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Riding horses? Total beginner need tips.

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posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 10:32 AM
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I need to be able to ride a horse so I can use it in extra work but the closest I have been to a type of horse is a Donkey called Kong at Blackpool when I was a kid.
I have looked at my local riding places like here

www.laurabrennanec.co.uk...

But I have a few questions.

How long will it take to be able to say "Yes I can ride a Horse?" because If it is going to cost me 30 quid an hour I would like to work out the cost.
Do they smell fear?
Is it like riding a bike? once you learn you never forget?.
It doesn't say but will they expect me to muck em out after the lesson?
Like I said I know nowt about them and thought I would ask you lot.
Oh last question do you think they will sense I have eaten their kind?
.




posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 10:34 AM
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posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Make sure you enjoy the horse. The movement, the smell, all of it.

The most important thing riding teachers taught me: "smile, riding is fun."



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

It'll takes a few times, everyone's different.
Yes, they smell fear, and some will be mean because of it. Just like people. Get a horse specifically for a newbie. Try to really get to know one first, maybe it'll be nicer to you.

Don't think of how it tastes. They are psychic. They'll know and hate you for it.

I'm not a good rider. They're so big, and they always sense some fear....
Beautiful animals.....



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 10:46 AM
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posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Plenty of affordable riding places in the Cotswolds.

www.cotswoldsriding.co.uk...



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:02 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

A bit far that dude.
Anyone got any idea how long it can take?



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

We ride Whippets up North fed on Gravy Oooooo northern boys love gravy.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

I used to clean stables in exchange for riding lessons back in the day.

Might want to look into that.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

All joking aside you can learn the basics in one day with a well trained horse.

My parents used to keep horses and a beginner would be able to handle them without issue. Learning some more advanced handling will take additional time but if they just want you to go from a trot to a gallop for a scene (for example) it would not be difficult.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Oooo thats good news I thought it was going to take months
.
Oh and mucking out stables? nope but I could get one of my minions to do so for me..



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

When I first started in the biz as background/extra; being able to ride was mandatory. It took about an hour to become comfortable with great instruction from an on set wrangler. But retain a healthy respect as even a gentle mount can spook and create a very dangerous situation. I was just in one with this show, with some extras that claimed they could ride....but coulden't. Don't BS just to get the gig. The horse bump isn't worth getting injured or injuring someone else.


edit on 4-9-2016 by olaru12 because: w-6kln



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:18 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Horsemanship is a skill best learned as a young man but honestly, anyone can learn to ride. I have trained show horses since i was eleven. Saddlebreds, TN walkers, quarter horses, spotted saddle, hackney ponies, thoroughbreds, warmbloods, you name it, i have ridden it. I even have two world champion saddlebreds under my belt. No kidding.

Can horses smell fear? Yes, they can. They can def tell if you are nervouse. Horses can spook in a second. It is what they are built to do. So you must always remember to stay calm and be aware of your animals emotions.

Very important, find out your local laws about liability around horses. In TN, each individual is responsible for themselves when at a barn or around any horses. If i take on a child as a student and that child gets hurt by a horse, i cannot be held liable. There are signs posted at every training barn to let the public know. It is considered a very dangerous and unpredictable sport. Most people get hurt by a horse at some point.

Now that the warnings are over, my best advice would be to find an established barn with good calm horses and an experienced calm trainer. You can prob find one in your local ads. $30 an hour is pretty fair. Listen to what they say, and above all else spend time, a lot of time just watching the horses and watching them train other riders. You will pick up just as much knowledge watching them as you will riding, but there is no substitution for riding. It's the only way to learn.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:18 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

I'm far from an expert but I rode a lot when I was younger. As far as smelling fear, imo, they sense uneasiness/emotions. They tap into the mood of the herd and certainly, to some extent, they do the same with us. Horses can be shy/skittish, establishing yourself as pack leader/stallion can make all the difference.

I never received proper training, I just jumped on the back of a pinto pony and rode like the wind. Hang on and when riding in the woods be prepared to duck/jump and sometimes roll. Always respect their size and ability to bite, kick and kill you.

A friend of mine died from a fall on her horse and she was a longtime horsewoman/outfitter. Accidents happen, never get complacent or take unnecessary risks beyond your abilities and did I mention hang on. I used my legs a lot. I'm small, considered becoming a jockey but it's a career plagued with injuries so take heed.

Horses are large animals, they have moods just like us and sometimes just being in close proximity puts you in harms way. Think heavy equipment with a mind of its own. Good luck



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

My best advice is to make friends with the horse for a while before mounting up so that you are both more comfortable with each other. Use a gentle but firm hand and always remember that the horse is an extremely smart creature who deserves your respect. Use a firm but gentle voice- don't get frustrated and raise your voice or yank on the reigns with an attitude. Also remember to be careful about squeezing the horse with your legs or knees as most horses respond to these actions as steering instructions just like if you pulled the reigns to either side. You will be fine!



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Im not an expert by any means...but the most important thing Ive learned is that a horse can "sense" whether youve ridden before. They can kinda tell if you have experience riding them.

Prob not explaining it well..but they know..and its important as you learn to get them to listen and "follow" your guidance in directions....*

*Many years ago...one of my 1st rides? The horse kept running back to the stable...get out and away from it...and she would turn and bolt back to the corral! Another time...this horse would just stop and eat...just STOP...and start nibbling again!



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 12:44 PM
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Question: Is it true that horses don't like bleeders? Something I heard long ago that somehow I can't find the answer searching on Google. When I cut myself (accidentally) I bleed profusely, or is it just the horses smell so to speak my uneasiness when I'm around them?



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

Bleeders? As in hemopheliac? I've never heard that before. It is known that they do have an incredible olfactory ability.



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