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This CIA-Backed D-Wave Quantum Computer Will Change Your View of Reality Forever

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posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:11 PM
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The title may turn some people off before they have a chance to view the video or read the very short article ? I hope not.

Two very large Quantum computing devices exist today and the video in particular discusses how they work and the reality of parallel universes where data can be retrieved. The speaker/inventor/manufacturer/ in the video does not speak above the heads of anyone who is not a particle Physics major but instead explains stuff where those with even the most basic grasp of the English language and a tad bit of science can understand.

I for one had not realized we had progressed this far in the Quantum computing field and found the video on how they work very interesting. youtu.be...
The video starts slow in science and explanation but is worth a watch for the meat of the subject.

www.activistpost.com...

Meanwhile as everyone was busy arguing over the bread and circus elections, the CIA was busy funding a computer so powerful that it is described as “tapping into the fundamental fabric of reality” and the man who owns the company says being near one is like “standing at the altar of an alien God.”


The reason he says this is because of the way the pulse (using sound waves) refrigeration fires just about every second and can be heard...like a human heart beat.

Now from DARPA: www.activistpost.com...


Interestingly, the timeline given by DARPA’s “Forward to the Future” video messages, seen below, is 2045 – the theorized date of The Singularity popularized by futurist Ray Kurzweil in his 2006 book The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology. As the title implies, The Singularity is the threshold where computer systems surpass and/or augment both the intelligence and the biological functions of the human body. It’s a process that already has begun, and DARPA is reinforcing their commitment to make it a reality by the target date.

With yearly (known) funding in the tens of billions of dollars, DARPA also receives untold funding for “black budget” secret projects not even subjected to presidential and congressional oversight. So when they cast a vision of the future, it is worth paying attention.

youtu.be...


The future of Neural technology: youtu.be...


Material science and the expected progress within the next 30 years using Nanotech. Are the predictions correct or are they like all the articles about atomic cars or personal flying cars that were popular back in the 50s ? Some of this stuff I have noted in this thread will no doubt come to pass.... the time frame barring us destroying ourselves is the question IMO. youtu.be...




posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Watched this a couple of weeks ago and have been thinking about it since. His prediction about robots outpacing humans in everything freaked me out. But I don't think they can outpace humans in stupidity and doing the wrong thing at the wrong time, that will probably save us.
Thanks for posting



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Quantum computing was simply a matter of time, not a what if. It's the process of making an electrical "brain" that was inevitable from day one. Once we began evolving data storage and transfer at such an exponential rate the limits became boundless. I'm pretty sure we've had quantum computing since the dawn of the computer era, the tech really hasn't changed it only has become better refined.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:31 PM
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Shouldn't a Quantum computer be able to access data from the future?



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: Xeven

It would require data from the future to do so. Humans can't program that.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:51 PM
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Is this stuff bypassing Star Trek technology? If so, I don't believe any of it. Just rubbish.


+9 more 
posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:54 PM
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The D-Wave computer isn't even a quantum computer. It is based purely on the classical model. However, it does leverage quantum tunneling, which is why D-Wave cites "quantum effects" in its operation.

There are electrical components that leverage quantum tunneling, and we certainly do not refer to these as quantum devices.

There are real quantum computers in the world. They are not nearly as functional as the D-Wave because researchers are still figuring out how to make them work.

In fact, there is still significant doubt about whether the quantum effects of the D-Wave even lead to any tangible improvement in computing power. Yes, the D-Wave is very fast at the type of computation for which it was specifically designed, but those benefits do not carry over to standard benchmark tests the way you'd imagine they would.

As it turns out, the D-Wave is the world's best processor for a very specific kind of mathematical calculation, whether it's a quantum computer or not.

As far as the inventor of the D-Wave, he's fond of making outlandish claims, such as his hyperbolic assertion that quantum tunneling has been proven to involve extra-spatial dimensions. Don't even get me started....

I've done a fair amount of research on this thing. Here's a link to the best introductory article I've found on the subject: arstechnica.com...
edit on 2-9-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:55 PM
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The military must be having a continuous orgasm. After all that's probably where the money is coming from to carry on this research.

Back in Black....


edit on 2-9-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: 727Sky

Watched this a couple of weeks ago and have been thinking about it since. His prediction about robots outpacing humans in everything freaked me out. But I don't think they can outpace humans in stupidity and doing the wrong thing at the wrong time, that will probably save us


Don't be so sure. You have to remember that the thing is conceived and designed and built by humans. You have to ask yourself what we're (they're) trying to do. Basically they want to make a superhuman. Whatever else it may be capable of, it's going to be based on humans and if it isn't capable of making mistakes, it cannot be a truly thinking consciousness.

If every other human like quality is present (and amplified) you could only expect the worst of human traits to be similarly amplified.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:01 PM
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Thank you for taking the time to make a good post like this about that.


My 2007 film made entirely with their media (well not the music) and their words is the likely still the best way to envision what DARPA is trying to do.




If the ‘robo-snipers’ and ‘automated kill zones’ didn’t freak you out then perhaps this will. Check out this video – DARPA’s iXo Artificial Intelligence Control Grid: 20 cyber-bugged minutes virtually adrift inside the surreal cytoplasmic warfare-obsessed cerebral distortions of DARPA’s techno-militaristic planning regime. If the war machine could dream this would surely be it. Seriously, this is some freaky-ass #. -Subtopia

edit on 2-9-2016 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

Thank you for posting your information. I do not have any sort of computer back ground other than as an end user... I have mastered how to turn one on but myself and probably many other have no idea how far the Quantum tech stuff has advanced.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:16 PM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
a reply to: Greggers

Thank you for posting your information. I do not have any sort of computer back ground other than as an end user... I have mastered how to turn one on but myself and probably many other have no idea how far the Quantum tech stuff has advanced.



I hope I didn't come across as dismissive. I find quantum computing (and quantum physics in general) quite fascinating and am always happy to see people learning about it.

That first video you posted, however, is getting a lot of play on these forums because of the speaker's claims about alternate dimensions, which are simply not validated by empirical evidence at this time. Given that his computer doesn't even directly manipulate quantum bits, it's pretty clear he's applied his own science-fiction understanding to the black box of quantum physics.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:44 PM
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originally posted by: Xeven
Shouldn't a Quantum computer be able to access data from the future?


It's not a time machine....
2



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:45 PM
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originally posted by: Justso
Is this stuff bypassing Star Trek technology? If so, I don't believe any of it. Just rubbish.


I don't think these corporate computer heads are investing in rubbish there.....
2



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:55 PM
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As fascinating as the subject may be, and it is fascinating, I ponder to myself on the consequences of creating machines with high AI? If there is one aspect to today's world that stands out, it is that both ethics and morality are given little consideration.

As much as I enjoy science and the technology it builds, I do feel we are making such vast and fast strides forward in a technology sense that it is leaving behind all sense of prudence. The fact that we can create these technologies creates the unease and the worry that creating them is taking precedence over the question of if we should, or if it is right to do so?

I believe we need to maintain a balance of regulation through prudence, and ensure that we are mature enough to remain both ethical and moral as we take our giant steps forward. Certain technologies remove our 'humanity' and have a danger to make us dependent (in an addictive sense) on them being around. Science and technology should enhance us all, equally at the same time.



posted on Sep, 3 2016 @ 12:09 AM
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originally posted by: elysiumfire
As fascinating as the subject may be, and it is fascinating, I ponder to myself on the consequences of creating machines with high AI? If there is one aspect to today's world that stands out, it is that both ethics and morality are given little consideration.

As much as I enjoy science and the technology it builds, I do feel we are making such vast and fast strides forward in a technology sense that it is leaving behind all sense of prudence. The fact that we can create these technologies creates the unease and the worry that creating them is taking precedence over the question of if we should, or if it is right to do so?

I believe we need to maintain a balance of regulation through prudence, and ensure that we are mature enough to remain both ethical and moral as we take our giant steps forward. Certain technologies remove our 'humanity' and have a danger to make us dependent (in an addictive sense) on them being around. Science and technology should enhance us all, equally at the same time.


No one could really disagree with a desire to use the future tech in a responsible way....,
BUT...hahaha always a but..

Guns, aircraft, ships and boats, even our basic communication and navigation systems have been funded by or advanced by the fear of war and coming in at #2. I have no doubt the military would love to get their hands on a humanoid super duper robot that could be told, "Go take that hill" and the Bot would do it without further direction..

All tech is like a two edged sword for both good and the capability of seriously wrong endeavors IMO.



posted on Sep, 3 2016 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: Greggers


That first video you posted, however, is getting a lot of play on these forums because of the speaker's claims about alternate dimensions, which are simply not validated by empirical evidence at this time.

Yeah I remember first seeing that video probably more than a year ago. Although the OP's video looks like it could be the same lecture just given at a different place. As for what he says about parallel dimensions, it is certainly an unverified claim, but it's not hard to see why someone might reach that conclusion. Scientists tend to believe that computing power will increase exponentially with the addition of more qubits, so something like 300 qubits would be enough to simulate every particle in the observable universe. Think about what that implies though, it means the computer is simulating a universe containing far more particles than the actual computer contains.

There's clearly something very strange happening there and it could be said that quantum computers must be exploiting parallel dimensions. That's actually one of the main reasons I think we'll never have true quantum computers capable of computing things such as Shor's algorithm or Grover's algorithm. The physics behind the idea of a quantum computer violates some sort of conservation principle imo. The core difference between a quantum object and a classical object is the number of particles making up the object. Isolated particles will do weird things but large objects made of many particles will experience decoherence and behave in a classical manner.

I believe that combining many qubits together inherently demands the construction of a classical system, because once you link together too many different things decoherence will be unavoidable. It's why we can create primitive quantum computers with a small number of qubits but we haven't been able to scale up those systems after decades of research. I mean the D-wave system is still pretty interesting but it can only solve a very specific set of problems, it cannot break classical cryptography or anything like that. I really would like true quantum computers to be possible, but the rational side of me says they some how violate the laws of physics.
edit on 3/9/2016 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2016 @ 01:25 AM
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originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: Greggers

That first video you posted, however, is getting a lot of play on these forums because of the speaker's claims about As for what he says about parallel dimensions, it is certainly an unverified claim, but it's not hard to see why someone might reach that conclusion.

Sure. It's easy to see how a person who doesn't know any better might make the claim that quantum tunneling proves that extra-spatial dimensions exist. However, someone like the inventor of the D-Wave has an air of authority, and so people actually take him seriously. Which is really too bad, because his claims are totally unsubstantiated.



Scientists tend to believe that computing power will increase exponentially with the addition of more qubits, so something like 300 qubits would be enough to simulate every particle in the observable universe. Think about what that implies though, it means the computer is simulating a universe containing far more particles than the actual computer contains.
I'd like to see some documentation on what sort of simulation of the entire universe would be possible with 300 qubits. I suspect it wouldn't be a very good simulation. Based on my research, it would take about 80 qubits just to simulate all the cells in the human body in real time. And here we are talking CELLS, not subatomic particles. It simply would not be possible for any computer to simulate the entire universe IN REAL TIME at a subatomic level, whether it was a quantum computer or not. I suspect you'd need to devote power to simulating only that which was being actively observed, which may in fact be what our universe does (see the double slit experiment -- in particular the delayed choice quantum eraser). Although you'd never hear me claim it was a fact, because at present it is not.



There's clearly something very strange happening there and it could be said that quantum computers must be exploiting parallel dimensions.

Quantum mechanics is strange, but the statement that it "must be exploiting parallel dimensions" it totally baseless. It is the "must" part I take exception to, as there are a lot of other explanations for quantum strangeness, none of them proven.


edit on 3-9-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2016 @ 01:32 AM
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Who knew a simulated annealer that's not even a proper quantum computer is like 'the altar of an alien God'?

One day they'll have a real one. This isn't it.



posted on Sep, 3 2016 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: Greggers


Sure. It's easy to see how a person who doesn't know any better might make the claim that quantum tunneling proves that extra-spatial dimensions exist. However, someone like the inventor of the D-Wave has an air of authority, and so people actually take him seriously. Which is really too bad, because his claims are totally unsubstantiated.

Well he is clearly a business man before a scientist, he's trying to hype up his own product and get people interested in it. However many prominent scientists believe in the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics so it's not actually all that crazy to be talking about parallel dimensions when it comes to quantum mechanics. I personally do not believe in that interpretation of QM.


Quantum mechanics is strange, but the statement that it "must be exploiting parallel dimensions" it totally baseless. It is the "must" part I take exception to, as there are a lot of other explanations for quantum strangeness, none of them proven.

I'm just looking at it from an informational perspective, we have to be able to explain how a small number of particles can simulate a much larger number of particles. As I said, I don't think true quantum computers can actually exist, so we'll never exploit any parallel dimensions, but if they did work as claimed there aren't many sensible sounding explanations.



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