It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

Truckers block Calais to demand closure of migrant camp

page: 2
23
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 10:57 AM
link   
Why are they letting them across European boarders in the first place and then why are they letting them build camps around Calais, the french are saying it's Great Britains problem but they shouldn't be allowing this to happen in France in the first place. 90% of these people are not Syrians fleeing oppression they are just economic migrants trying to urn a quick buck. Watch any video about migrants and most are young men who are only interested in money and are not interested in being a part of the society they want to reach.
Europe should also start targeting the north African coast and killing these people traffickers who are earning a boat load of money filling boats with migrants, and when boats are found in international waters they should be towed back to Africa. Families who are escaping places like Syria should be welcomed and helped but all others should be deported.
edit on 6-9-2016 by Kurokage because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 11:16 AM
link   
a reply to: verschickter

I watched about the first half of the video...what a mess!

Where are the Police?

Europe has absolutely lost it with this open border, come one come all, insanity.

Watch out North America...you're next!



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 02:35 PM
link   
a reply to: Krakatoa

I empathize with the truckers and the business community of Calais, France. Their concerns are valid. The ongoing migrant's attempts of trying to obstruct traffic in order to hop onto trucks headed to Britain as a means to slip across the English Channel has taken a toll (no pun intended) on business infrastructure and therefore causing an economic drain on the city of Calais.



Looks like the truckers have taken it upon themselves to try to put an end to the violence they are being subjected to by the migrant population in the holding camp in Calais.


Information from your link that is worth contemplating:


"We should not be misunderstood. We have nothing against migrants.We have just a lot of animosity toward the government, which does not make good decisions," Frederic Van Gansbeke, who helped organize the protest, insisted.


I agree with your sentiment about the French government taking their sweet ol' time addressing the problem. Past reports have shown that the French government seem to have difficulty finding intelligent and humanitarian ways to resolve the ongoing issues regarding the refugee camp. Again, I can relate to the animosity the truckers are feeling towards the government concerning this issue and understand why they have nothing against the migrants themselves. The truckers seem to possess a lot of empathy and true understanding, which is good.



As I see it, if someone in that camp cannot find a citizen to sponsor them, take them in, hire them, etc... then time to consider sending them back to whence they came.


The answer to the problem is not as cartoon as you suggest. There are many humanitarian angles to address such as the many children in that camp who are without parents and/or guardians fending for themselves.

From the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation:

'Children in Calais refugee 'jungle' risk falling through cracks in coming demolition', published Feb 25, 2016 12:46 PM ET

www.cbc.ca...


Staging ground

It is because of the unaccompanied children that the destruction was postponed. But a court has ruled the plan legal and so the residents are now to be evicted.

Though it has been made slightly more comfortable with the help of aid workers and donations, the so-called Jungle is no place for anyone to live, let alone children.

But it is the perfect staging ground for young and old alike to try to sneak onto a truck or a car or a train that will get them through the Channel Tunnel over to the United Kingdom, where many say they have family.

There is no other available avenue for these children to make their case for asylum.

"It doesn't have to be like this," says Pru Waldorf, volunteer and founding member of Calais Action, a grassroots U.K. group that is one of the few helping on the ground, providing everything from clothing to medical supplies. They deliver aid to the displaced as far as Greece.

The children especially, she says, deserve to be heard.

"It's a lack of political will that stops the U.K. and French governments from placing a temporary U.K. immigration outpost in Calais to process the most urgent asylum claims to Britain."



'Legitimate claims'

She says research indicates a high proportion of Calais' vulnerable — certainly the unaccompanied minors and families — "have legitimate claims for asylum in the U.K."

"These children should not have to risk death in order to find life."

But at the edge of the continent, any sympathy for asylum seekers — young or old — seems to end.

So the residents keep trying to get to the U.K.


Here is another article by the CBC published all the way back on Jan 10, 2016.

'Calais refugee camp filled with people that feel 'forgotten,' says Victoria journalist'

www.cbc.ca...


Children, teens at risk

"There's litter and debris everywhere … children are just not getting basic humanitarian aid and protection," said Derosa, who added that there is also no clean water, places to keep food sanitary, and illnesses like tuberculosis are spreading around the camp.


These migrants (most of them - not all) come from worn torn nations - utter devastation. Many of these migrants are innocent children, women and men who lost everything due to being caught in the middle of a geopolitical sh@t storm. Their entire currency of life has been forever destroyed and are simply trying to rebuild it. I empathize with them just as much as I do with the truckers...



When will enlightenment come that forced globalization will never work. It must be organic, and willful on BOTH sides.

SMH.......


There is no such thing as "forced globalization" due to the fact we live on ONE planet. Diversity is normal. What you seem to be used to is forced homogeneity which is *inorganic*. And as history has shown, it has fuelled many conflicts and wars- it has never worked.



posted on Sep, 6 2016 @ 03:17 PM
link   
a reply to: dogstar23



I'm so detached from the whole thing as a US citizen


That is ironic considering the U.S lead NATO powers are responsible for this entire mess. All citizens who live in western nations (not just the U.S) should possess some degree of interest.



Like successful immigrant waves in the US, if they're willing to work their butts off, harder than the natives, they'll make it. I'm willing to bet a lot of them are, given the opportunity. Not going to be easy though, there's a lot to overcome, but if it wasn't worthwhile, they wouldn't be there.


I agree with you that a lot of them are willing to strive to create a better life for themselves and families along with becoming a productive member of society. After all, many of them were highly educated and hard working productive people in their home countries before the wars.

Here is a story that reflects what most refugees are about:

"Syrian chocolatier opens factory in Antigonish"

www.cbc.ca...

Antigonish is a town in Nova Scotia, Canada. I encourage you to watch the lovely short video in the news article link that further demonstrates the beauty of globalization when embraced. I will post a snippet of the video below.


Picking up where he left off

Hadhad was once a successful chocolate maker in Damascus, Syria.

He owned a factory there and employed 30 people. He shipped chocolates all over the Middle East, but he lost it all to war.

When he arrived in Canada he had little but a loving family and the community of Antigonish's welcoming arms. Hundreds of people helped them establish a home but Assam Hadhad wanted to contribute and continue his life's work.

"Work is life," Tareq Hadhad explains. "You interact with your new community and develop ideas and skills."



Giving back

So he set out to start a new chocolate factory in Nova Scotia. Volunteers in Antigonish helped build the tiny shed-turned-factory and they bought his chocolates at the local market and through special orders. In turn, Hadhad donated profits to the victims of the Fort McMurray wildfires.

"Antigonish is a very caring, loving community. We embrace Syrians. I think for them it is a dream come true really and we are pleased this has happened," says long-time Antigonish resident Diane Roberts, one of 50 people who turned out for today's official opening.

Hadhad hopes to expand his company and eventually hire staff from the community. From refugee to entrepreneur, he says now he truly feels like he has arrived in Canada.










edit on 6-9-2016 by Involutionist because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2016 @ 01:58 AM
link   
From where I stand, and what I perceive, France has a characteristic (if a culture can be said to have such) that is both it's strength and it's weakness, depending upon context.

That is, the public is very outspoken and active... the middle class is not quiet nor obedient, as I am used to experiencing in the US. I have my own reactions to that waver between seeing it as something close to the fits of spoiled children to a admirable refusal to be abused by the forces of official power. It is a rather schizo thing.

I end up seeing that there might be something to the argument that the lower classes or "typical middle class" civilian might not have enough education, knowledge or vision to have sound judgment for the whole....
I know that is a controversial assertion and risks provoking some objection, especially on a conspiracy theory site!

But here is what I mean- from a french news report and editorial:


Le gouvernement aurait pu débloquer un fonds d'urgence pour ces commerçants qui subissent une baisse de leur activité et de nombreux dégâts matériels, comme il le fait lors de grosses inondations, par exemple. Mais au lieu de cela, elle préfère utiliser l'aide au développement européenne pour sécuriser ses frontières.

www.lexpress.fr...

Translation-

The government could release an emergency fund for those small business owners who experience a decrease in their activity and extensive damage , as it does during major floods , for instance. But instead , it prefers to use the European development aid to secure its borders .

Now, this article refers to what people in the area are protesting and demanding- the local businesses complain that the presence of these people and camps causes them to lose customers and income (people don't want to go close to the camps). So they are demanding financial aid from the government. This is what is often asked for by the people- "my (whatever they produce) isn't selling well, so I want to receive money from the government to make up for it".

They protest when any other attempt is made to find a long term solution to the cause of the problem instead!
It's like demanding the short term relief of symptoms, and refusing effort towards healing the infection. It seems short sighted to me.

It's sort of confusing to see the people on this thread simultaneously saying "Good for those protestors! Their government should be doing more to reinforce their borders!!!"
When that is what those people are against.

These recent protests demand a quick closing of the camps, in which the migrants are simply forced out. The problem is that we've already seen that only results in pushing them to other surrounding cities. It doesn't solve the problem, it only displaces it. The people of Calais, and the truckers, are (understandably) concerned with their own immediate well being and comfort.

Yet, I can't help but ask myself- is that the job of the government? To give the people whatever they demand, no matter what the long term or more global effect?
Or is it to look at the long term and more global issue and attend to that?

I don't know. I don't pretend to have answers. Only pointing out that although it is fun to make quick and harsh judgements, reality is often a bit more complex than that.

For example, since these migrants are coming in here through other european countries, and the french have no control over the policies of other countries concerning immigration,
Then perhaps they need to focus upon their border policy? Upon their relations with other european countries?

Not that simple- France has worked hard to create harmonious relations with countries like Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain.... there are a lot of potential ramifications to consider there....
But talking about the relations between France and these other countries on our borders seems, to the average citizen, utterly disconnected from the present problem of having a lot of migrants in their backyard! But it isn't.

edit on 8-9-2016 by Bluesma because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2016 @ 02:42 PM
link   
a reply to: Krakatoa

I feel like its never right for people to die but at the same time no one is listening to these people.



posted on Sep, 8 2016 @ 03:15 PM
link   
a reply to: Kurokage




90% of these people are not Syrians fleeing oppression they are just economic migrants trying to urn a quick buck.

provide facts please.



posted on Sep, 8 2016 @ 03:22 PM
link   
It will take the death of a driver before anyone on either side of the channel starts to take this seriously and then they'll just say lots of reassuring words until it drops out of the headlines again.

Politics.



posted on Sep, 8 2016 @ 03:28 PM
link   
Good on truckers. Our governments are against us and it's time to take matters into our own hands. Wish the US military had half the balls as these truckers.



posted on Sep, 12 2016 @ 03:39 PM
link   
a reply to: Bluesma

Star for your insightful post.



Yet, I can't help but ask myself- is that the job of the government? To give the people whatever they demand, no matter what the long term or more global effect? Or is it to look at the long term and more global issue and attend to that?


The answer is *yes* to all the above.

Government is *employed* by the people to govern. It's role is to cater to the needs of society it has been appointed to serve while weighing both short term and long term effects of their policies - both domestically and globally.



I don't know. I don't pretend to have answers. Only pointing out that although it is fun to make quick and harsh judgements, reality is often a bit more complex than that.


I agree.



For example, since these migrants are coming in here through other european countries, and the french have no control over the policies of other countries concerning immigration, Then perhaps they need to focus upon their border policy? Upon their relations with other european countries?


I strongly believe the EU and UK need to reevaluate their border policies that takes into account the present humanitarian issues. Doing so will at least protect the most vulnerable (children and young adults).


"It's a lack of political will that stops the U.K. and French governments from placing a temporary U.K. immigration outpost in Calais to process the most urgent asylum claims to Britain."


www.cbc.ca...



I end up seeing that there might be something to the argument that the lower classes or "typical middle class" civilian might not have enough education, knowledge or vision to have sound judgment for the whole....


The wealthier class might not have enough education, knowledge or vision to have sound judgment for the whole, as well. In fact, history has shown this to be true...



I know that is a controversial assertion and risks provoking some objection, especially on a conspiracy theory site!


It risk provoking objection in any environment and among those who refuse to judge people based on economic class.

Economic class has no bearing on whether one is capable or not to govern - commonsense is more important than dollars and cents. Wealth is of the heart and mind - not the pocket. Those who possess that are the ones who should be truly calling the shots.
edit on 12-9-2016 by Involutionist because: Grammar and punctuation SUCKS!



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 01:33 AM
link   

originally posted by: Involutionist
a reply to: Bluesma

Government is *employed* by the people to govern. It's role is to cater to the needs of society it has been appointed to serve while weighing both short term and long term effects of their policies - both domestically and globally.


Now see that is what I think too. But in France, the government is most often swayed and bullied by the working class and their protests. This results in a lot of stupid flipflopping, as they are forced to do one thing, then the opposite, as the people see it was a stupid mistake and change their minds.




The wealthier class might not have enough education, knowledge or vision to have sound judgment for the whole, as well. In fact, history has shown this to be true...


Oh, you have misunderstood.
The reason I mentioned the lower and working classes is because they are the ones who are active in moving the government!

You will not see the higher classes doing protests which stop up the country and force the hand of the government.
It is mostly all transport that protests (public transport, trucks, trains, planes...) that is stopped during protests.
When this happens, (usually several times a year) within three days the grocery stores have empty shelves; in four,the gas stations are emptied and closed; after six days businesses close for lack of materials and goods and employees that cannot get to work anyway.

I have not yet heard of any CEO going on strike. The other social classes of leadership do not have this power.
The 'intellectuals" (as they are sometimes referred to as) will be most likely to have animated discussions, and get involved in politics, but they are not the "muscle" of the country.
I have read the opinion in many editorials that in France, it is the least educated who run the country.
In many latin based countries (Italy, France, Spain), you see the illegitmate powers are ultimately stronger than the legit.

(I spent too much time trying to describe the situation and my point became unclear...I suspect it might be better if there was a sort of cooperation between the different parts of the society instead? Not that the higher educated "bourgeoisie" should have full power. I think it should be shared more evenly, so that the long term and wider concerns get as much treatment as the local immediate ones. In other words, once in a while, I think the leaders and government should say "no".)




It risk provoking objection in any environment and among those who refuse to judge people based on economic class.


Certainly. Yet I prefer to address the reality rather than treat it as taboo, pretending it doesn't exist, as much as I have no specific desire to make people upset.

Ones class, their relation to the mode of production DOES have an impact upon things like their education and knowledge of politics other than local.
It's just a fact.

(what i suspect might be misunderstood by some readers is that outside the US, class, status and power is not measured by income)



Economic class has no bearing on whether one is capable or not to govern - commonsense is more important than dollars and cents. Wealth is of the heart and mind - not the pocket. Those who possess that are the ones who should be truly calling the shots.


Very pretty and poetic!
The reality is that "common sense" doesn't mean the same thing to everyone.
Social class as referring to financial wealth is not what I was referring to. I was referring to the roles they play in the society.
In France, a farmer often makes more money than a bank manager.
I was referring to the type of work they do, their relation to means of production, and the amount of education and world experience they tend to have.

I live amongst farmers and manual workers- NONE of my neighbors have been to Paris. None of them have been out of this country ever. Most have never left the county their life. They married someone they grew up with, and live on the family property going back for generations.
This makes their experience of the larger world rather limited.
The majority of them stopped school at around fifteen or sixteen. Either to go to a technical school, agricultural school, or simply begin working. (this is not seen as a failure or lesser choice in this country, at all).
This makes their knowledge of politics, history, geography, world economics, etc. much more limited than the people who go on to longer education in order to find positions less manual in nature.
That's a reality.
Just as much as the fact that those who go on in school and go directly into management, for example, will be much more limited in their manual skills. In this country, you don't "work your way up" as in the US. A manager has never done the job his inferiors are doing. (this is part of what allows them to remain on equal footing in power, ultimately).

(ETA- came back to see I once again got carried away trying to describe the situation- if you skip that, I offer the summation- here it IS the lower and working classes who have all the power! It is ALREADY the case! This is a socialist culture. This is not the US, where individualism, capitalism and consumerism are king. Events here need to be regarded within their context and environment).

Anyway.... I understand that people in the countries who do not have this power can see this as a formidable uprising and applaud it.
But this is everyday life here. Protests of this sort are going on most of the time. One year it was determined our kids lost one third of the planned curriculum in the year because of strikes and protests! They had to change all the curriculum for the next year in function.

The people protesting this time will most likely get what they want- more subsidies, and dispersal of the camps.
Then the people in the surrounding cities will have the same problem, they will do this, and get more subsidies , and more dispersal.... and so on.

My problem with this plan?
I'm one of those paying for these subsidies instead of receiving them. I know it is not an unlimited magic box of money.
I would like to see my taxes going towards some long term solutions instead.

edit on 13-9-2016 by Bluesma because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 01:03 PM
link   
a reply to: Bluesma

I understand where you are coming from even more now than before, and much what you stated resonates with my philosophy. Thank you for taking the time to expound on your previous comment to clarify. Also, thank you for sharing your thoughts about this particular matter and providing me an inside glimpse concerning the dynamics behind the politics of France, its citizens and certain ongoing societal issues. I admire your ability to weigh matters out from many angles with fairness in mind. I read your comment twice.

I've Been to France many times, and like all nations is this world, it has its issues (sadly, more than others re; terrorist attacks) despite being a beautiful land with beautiful people and culture (and wine!).



...the lower and working classes who have all the power! It is ALREADY the case! This is a socialist culture. This is not the US, where individualism, capitalism and consumerism are king. Events here need to be regarded within their context and environment.


Here in Canada, the dynamics are almost the same - we live in a socialist culture as well. For the most part, it seems to be working, but again, like all nations, there are issues that still exist that causes much debate when certain policies and resolutions are proposed.



The people protesting this time will most likely get what they want- more subsidies, and dispersal of the camps. Then the people in the surrounding cities will have the same problem, they will do this, and get more subsidies , and more dispersal.... and so on.


I feel you.

The article I provided in my previous comment touches on this issue. The UK and France need to come up with a plan to help the most vulnerable by addressing the humanitarian issue - sort out who are truly *refugees* and who are *migrants*. As far as what to do after that concerning the migrants - I don't know. This is where things get complicated as you already highlighted.



This makes their knowledge of politics, history, geography, world economics, etc. much more limited than the people who go on to longer education in order to find positions less manual in nature. That's a reality.


I see where you are coming from. I pray that one day we live in a world where governments are comprised of souls such as the ones who participate in TEDTalks. IMO, those are the people who should be leading the world. Right now, my friend, we have this to contend with:




posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 01:09 PM
link   
a reply to: dogstar23

"I'd start by asking what their proposals for earning their way into French society are?"

They have no wish to enter "French society". They are in Calais so they can attempt to enter the U.K. via the ferry port or tunnel.
edit on 13-9-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 01:19 PM
link   
a reply to: andy06shake




They have no wish to enter "French society". They are in Calais so they can attempt to enter the U.K. via the ferry port or tunnel.

other refugee camps are full so they end up in calais, cameron and now mays refusal to let any enter to appease ukip is causing a logjam in france.



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 04:08 PM
link   
SPAM removed by admin
edit on Sep 16th 2016 by Djarums because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2016 @ 04:27 PM
link   
a reply to: stinkelbaum

Well if we bomb them they will come or so it seems.


Fact is through the U.K is on its arse right now, or at least that's what "They" would have us believe.

Ether way Britain needs more refugees right now like it does a hole in the head. Need to sort out our own socioeconomic nightmare before attempting to accommodate others. Stands to reason after all charity begins at home.
edit on 13-9-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2016 @ 10:32 PM
link   
what makes these clowns think they are welcome in our 1st world paradises that OUR ancestors built? name 1 reason why anyone owes these oxygen wasters anything?

maybe if their ancestors had half a brain and planned for the future instead of delusions of heaven and invisible friends they might have a half decent culture, but no they just continue on the same islamic nonsense because they are willing to kill eachother if they dont all believe the same nonsense.

islam is terrible, ergo muslims are terrible.



new topics

top topics



 
23
<< 1   >>

log in

join