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Mandela Effect - Headings vs Text - A Possible ME Start Date?

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posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: WakeUpBeer

I didn't attack you.
[..]
On topic: Could you explain why the examples you have presented us in the OP cannot be innocent typos?

My mistake.. I thought you did 'cause you said:


originally posted by: WakeUpBeer
I'm genuinely curious to know what this OP doesn't consider a Mandela Effect.



On topic:

Um.. Sure..

The examples I presented in the OP cannot be innocent typos because..


originally posted by: Pearj
Many, many instances of the same word typed 'incorrectly' in the Heading, and not in the body.

Many, many examples of the same issue with the same word but only in Headings in a professional word environment over a great span of years.

Any generalized way the topic of this post is stated, it's obvious the issue isn't a typo.






posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: Pearj

Oh my bad. I must have missed the part where it was obvious.

Well, best of luck my friend, in piecing this all together.

I shall leave you to it.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 07:16 PM
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originally posted by: WakeUpBeer
a reply to: Pearj

Oh my bad. I must have missed the part where it was obvious.


The only obvious thing about this is that those examples in the OP are typos. Very clearly, by definition, typos. The only evidence presented that it is anything other than typos is the word "obviously." Which is all fine and well, considering what forum we're in, but I was actually thinking (erroneously, obviously) that there might be some other gravity defying explanation involved.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 07:21 PM
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So, just out of curiosity, do we have any of the editors in question on record claiming these are something more insidious than a common typo? Even one?

I'm just curious.
edit on 29-8-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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www.poynter.org...

Newspaper misspells its own name.

www.nytimes.com...

Misspelled Stevie Ray's last name.

www.wired.com...

Why is it so hard to find your own Typos?

www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk...

This one will blow your mind.


Mandela Effect. What a load of BS. Keep it coming though, the comedy is great.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

One hell of a case of mental gymnastics haha.

I never thought the day would come where typos were ME in action.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 08:15 PM
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You see typos can happen all the time. When someone is writing an article, it may not be formatted the way they want for final print, or not all capitalizations will be there. So for instance with Christopher Reeve. Maybe the writer is in a crunch for a deadline, and is just typing away. In a rush to format it properly for public viewing, they open up 'Find and Replace' in a word processor and type in the search term "reeve". The replacement word they intended was "Reeve". This will capitalize the name anywhere they just flew through on the keyboard while writing the article. But..if they just typo'd "Reeves" with a 'S', and hit "Change All", then they oopsied and screwed up. Nobody caught it before it went to print. Headlines could have been written after the fact by someone else, maybe they article was submitted to another person prior to print for final editing, and they thought his last name was "Reeves" instead of "Reeve".

These articles prove nothing.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 09:42 PM
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So this alleges the original content is being edited out? Yet they neglect to do the headings

It's been awhile since I coded websites. Some people do headings via another source file that gets uploaded to the server, so they might have forgotten this, . Or they set certain fonts to only appear in headings. I really can't remember.

However it's sloppy. I would have finished the job by checking 'find word on page' to be sure I got them all! Then again it's a tiresome job and I might not have

So let's hope whoever this editor is keeps on messing up. I suppose there's a way they could be hacking into websites changing things.

How about at a library looking for these newspaper articles that might not have been altered?

Or you can run the web address through the way back time machine to see how the page once was on a certain earlier date
I skyways thought it was Barbra but I think she might have changed her name at one point , a lot do. It was always sterling though.

I thought it was Niagara Falls too. I have a very old postcard of that but no idea where it is to check . It's from about 1972 when my sister went there


Interesting find though

edit on 29-8-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 09:45 PM
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a reply to: FarCrowd
That's very plausIble.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 09:53 PM
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a reply to: Pearj
I'll give you that is highly coincidental or suspect it's only in the headings or only in the body, but as I said these parts can be done independently of each other and like another said, not all one person is doing it and just spells it another way.

It's always been Christopher reeve. The other (original tv one I think) superman was also a reeve or reeves, so that may explain that screw up.

Also Celebes do change their names. Autocorrect or spellcheck running can change words and you don't notice.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 02:21 AM
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a reply to: violet
George Reeves. Who some manage to confuse with Steve.

edit on 8/30/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 02:57 AM
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everyone's trying to ether op but nobody can find evidence of the typos the other way around. whether it's real or not, it's pretty weird that the mistakes only happen in the titles and not the articles themselves. an explanation for this may be that someone writing the article would be typing the word or name multiple times. while drafting it it might be easier to spot a mistake because they're reading the names multiple times while the person writing the headline only reads the word once; the headline once (why would they draft a headline they just wrote). the person drafting the article might catch a typo in one of the instances and then go back and check if they did it again. The repeated reading of the name, if they knew how to spell it correctly in the first place, would be easier to notice if they kept reading that name multiple times within the article. not saying I think Niagara was ever spelled Niagra because I know that isn't the case I live right next to the falls, but this is definitely an interesting thread. do not understand why everyone is so butthurt on this stuff



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 06:18 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: Pearj
Or possibly because text is written by journalists and headings are written by sub-editors.
Different people make different spelling mistakes.


I have worked in the print industry for 36 years, from cut-and-paste to computers.
All text is spell-checked...lines and text.
I put the OP's samples down to bad proof-reading.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 06:24 AM
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Sorry, Rod Serling? It was definitely Sterling.

Schulz would have confused me into pronouncing it "shulez" instead of "shoolts".

Good work OP. If indeed these are errors from differences in headline editors vs. content editors we should be seeing a lot more examples of wrong in the header and correct in the body. We should also be seeing the opposite phenomena - the header having the correct spelling and the body the incorrect spelling (if its due to differences in editors/spell-checking habits).



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Orborus

Exactly.

I could see where if it were code that was making the changes, that it might get tripped up on headings and captions.

I really think the text is pulled in and wrapped then parsed. There's a bug in the code that causes the heading () to get passed on without the word replace.

It's not likely html, json or xml. If it were code, it's likely the wrapping is with something special I've never heard of... Something at a binary level that's incorporates changing images.

Maybe it occurs when this world melded with that world and the result is a "mashup", where errors are more likely.




posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: violet
George Reeves. Who some manage to confuse with Steve.


Very cool..

I've never heard of Steve or George, and I don't think anyone's confusing Chris with Steve or George - but I think it's cool I got a Phage response!!

Thanks man!!




edit on 30-8-2016 by Pearj because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:18 AM
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originally posted by: Orborus
Sorry, Rod Serling? It was definitely Sterling.

Schulz would have confused me into pronouncing it "shulez" instead of "shoolts".

Good work OP. If indeed these are errors from differences in headline editors vs. content editors we should be seeing a lot more examples of wrong in the header and correct in the body. We should also be seeing the opposite phenomena - the header having the correct spelling and the body the incorrect spelling (if its due to differences in editors/spell-checking habits).


It was never Rod Sterling...it always was and still is..Rod Serling.
I clearly remember thinking, as a young man, "Serling...sounds like Sterling"



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:57 AM
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originally posted by: fromtheskydown

originally posted by: Orborus
Sorry, Rod Serling? It was definitely Sterling.

Schulz would have confused me into pronouncing it "shulez" instead of "shoolts".

Good work OP. If indeed these are errors from differences in headline editors vs. content editors we should be seeing a lot more examples of wrong in the header and correct in the body. We should also be seeing the opposite phenomena - the header having the correct spelling and the body the incorrect spelling (if its due to differences in editors/spell-checking habits).


It was never Rod Sterling...it always was and still is..Rod Serling.
I clearly remember thinking, as a young man, "Serling...sounds like Sterling"


Yep, because sterling is an actual word in the English language, so people are conditioned to see sterling instead of serling. I'll bet if Rod were alive to ask, he would tell you people often referred to him by sterling when he was growing up.



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: Pearj
I don't think anyone's confusing Chris with Steve or George



Even though Chris and George both played superman?

Keep in mind, even if you'd never heard of George, all it takes is some editor somewhere getting them confused to perpetuate the confusion for years on end.

edit on 30-8-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: 711117
everyone's trying to ether op but nobody can find evidence of the typos the other way around.


If the headline is wrong and the article has it right that would indicate carelessness in the writing of the headline and would also indicate someone else probably wrote it.

If the spelling in the article was wrong and the headline writer knew or checked the correct spelling, they would probably go back and have the article corrected.




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