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Strange Bubbles In North Platte River (Wyoming)

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posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:40 AM
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Oh I guess by now, you know that I am a Yellowstone Tard. Anyways, on or near August 18, 2016 a person recorded this video. Now if it was a pipe release wouldn't there be a nearby sewage facility? This is in the middle of the N Platte River trails and it's all woodsy there. The person who wrote the article wants to know if anyone has any info on this. This started bubbling suddenly with a pop, then stopped.

Something just makes me feel that the entire old and original YS caldera is acting up and not just the park.






I was walking along the North Platte River trails with my dog, when I heard a loud pop followed by a rushing water or splashing sound coming from the river.

I’ve spent a lot of time on rivers and streams all across this beautiful state and I’ve never been witness to anything like this in Wyoming.


Strange Bubbles In The N Platte River




posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: elouina Underwater gases.
Just a guess.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:47 AM
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a reply to: Argentbenign

Fish farts?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:48 AM
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a reply to: elouina

At the bottom of a river, the material can be dry in as little as 2-5 feet below the bottom. Water follows the path of least resistance, so I would say that water sunk to a dry spot in the river, and bubbles were released when it happened. I have witnessed this before, and it isn't out of the ordinary. The sky sounds are surely something that is out of the ordinary, however!



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:49 AM
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a reply to: elouina

OK gotcha, west of Laramie Wyoming. Crosses the border of Colorado and Wyoming.
Methane?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:50 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Argentbenign

Fish farts?


LOL... That would be some big farts. Hey there! Missed ya!



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:51 AM
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originally posted by: Bigburgh
a reply to: elouina

OK gotcha, west of Laramie Wyoming. Crosses the border of Colorado and Wyoming.
Methane?


I think the trails are in Casper?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:58 AM
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originally posted by: InFriNiTee
a reply to: elouina

At the bottom of a river, the material can be dry in as little as 2-5 feet below the bottom. Water follows the path of least resistance, so I would say that water sunk to a dry spot in the river, and bubbles were released when it happened. I have witnessed this before, and it isn't out of the ordinary. The sky sounds are surely something that is out of the ordinary, however!


Well since I have no clue what they are, I am just reporting them. I just did notice a comment on the video that this has happened before there. Would this phenomena happen repeatedly in the same spot?
edit on 30-8-2016 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 04:07 AM
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a reply to: elouina

It could happen in the same spot. The river may have moved a larger rock (>20 lbs.), and smashed it into a section that had dry material underneath. I've also seen that before. It's possible it could be gas rising (methane, etc.). Try this. Take a 5 gallon bucket, and fill it with some play sand. The sand must be dry to do this experiment. To dry the sand, lay it evenly in a horse trough for 2 days (as long as it doesn't rain). The finer the sand, the longer it will take to dry. Once it is bone dry, take another 5 gallon bucket filled with clean water, and dump it over the dry stuff. You will see this same bubbling reaction (on a smaller scale).

NOT RECOMMENDED: If someone wanted to try it, they could throw something that would ignite the bubbles (if they are methane). WARNING: IT COULD EXPLODE if it is methane, so the best way would be to get over the bubbles and smell them (without igniting them with anything). If it smells like a fart, then it is methane. It could be sulfuric acid coming in contact with something else it is reacting with (quartz, limestone, sandstone, etc.). If the vapors smell like sulfur and are acidic, it is likely that.
edit on 8/30/2016 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 04:16 AM
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Are they ' The Ranch' bubbles ???



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 04:17 AM
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Could it be a new spring popping up?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 05:40 AM
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Two divers releasing their air through what´s called "Munddusche" in German? It´s to clean your second stage.


edit on 30-8-2016 by verschickter because: question mark



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 06:49 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Argentbenign

Fish farts?


CAARP?

No, they don't have enough power to generate such flatulence



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 06:58 AM
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Do they Frack near there?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 07:31 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

Do they Frack near there?


First thing I thought of too.

Maybe the onset of a new sink hole because of it, if it is the case... ?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: elouina

Hydrogen Sulfide release... lucky for the video recorders it was windy (by the wind sounds in recording) and they weren't standing downwind of the release.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:35 AM
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originally posted by: savemebarry

originally posted by: intrptr

Do they Frack near there?


First thing I thought of too.

Maybe the onset of a new sink hole because of it, if it is the case... ?

Sink holes are associated more with underground caves or mining. Hot springs maybe too. I dunno, they aren't responding about fracking. I've seen reports of methane in wells, streams and whatnot associated with nearby Fracking activity. Fracturing underground channels in rock releases lots of 'natural gas' , let alone all the toxins used in the process, which they pump back down the wells to despose of it.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:39 AM
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originally posted by: InFriNiTee
a reply to: elouina

If it smells like a fart, then it is methane.


Methane has no smell. If it smells like rotten egg, it is hydrogen sulfide. In this video, there was a lot of wind and most likely the gas was taken away quickly in the wind. The recorders probably didn't smell the gas cuz of that and weren't probably in the direction of the wind from the gas release.



posted on Sep, 2 2016 @ 02:41 AM
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Just looking at possible causes and I wonder if that could have been a seep? With a river you may never see the oil.

This is a Nov 2015 video of the Bonanza anticline in the SE Bighorn Basin. This is a video of a seep near a fault. A seep is a combination of oil and gas. Pretty kewl The Bighorn Basin has vast oil reservoirs.





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