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30-Year-Old Man Volunteers For The First Human Head Transplant In The World

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posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 05:17 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

Having spoken to a few paraplegics, they have told me that the small things, like itchy noses, cheeks and things like that are quickly overcome by the simple fact of not being able to do anything about them. Not so much that the sensation disappears, but rather that they become inured to such sensations. It is quite weird in a way, because those who have lost only one sense quite often report an increase in sensitivity with the other senses.

Is that the case in your experience? I mean in talking to people who are physically incapable of normal action?

I am not taking away from the intrinsic argument you put forth regarding motive, just asking a question as you are here, and seem to be very conversant with medical issues.





posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

Sounds extremely complicated especially when they have to reattach the spinal cord. I would think if they could reattach the spinal cord there will be hope for many of those who are currently paralyzed! This patient is very brave for risking his life to undergo such a risky procedure. He probably feels like he has nothing to lose even if he loses his life during the procedure. I wish him well.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

"Canavero has recruited a head surgeon to lead this historical process. "

Good thing he got a head surgeon, sounds like he's on the right track! Wouldn't want a foot surgeon doing the job would he?



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: Jonjonj

Ha, A fair point.

You know that at one time the seat of consciousness was thought to be in the heart, of course that was before modern medical science but given how complex the nervous system is it is not surprising really that we may have some memory elsewhere in our body's than our brain's.

Personally for me the thought of head transplant's is a disgusting notion, now If I saw it as merely an organ transplant and indeed a cloned organ transplant (which three dimensional printing technology advancing all the time and even able to print organ's from stem cell's in the near future using a kind of organic paste around a printed cartilage type material which may be removed or dissolved once it has served it's purpose) then I would not have quite the reservation's I have about it.

But if we do store memory's elsewhere then you have to ask yourself just how much of you is really in your brain and therefore how much of you would survive this transplant, would you still be the same person even if your mind was intact.

The Moral implication's though are my primary concern and I do not think this doctor is developing this for the good of humanity, only the very wealthy will ever be likely to recieve this kind of treatment and of course it is a true Pandora's box.

You know despite my jibe at men wanting to be installed in woman's body's (I am sure there are some that would but it may actually be a case of them going insane as a result afterward's) another point is given that female anatomy has a kind of coping mechanism built into it to prevent rejection of foreign tissue which is essential during pregnancy to prevent the fetus being rejected then it is likely that the first long living head transplant subject will likely be female and there will be some kind of trick or hormone therapy used to promote this function of the donor body's immune response, I know that it is usually in relation to the placenta and the womb which are dedicated organ's but this must be an area that immunological rejection researchers have already researched extremely thoroughly.

In spite of my musing's though I personally think it is avery worrying subject that there are also many medical specialist's around the world whom have condemned this Italian's research as unethical.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: TDawg61

How long is the shelf life of a brain?

I would imagine not forever.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

Well walt disney has his frozen but even if they could revive it (which given the cellular damage and likely genetic fragmentation is unlikely to say the least) his corporate executer's and those today running his empire would never allow it.
Storing small genetic sample's is possible, even sperm can be frozen for a long period of time but not indefinitely and large tissue sample's have a number of problem's, cold caused ice crystal formation within the cell which disrupt's and destroy's the cell structure and cell wall's in human tissue.

In short not long, it is estimated that a decapitated person if they remain conscious can probably live for up to 30 second's, many head's of people murdered by the french in there revolution still had there eye's moving and even blinking after they had fallen into the basket, a rather unpleasant thought isn't it.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:12 AM
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originally posted by: TDawg61
I don't believe this attempt will succeed but eventually it will.Then wouldn't this be a crude form of immortality?And within the 50 years the replacement may last,science will find a way to"Grow"bodies and and replace memories.Science fiction to science fact.
We may want to start discussing the implications and ethics regarding such world changing developments such as these.


Look at the 2045 avatar b initiative






edit on 14831America/ChicagoTue, 30 Aug 2016 00:14:24 -0500000000p3142 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: Jonjonj

My husband is a nurse, and he's taken care of a quad for the past three years...home health, his sole patient. His patient frequently wishes for death.

I've cared for a number of them in the past as well, and none of them have been able to ignore an itch or being overheated or too cold...quite the opposite. Quadriplegics have no sensation from the neck down. They are completely paralyzed. Paraplegics are not paralyzed above the waist, so they've still got some options...although it is by no means easier to live with.

Quads have a host of other issues, although I bring up the itch or discomfort because that is a frequent complaint from these patients. They usually have a tracheostomy, and are in constant danger of infection.

They've got pressure ulcers and skin infections from lack of circulation, kidney problems, respiratory issues, digestive issues, severe muscle wasting...and every one of those things can be fatal. They cannot breathe unassisted. They are unable to fight infection...one virulent infection can kill them in a matter of days.

It is appalling to think that the ability to reattach a spinal column and successfully fuse the cord might have existed all this time, and people are being left to suffer like these patients do. And if this outlandish tale is true, it would seem the medical technology does indeed exist. So why haven't they been taking care of all the people out there who need this technology?

I just do not understand how this could be viable, but if it is, a whole lot of deserving people are being done a grave injustice by medical science.

ETA: I should clarify when I say "no sensation", that I'm referring to the nerve response that stimulates movement. Many can still feel hot and cold, many have peripheral neuropathy, "phantom limb" pain, severe muscle spasms...they feel a lot, and are helpless to do anything about it.


edit on 313412America/ChicagoTue, 30 Aug 2016 00:34:32 -050031am31242America/Chicago by tigertatzen because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

I believe they have HAD the ability to cure a great many things ...but theres no cash in curing,and they couldn't care less at the CEO level.
Morals EAT money.
edit on 30-8-2016 by cavtrooper7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:36 AM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

I would tend to agree with you on that. Knowing what I do about the medical field as a whole, I should not be surprised...but I still am. Appalled, really, more then shocked. And pissed off too.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

I'm sure it would have something to do with malpractice lawsuits and a high death percentage. However we are talking about folks who would rather die than continue living the way they do. Having said that, I would suppose that some kind of surgical fix would be their only hope.

Just my opinion, I have 0 firsthand knowledge on the subject but I do have insight as to why these things aren't pursued with a positive patient outcome inherent.

I agree with the zero profit reasons.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:42 AM
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originally posted by: interupt42

originally posted by: TDawg61
I don't believe this attempt will succeed but eventually it will.Then wouldn't this be a crude form of immortality?And within the 50 years the replacement may last,science will find a way to"Grow"bodies and and replace memories.Science fiction to science fact.
We may want to start discussing the implications and ethics regarding such world changing developments such as these.


Look at the 2045 avatar b initiative






Thank you providing that chart.Man striving for immortality.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 01:45 AM
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Would he be disappointed if his new body had a smaller penis?
dun duh dunnn!



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:15 AM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: tigertatzen

I'm sure it would have something to do with malpractice lawsuits and a high death percentage. However we are talking about folks who would rather die than continue living the way they do. Having said that, I would suppose that some kind of surgical fix would be their only hope.

Just my opinion, I have 0 firsthand knowledge on the subject but I do have insight as to why these things aren't pursued with a positive patient outcome inherent.

I agree with the zero profit reasons.



When I ask why, it is largely rhetorical...I know it's all about profit. It's just appalling. It'll never stop being appalling.

From a malpractice standpoint, just as in the case here, a radical procedure such as this for a quadriplegic would be done on an elective basis. There would be no insurance coverage, the patient signs a waiver. It's a hail Mary play.

Now, if it were to become a common treatment option, that could definitely be a concern...but for an experimental treatment, the patient agrees to the risk. I think this is more about breaking new ground than solving existing issues. More funding will be given to something like this than to the continuing, frustrating enigma of spinal cord injuries.

It's horrific that the mentality should be this way, but it is. Medical science is not more compassionate than any other branch of science when it comes to human beings. They're just as ruthless about getting ahead, if not more so than any other researchers. It's a very cutthroat field...sadly, the people who need that research the most never benefit from it.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:26 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

To get "ahead"? Very punny!

I agree though I don't see how this would work, isn't the issue in the brain anyway?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: iTruthSeeker

They might be able to reattach the head to another body and get the blood supply to the brain semi functional, but i don't see them being able to reattach the spinal cord completely meaning the candidate will probably still be paralyzed below the neck and possibly even unable to breath without assistance. There are just to many nerves i imagine.
edit on 30-8-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:16 PM
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A short while ago I read that somebody who had donor arms had rejected the tissue and they had to remove them, so I guess rejection is their main problem. If the patient rejects the donor body then what ?



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: manuelram16

They you die or they find a replacment i imagine.



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