same Address as a Medical Facility!--Hillary's Secret Hospital?

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posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye


Clinton also affirmed her commitment to giving Americans in every state the choice of a "public-option" insurance plan — which she supported during her 2008 presidential campaign and Sanders pushed for during the ACA debate — and allowing people below Medicare age to opt into the program by offering it to those who are 55 and older.

This is another thread all together, and it will probably spawn at less 4 more threads.

First. Medicare has been rife with fraud from its conception.

2nd. What does the average person think Medicare is? Many doctors won't even accept Medicare anymore. It is an insurance, and not a very good one anymore. It only pays 80% and you have to pay an ridiculous amount for a secondary insurance that will cover absolutely nothing else but the 20% that Medicare doesn't pay.

It is not what most people think it is.




posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Not well-versed in how Medicare pays, but I recall my mom bought into Part B (?), to make it worth having.

Obviously, businesses filing false claims might not/wouldn't even bother billing for the OOP expense.


edit on 16-9-2016 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Not well-versed in how Medicare pays, but I recall my mom bought into Part B (?), to make it worth having.

Obviously, businesses filing false claims might not/wouldn't even bother billing for the OOP expense.


No can do. If they don't collect the full amount then Medicare won't pay anything.

They consider that fraud and they don't take kindly to it.



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 10:15 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn

originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Not well-versed in how Medicare pays, but I recall my mom bought into Part B (?), to make it worth having.

Obviously, businesses filing false claims might not/wouldn't even bother billing for the OOP expense.


No can do. If they don't collect the full amount then Medicare won't pay anything.

They consider that fraud and they don't take kindly to it.


But if you file fraudulent documents to evade an audit...

...which is what the DOJ said TransCare did.



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye

originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn

originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Not well-versed in how Medicare pays, but I recall my mom bought into Part B (?), to make it worth having.

Obviously, businesses filing false claims might not/wouldn't even bother billing for the OOP expense.


No can do. If they don't collect the full amount then Medicare won't pay anything.

They consider that fraud and they don't take kindly to it.


But if you file fraudulent documents to evade an audit...

...which is what the DOJ said TransCare did.

May be why they got caught.



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 10:48 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn

originally posted by: MotherMayEye

originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn

originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Not well-versed in how Medicare pays, but I recall my mom bought into Part B (?), to make it worth having.

Obviously, businesses filing false claims might not/wouldn't even bother billing for the OOP expense.


No can do. If they don't collect the full amount then Medicare won't pay anything.

They consider that fraud and they don't take kindly to it.


But if you file fraudulent documents to evade an audit...

...which is what the DOJ said TransCare did.

May be why they got caught.



In the case of TransCare...it was a qui tam lawsuit -- a whistleblower exposed them.

Larry Kaplan, Financial Director for TransCare, gave the info to the DOJ.

And he was the beneficiary to the settlement for his 'whistleblowing.'

AND he was a campaign contributor along with three MetroCare employees in what looks to be part of the 'strawman' illegal campaign contribution scheme that Zakheim was caught up in.

Medicare didn't uncover it in an audit or through oversight. It was a whistleblower. One that I suspect was a willing participant in some illegal campaign contribution activity.

ETA: Medicare may have rules...but I don't believe they are vigilant about enforcing them. I don't think Medicare asks enough questions...perhaps that's why you (and I) have always heard that Medicare fraud is rampant.



edit on 16-9-2016 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 11:08 PM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye

Medicare didn't uncover it in an audit or through oversight. It was a whistleblower. One that I suspect was a willing participant in some illegal campaign contribution activity.

ETA: Medicare may have rules...but I don't believe they are vigilant about enforcing them. I don't think Medicare asks enough questions...perhaps that's why you (and I) have always heard that Medicare fraud is rampant.

They have taken other actions to rein in the fraud. It looks like it might be working.


Blowing the whistle on Medicare fraud may become dramatically more lucrative. On April 29, 2013, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced its intention to elevate the maximum payout for whistleblowers by a multiple of nearly one million. Specifically, the HHS's Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it would raise the ceiling for whistleblower payouts to nearly $10 million from the current cap of $1,000. By revising the Incentive Reward Program provisions in § 420.405 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the proposal would entitle any Medicare fraud whistleblower whose tip leads to a recovery to 15 percent of the overpayments recovered, with a cap of $9.9 million. The goal, according to CMS, is to "increase the incentive for individuals to report information on individuals and entities that have or are engaged in sanctionable conduct; improve our ability to detect new fraud schemes; and help us ensure that fraudulent entities and individuals do not enroll in or maintain their enrollment in the Medicare program."

www.mondaq.com...
edit on 16-9-2016 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Or, it's just a new avenue to get criminal fraud into civil court and out of a criminal court, allowing businesses engaged in Medicare fraud to settle with whistleblowers (willing participants) at a significantly smaller hit.

Also, in TransCare's case...they didn't even offer a defense that might incriminate them. They simply settled with trusty Larry Kaplan.

My takeaway from the DOJ/TransCare settlement is that TransCare was spared millions and a criminal prosecution by settling on the qui tam/whistleblower civil case.
edit on 16-9-2016 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 16 2016 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye


Or, it's just a new avenue to get criminal fraud into civil court and out of a criminal court, allowing businesses engaged in Medicare fraud to settle with whistleblowers (willing participants) at a significantly smaller hit.

Smart move. No matter how you shake it, it seems to always come back to the money.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 08:20 PM
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Might be a useful tool for you, MME.

NEW YORK MEDICAID FRAUD CONTROL UNIT 2008

www.ag.ny.gov...



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 08:53 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Thanks! I will dig into this tomorrow. I am half-assed dabbling in the birther stuff on ATS today, but my head and heart are with my dog, Roxy, who died this morning. I'm too mentally/emotionally exhausted to be productive about this very important line of research.

I'm coming back to it after a good night's sleep though.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 09:13 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

So sorry for the loss of your dog. It hurts so much to lose a beloved pet.

Your research has been amazing on this thread. Please return when you get some emotional and mental rest.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 09:19 PM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: IAMTAT

Thanks! I will dig into this tomorrow. I am half-assed dabbling in the birther stuff on ATS today, but my head and heart are with my dog, Roxy, who died this morning. I'm too mentally/emotionally exhausted to be productive about this very important line of research.

I'm coming back to it after a good night's sleep though.


Family Aides Services is listed with/or as another name for Metrocare under Robert Silberiny
It's President plead guilty to fraud.

www.ag.ny.gov...
Bottom of page 12 & 13:



Family Aides Home Care Companies Reached $19.7 Million Settlement to Resolve Allegations of Overbilling; Former Owner and President Convicted of Stealing Medicaid Dollars Following a multi-year investigation and audit, William C. Schnell, the former owner, president, and sole shareholder of Family Aides, Inc., Family Aides Certified Services of New York City, Inc., and Family Aides Certified Services of Nassau, Suffolk, Inc., pleaded
guilty to grand larceny in the third degree on April 19, 2007.

On August 18, 2008, the court
sentenced Schnell to a conditional discharge and ordered him to pay restitution of $212,118
and penalties of $424,236. Schnell is now barred for life from participating in the Medicaid
and Medicare programs. The NYMFCU also obtained from the Family Aides companies,
which employ thousands of workers and serve patients in the New York metropolitan area
and Long Island, a $19.7 million settlement that resolved overbilling allegations.

MORE...

www.ag.ny.gov...

This comes from FR: PST-59
www.freerepublic.com...

EDIT;
SEE ALSO POST 74
freerepublic.com...

edit on 17-9-2016 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-9-2016 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-9-2016 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 09:20 PM
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Most interesting.




posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 09:25 PM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye
a reply to: IAMTAT

Thanks! I will dig into this tomorrow. I am half-assed dabbling in the birther stuff on ATS today, but my head and heart are with my dog, Roxy, who died this morning. I'm too mentally/emotionally exhausted to be productive about this very important line of research.

I'm coming back to it after a good night's sleep though.


So sorry you lost your dog. Get some rest.



posted on Sep, 17 2016 @ 10:22 PM
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Thanks, guys.

This was my sweet girl, btw:

In Memory of Roxy



posted on Sep, 18 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

I need to correct something. The Whitman was formerly a fabric showroom and Plumber's Union headquarters before Mitchell Holdings bought the building.

I brought up the wrong Whitman building on the waybackmachine.



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 08:59 AM
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I can't help but wonder if Robert Silberiny is an alias.
Robert Silber 'in NY'?



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 09:18 AM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
I can't help but wonder if Robert Silberiny is an alias.
Robert Silber 'in NY'?


I thought it was 'Silbering?'

I got that from this link: NYC Corporate Entity Database


Chief Executive Officer
ROBERT S SILBERING
C/O WHITE AND WILLIAMS LLP
ONE PENN PLAZA
NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 10119
Principal Executive Office
METROCARE GIVERS INC.
120 WEST JOHN ST
HICKSVILLE, NEW YORK, 11801


And I wondered if he is an attorney (with White & Williams, maybe?) based on this NYT story:


But in the course of digging through 6,000 pounds of the carrots, Federal drug agents and New York police officers also found 3,586 pounds of coc aine, the authorities said. It took them five hours Friday night and Saturday morning. It was the largest drug seizure in New York City in the 1990's, the city's Special Narcotics Prosecutor, Robert S. Silbering, said.


Link to NYT

If he is an attorney, I wonder if he is/was simply handling the business for someone else.

I noticed that many people who get caught filing false claims with Medicare are prohibited from ever actually operating businesses that file claims with Medicare again. They have to find others to handle the business.

I would love to know if that Special Narcotics Prosecutor, Robert S. Silbering, is the same Robert S. Silbering.



edit on 19-9-2016 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2016 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

If you were involved in an organized crime ring that dealt in narcotics, it would be fabulous to have a connection with the Special Narcotics Prosecutor.

They could not only help bury investigations, but they could also pursue the competition to help corner the market.

Obviously, that's all just speculation...I have no idea if it's actually the same Robert S. Silbering.




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