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Shared Psychosis

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posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 07:16 AM
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Also known as folie à deux, Lasègue-Falret Syndrome, shared psychotic disorder or induced delusional disorder, the nature of this phenomenon is as fascinating as it is mysterious. To give a basic definition: it involves delusions or hallucinations that are transmitted between or shared by two or more people. Perhaps the most popular example of this phenomenon, and one which has been widely discussed on ATS itself, is the case of the twin sisters Ursula and Sabina Eriksson.

What I find interesting about shared psychotic disorder is the way it can "spread" from one person to another. Does spending enough time around those who harbour strong delusions place another person at risk of developing the same delusions? I suppose, essentially, this phenomenon might lead back to the old-age debate of genetics vs. environment. Are two people who share the eerily similar delusion predetermined to do so by their genes, or does spending time in similar environments lead to such circumstances?

I admit that I have only done a limited amount of research on this topic, but I was wondering if some of the great minds on ATS could contribute and perhaps add their insight, or share any interesting information about the topic they might be privy to.




posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

Hallucinations can't be shared. That might lend to what they used to call mass hypnosis, where a bunch of people all think the same thing? They don't really see the same thing they go along with the loudest mouths who claim they do. Nationalistic pride or Religious fervor being two prime examples. Lots of people are disturbed.

Who wants to be the stupid that says hey, the king has no clothes. or the idiot in the lynch mob that says wait a second, are we doing the right thing? Or the whistle blower, what a party pooper.

And we were having such fun with our Grand Delusions.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

I know from spending time around people in psychosis one begins to question one's self (and indeed oneself) - almost experiencing symptoms.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 07:41 AM
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originally posted by: and14263
a reply to: Dark Ghost

I know from spending time around people in psychosis one begins to question one's self (and indeed oneself) - almost experiencing symptoms.

Dysfunctional people drag everyone down with them.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

I would go with environment. But interesting.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Slightly more of a negative approach than I would have used but by definition correct.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 08:10 AM
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Women will sync their periods, men will follow their army leaders. The more people find they have in common the more their brain waves will enter into a synchronized state. This is possible, you just have to allow it in. The more you imagine yourself to be like the person you're experiencing, the more you will in fact become like them. If you're aware of this you can use it to your benefit, mirroring and disconnecting at will.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

You mean like in a "work environment"?



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

Yes that is very true. I never believed it was possible but my wife assures me that after working with the same group of ladies for a long enough time they all had their periods at the same time. Best during that week of the month to stay far away from that office.

edit on 9/2/2016 by wtbengineer because: correct and add



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 09:04 AM
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Schizos are never alone.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Not true, i have schizophrenia and many other fancier ones, with more exotic names,

Buut anyhow, i have had shared hallucinations with other phrenics, just like the Jewish people!

But on topic, you know Regular Joe from down the street?
That is shared psychosis.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: solve


Buut anyhow, i have had shared hallucinations with other phrenic, just like the Jewish people!

How long did it take to convince them?



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

Reality is a shared hallucination.

-True story-



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Convince them of what?

Usually it goes like this, someone sees something that makes you feel weird or uneasy, the starts to suggest leaving or doing something else, once location has changed, the other ones says something like this,

Man, i am happy because we left, or started to play football instead of walking, near that weird house,
blaa blaa blaa,

What? you saw it too, and it had the same (enter details)

I have this theory, though... its all about subjective reality. and about the gnomes, always about the gnomes.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: solve

Well then thats not psychosis, thats a shared experience. Over a lifetime I've has few of those, including a UFO encounter.

We all saw it. there was no doubt.

Everyone at the same time asking over and again, "What is that?"



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Psychiatrists really hate shared states of mind, whatever they may be.

-Have to edit a bit, shared hallucinations with other people, who are in a state of psychosis, are rare.
edit on 2-9-2016 by solve because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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originally posted by: solve
a reply to: intrptr

Psychiatrists really hate shared states of mind, whatever they may be.

Thats because they don't believe in anything, except medication.

Lots of people like that. I stayed at my brothers haunted house for five nights once, it was a roller coaster ride of activity. Knockings and rappings, alarm going off, lights flickering, dog growling at nothing, to name a few.

He lived in denial about it for years, finally selling the place at a loss after sinking a ton of money in improvements.

To this day he cant quite say why he vacated. That place was haunted, I knew it the first night. He will never admit it, though. He goes to church. All spirit activity is 'the devil'.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: Argentbenign
Schizos are never alone.


I think most people suffer socially acceptable forms of schizophrenia. Just look at how many people feel it is completely normal to talk to themselves, who have conversational dialogue in their own heads. They may not outwardly express it, like diagnosed schizo's do, but there's a split in them regardless.
edit on 2-9-2016 by Visitor2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: Visitor2012

That's not schizophrenia.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: Visitor2012

That's not schizophrenia.
.

Yes, perhaps not the medical definition of it, but nonetheless there are still two personas operating when a person is in dialogue with himself. Talking to yourself, distinguished from thinking, is a subtle delusional state of mind. In my opinion of course. Cheers.



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