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New Footage of Possible Tasmanian Tiger

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posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 06:56 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Yeah on that I see what you are saying. But there is that blur effect. I've been having trouble deciding between blur or furriness. It looks odd and not exactly like fur so much as some strange video distortion, but I can't rule out very slightly longer fur than would be expected.




posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: Puppylove

I think the number one reason I'm more on the side of a blur effect is just that, man the way the tail tapers and is held is so classically Thylacine.

It may just be hopeful thinking. I do tend to geek out anytime a living Thylacine story leaks out, but that one aspect is just so convincing.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: Puppylove

I jumped on laptop to have a look.

Yeah, I can now see what you (and others) are saying about the tail being thinner and tapered. Still looks furrier than I would expect. I dunno. I still withhold judgement as its just too unclear to be certain. I mean, it could be, but it also might not be.

I think I'll just happily sit on the fence until proven otherwise.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

I'm on the fence as well. We definitely need more.

I am, however happy to have more plausible evidence they still exist and the hope we may see a living one once again someday.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:23 PM
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Wow!
The hind legs/hips are also very tiger like.
Is there a background to the video? I wonder what the person saw before they got the camera out



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: Puppylove

It would be nice, but you'd end up seeing some moronic celeb (Paris Hilton type) keeping one as a "pet".



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

Actually there are lots of sightings of them. More than you would expect when it's an animal that if still alive has been hunted to near extinction by humans and thus likely has learned to avoid us. Something most animals are really good at doing in their natural environment.

If sightings are becoming more common to the point we're potentially getting video evidence, it could be a good sign they are making a come back. For animals who's survival has become dependent on avoiding human contact to start exploring out more into areas loaded with the scent of man they are likely under some kind of pressure to explore beyond their safe zones.

What this could mean is pressures due to overpopulation for the territories they've been hiding in, thus forcing expansion.

Then again could be hopeful thinking as well. Only time can tell.

But not seeing an animal all over does not mean they aren't there, especially if they have a vested interest in as well as experience avoiding man. If these are Thylicines, these are the descendants of survivors of a mass culling by man. It's very possibly they not only know the threat we present but as survivors are especially equipped avoid that threat.

Also it's a tasmanian tiger, taz devil would be a tasmanian devil. Not extinct at all but suffering from a stranger contagion currently

edit on 9/6/2016 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:48 PM
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I always found it hard to believe they were 100% hunted into extinction. this is a big country, with so much secluded land. And they were not just in the island state of Tasmania.

I think it's highly possible there were a few small pockets that kept a small number of the species alive, and out of view.
Think about thick scrub land where the animals sense you long before you even knew they were there.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: kangawoo

Exactly.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Not a bright Idea, from what I remember they have one hell of a bite. I remember seeing a story about some guy hunting them with his dog. The dog cornered the tiger and with a single gaping bite the tiger killed the dog and cracked it's skull wide open.

If you know anything about a dogs skull, this is one hell of an impressive feet of jaw strength for a creature that sized. Especially as was supposed to be a comparably large sized hunting dog.
edit on 9/6/2016 by Puppylove because: grammar and spelling



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 08:29 PM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
Oops
You are right of course
But they do look like dogs, easily mistaken for a dog


That is the result of convergent evolution.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 08:38 PM
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Sadly this is the kind of subjects that really interests me and draws me in, but always result in small threads with little interests. I almost posted this story myself when I saw it, I was so excited, but well, was beaten to it.

Sadly Thylacines can't compete with the chaos of a Reptilian Queen and a giant beast of an Oompa Loompa wearing a wig to pass as a human, both running for president of the United States and being top contenders.
edit on 9/6/2016 by Puppylove because: grammar and spelling



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Remarkable isn't it? Even as a child I was fascinated by images with side by side comparisons of placental and marsupial mammals like this one.

Considering that the last common ancestor of placentals and marsupials is thought to have lived possibly as early as the Jurassic, it's easy to wonder if convergent (or perhaps more appropriate in this case, parallel) evolution suggests a sort of deep structure that could almost be taken as evidence of some top-down mechanism.

However, it seems far more likely that even with tens of million of years in between, what we're actually seeing is that because they started with a common form, branches in the separate lineages responded to similar selective pressures with similar adaptations.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Raggedyman
Oops
You are right of course
But they do look like dogs, easily mistaken for a dog


That is the result of convergent evolution.


That would be a wild and outlandish assumption without a single drop of empirical evidence and huge amounts of faith

Just saying

I wouldn't be surprised if there were a few Tassi Tigers around somewhere



posted on Sep, 7 2016 @ 01:27 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I watched a much grainier version of this the other day and scratched my head a lot. Must have played it a dozen times and a degree of pareidolia was in play because the head went from being obviously, unusually narrow to being naturally broad and then back again. Your version is much better.

The tail and its length versus width lend themselves to a comparison with the famous thylacine footage.

I don't believe there are any thylacines left which, in my mind, rules out the Tazzy Tiger as an explanation. Having this critter in an urban setting makes it highly unlikely too even if there is a surviving population.

I think it's likely to be a cat or dog. I'm erring to that because of *where* it's come from in the footage. That's pure front yard so it's walked/stalked across several yards of open ground (visible to other homes) in broad daylight.



posted on Sep, 7 2016 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: theantediluvian

I watched a much grainier version of this the other day and scratched my head a lot. Must have played it a dozen times and a degree of pareidolia was in play because the head went from being obviously, unusually narrow to being naturally broad and then back again. Your version is much better.

The tail and its length versus width lend themselves to a comparison with the famous thylacine footage.

I don't believe there are any thylacines left which, in my mind, rules out the Tazzy Tiger as an explanation. Having this critter in an urban setting makes it highly unlikely too even if there is a surviving population.

I think it's likely to be a cat or dog. I'm erring to that because of *where* it's come from in the footage. That's pure front yard so it's walked/stalked across several yards of open ground (visible to other homes) in broad daylight.


Maybe it is sick or very hungry, so it made it's way into the suburb. It's a very lush and established street and could literally back onto the Adelaide hills.
Sorry for some reason I cannot upload an image atm. Google image "Adelaide hills"
looks like some good Thylacine area



posted on Sep, 7 2016 @ 01:54 AM
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The head looked like a horse then a rat to me, lol go figure. Something about the face or eyes got me.

Long head anyway and cool tail.

So is there anything a taz tiger could cross breed with?

The vid does put some weight on it and like they said, the color is pretty solid.


it would be great if they were still around.






posted on Sep, 7 2016 @ 01:57 AM
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a reply to: kangawoo

Wow, that place looks beautiful! It's like Tuscany over there. Really nice.



posted on Sep, 7 2016 @ 02:22 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

There is video floating around the net that does show a Thylacine walking across some rocks which was filmed in Tassi if my memory serves me correctly.



posted on Sep, 7 2016 @ 04:31 AM
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Been a lot of rain around the area in the last few months. Good chance they could have found a foot/paw print if they looked.



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