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Donald J. Trump Visiting African-American Communites To Offer A Better Way Forward!

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posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: burgerbuddy

BS. All week I've been hearing Repubs say Democrats are responsible for what's going on in urban communities. I haven't heard a single one of those Repubs say "Oh, but we actually control both the legislative branches and executive branches in most States. So maybe our laws and policies have something to do with it, too."

Or are you implying that Repubs are simply so incompetent at ruling States that they shouldn't be held responsible for the crime in the States and districts they control?
edit on 28-8-2016 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 10:00 PM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: burgerbuddy

BS. All week I've been hearing Repubs say Democrats are responsible for what's going on in urban communities. I haven't heard a single one of those Repubs say "Oh, but we actually control both the legislative branches and executive branches in most States. So maybe our laws and policies have something to do with it, too."

Or are you implying that Repubs are simply so incompetent at ruling States that they shouldn't be held responsible for the crime in the States and districts they control?


You do understand the difference between a state and city, right? Most of the issues that are affecting the black community are at the city level and in most of these major cities Democrats are usually are the helm.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 10:26 PM
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Trump refused invitations to speak to major black organizations like the NAACP, the National Urban League, the National Association of Black Journalists, etc. when he was campaigning as a nativist in the primaries.

Now at the eleventh hour it's finally dawned on him and his incompetent campaign why he's losing and he's desperately and cynically trying to pander to minority voters and fudge his stance on immigration.

Pretty funny, actually.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 12:44 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
The situation will not be fixed unless someone fixes it. Thus far, the administration's we have had, from both parties, have failed to fix anything. Thus, it logically comes down to a possible lose with one compared to a definite, historically proven lose with the other. That's the message.


But remember, there's local, state, and national solutions. Each one has a different sphere of responsibility and if you really look, there's a lot of programs that have made a difference. For instance, here in Dallas, Police Chief Brown (who met with Obama and as a group worked out policing guidelines) has made a lot of inroads in reducing police-on-citizen violence. I bet if you looked, you'd find wonderful programs at the city, region, county, and state areas. They're not national as a rule because what works for one area may not work for another.

And politics can help or block things...like the stupid mandated state testing for kids which makes the poor teachers teach to the test and not really educate the kids (and adds to the work load.)

Some of these programs have been hindered by both sides (particularly at a national level) - but some have helped (Habitat for Humanity, for instance.)


I'm tired of hearing it can't be done. A man is standing up and offering to fix it. Where is the harm in letting him try? It's already broken...

TheRedneck


Actually, all he's doing is saying"I can fix it" in a situation where even the best haven't been able to make much progress.... and he gives no details on how he intends to fix it. He hasn't showed any strong innovative tendencies (like, say, Elon Musk) and he hasn't shown any innovative management practices.

...and, frankly, there's the thousand-plus civil lawsuits for breaking his promises (contracts.) This does not suggest that he has ideas that can be applied in a complex situation.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 12:46 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

I was going to college to be a teacher once upon a time because of being inspired by teachers of my youth. Then I learned what teaching was like now, and well.

I'm not a teacher.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 02:07 AM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: burgerbuddy

BS. All week I've been hearing Repubs say Democrats are responsible for what's going on in urban communities. I haven't heard a single one of those Repubs say "Oh, but we actually control both the legislative branches and executive branches in most States. So maybe our laws and policies have something to do with it, too."

Or are you implying that Repubs are simply so incompetent at ruling States that they shouldn't be held responsible for the crime in the States and districts they control?


You do understand the difference between a state and city, right?

Obviously I understand the difference between a city and a State.



Most of the issues that are affecting the black community are at the city level and in most of these major cities Democrats are usually are the helm.

1. You do realize that State laws override local laws, right? And Governors are far more powerful than mayors. So either the Repubs at the State level are incompetent & don't know they wield power over local governments, or they're also responsible for the things going on in their states.

2. There are Hispanic & African American communities in virtually every single city in America, including in Republican controlled ones. So going by your logic, that means that Repubs are directly responsible for any issues affecting those minority communities, right?



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

To be honest a lot will depend on how much the locals want to improve the lives of their kids who will form the nucleus of the next generation. As other's of noted Trump will need a actual message to attract new voters into the GOP fold. I remain convinced that if Trump had been a serious presidential candidate he would have carried a effective message to the Dems traditional starting back in May , before Clinton had shored up her party's nomination.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 05:28 AM
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originally posted by: DelMarvel
Trump refused invitations to speak to major black organizations like the NAACP, the National Urban League, the National Association of Black Journalists, etc. when he was campaigning as a nativist in the primaries.

Now at the eleventh hour it's finally dawned on him and his incompetent campaign why he's losing and he's desperately and cynically trying to pander to minority voters and fudge his stance on immigration.

Pretty funny, actually.


I wonder will he bring some hot sauce and change his accent when he goes to pander?
Now that would be even funnier.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 06:05 AM
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a reply to: xpert11

But he'd given us almost a year's worth of material to work with by then.

His policy proposals may have carried him through the Republican primaries, but they're simply incompatible with the vast majority of left wing voters. And now he's seeing that he went so far with his rhetoric that he can't pivot from those proposals without losing his core supporters (like last week's attempt at softening his immigration proposals).



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 06:25 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
But he'd given us almost a year's worth of material to work with by then.


The gift who keeps on giving and giving.


His policy proposals may have carried him through the Republican primaries, but they're simply incompatible with the vast majority of left wing voters. And now he's seeing that he went so far with his rhetoric that he can't pivot from those proposals without losing his core supporters (like last week's attempt at softening his immigration proposals).


His policies have no appeal outside his core supporter base little alone with soft democratic voters. Trump will radically shrink the GOP's vote in the general election. The GOP chance to expand it's core supporter base relied on primary voters acting in a rational manner which clearly didn't happen.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 07:45 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

You're right. Local policies are the best solutions, but these can only exist where the Federal government allows them to. Your own example shows how Federal regulations must be open to local actions for the local actions to operate. For every successful local program, there are dozens which were never tried because they were blocked by Federal interference.


...the stupid mandated state testing for kids which makes the poor teachers teach to the test and not really educate the kids (and adds to the work load.)

Mandated by Federal regulations. Hilliary supports Common Core; Trump wants to return education to the states.


Some of these programs have been hindered by both sides (particularly at a national level) - but some have helped (Habitat for Humanity, for instance.)

My favorite charity. Thus far not Federally regulated, and extremely successful.


Actually, all he's doing is saying"I can fix it" in a situation where even the best haven't been able to make much progress.... and he gives no details on how he intends to fix it. He hasn't showed any strong innovative tendencies (like, say, Elon Musk) and he hasn't shown any innovative management practices.

Saying he can fix it is no different than what the "best" have been saying for so long. Both sides say it. The difference is that one side is saying, "I can fix it! I'm going to do more of what hasn't worked before, because it'll work this time," While the other says, "I can fix It! The problem is we're doing the same thing even after it fails over and over."

Given their record, and the fact that the same type of people have been elected time after time, I have trouble calling them the "best." There's been no one else to compare them to. Coming in first place is a given where there's no one else in the race, and the trophy for such a "win" is meaningless.

Details, as I have said before, are really an exercise in futility. In any successful endeavor, there will be course corrections based on results. That means the details will change as time goes on, or, as we are used to seeing, more attention is paid to the promised details than to the final result. Core values, i.e. morality, is what matters. Is the person being honest about their goals, and is the person determined enough to reach those goals?

As for Trump's business practices, he's obviously doing something right. He may not be Elon Musk, but Elon has been on the verge of personal bankruptcy (as opposed to business bankruptcy) more than once. They do also have one thing in common: both tend to surround themselves with people who can get the job done. Trump has also got a history of hiring practices that were color- and gender-blind before it was fashionable. I'd say that was innovative at the time... he just didn't walk around tooting his own horn over it. That's what politicians do, not what businessmen do.

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: xpert11

"Star Trek" originally had Scotty as their Chief Engineer. He was cast as a miracle worker who always somehow managed to pull off the impossible to save the day. In a future series based on the original show, Geordi LaForge, the newest Chief Engineer, met the famous Scotty. I will never forget what Scotty told him:

"Ya dinna tell him how long it will really take? How willya keep yer reputation as a miracle worker doing that?" (insert bad Scottish brogue here)

Timing.

Trump has used shock and awe to gain name recognition. It worked. I'd bet more people know the name Trump than know who Obama is right now. Now, a couple months before the election, he's moving to establish his electability. He knows his opponent and he knows her weaknesses. He may look crazy, but I think he's crazy like a fox.

Polls don't determine who wins. The winner is who gets the votes on November 8. It's still August.

TheRedneck



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 08:10 AM
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originally posted by: xpert11

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
But he'd given us almost a year's worth of material to work with by then.


The gift who keeps on giving and giving.


His policy proposals may have carried him through the Republican primaries, but they're simply incompatible with the vast majority of left wing voters. And now he's seeing that he went so far with his rhetoric that he can't pivot from those proposals without losing his core supporters (like last week's attempt at softening his immigration proposals).


His policies have no appeal outside his core supporter base little alone with soft democratic voters. Trump will radically shrink the GOP's vote in the general election. The GOP chance to expand it's core supporter base relied on primary voters acting in a rational manner which clearly didn't happen.

I agree. In fact, the original plan after the 2012 election was for the GOP to expand its base by appealing to minority groups, particularly with Hispanic Americans and African Americans. There were even attempts to appeal to younger voters. But Trump and his supporters annihilated that plan.

Ironically, the same thing happened after the 2008 election. The GOP party leaders tried to broaden the appeal of the party by reaching out to minority groups. They even had Michael Steele as the Chairman of the RNC, which was ironic because I actually liked Steele from before his stint as chairman. But the Tea Party movement crushed that outreach approach, too.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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The important thing is that African Americans (overall), free themselves from their current mindset, and strongly consider what a more prosperous economy can mean for them.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: carewemust



The important thing is that African Americans (overall), free themselves from their current mindset


What "mindset" would that be?



and strongly consider what a more prosperous economy can mean for them.


"Them"?

I think everyone believes a more prosperous economy is a good thing. Not sure Donald Trump and the Republicans have any idea how to to do that. Especially since the Republicans have held a majority over both houses and the higher ratio of state governors, and yet their emphasis hasn't been on jobs, it's been on "religious rights" and anti-abortion legislation that wind up hurting the economy every time!



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
The important thing is that African Americans (overall), free themselves from their current mindset, and strongly consider what a more prosperous economy can mean for them.


A "freed mindset" does not equal "a decent job waiting for you" when there are no jobs in the neighborhood or that you can reach by free public transportation.

While your intentions are noble, I would like to point out that the people with the strongest beliefs and faiths are usually the poorest of the community. Have you been to their churches? I have. Have you listened to them talk about "the power of God"? I have. The wealthy grow apathetic or disenfranchised. The last refuge of the poor is hope and faith.

And if hope and faith were that good at changing things, our society would be overturned in a month and the folks in the bad neighborhoods would be prospering at an astonishing rate while the upper middle class would be floundering in lost jobs and lost opportunities.

They need action, not "freed mindsets."



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
The important thing is that African Americans (overall), free themselves from their current mindset, and strongly consider what a more prosperous economy can mean for them.

The important thing is that some non-African Americans (like yourself), free themselves from their current mindset, and strongly consider that there are literally 10s of millions of African Americans, all with different personal and economic conditions & priorities.

So maybe, just maybe, if non-African Americans (like yourself) saw us as individual Americans with individual perspectives, you'd understand that there are a multitude of reasons why our communities & families overwhelmingly reject Trump and his policy proposals. (TLDR: There are a lot of reasons why most African Americans reject Trump; not just economic reasons.)

Not to mention, it's a bit naive for you to assume we don't remember the drastic difference between the economy under Clinton and the economy under Bush. Why would we want to go back to a Republican led economy? Republicans are constantly trying to cut social programs, cut public school funding, cut green technology programs, and more. How is that going to help poor neighborhoods? (note: most of us aren't even poor.) And why should we believe Trump's words about bringing jobs back to America when Trump has personally profited from making his brand name products overseas?



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: Blazemore2000

"Nah. I just hate liars."


Good thing to know you are not voting for Clinton.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

Not to mention, roughly 3/4 of us aren't "poor". This notion that we're all poor and living in violent, decrepit neighborhoods is also a major reason these lame outreach attempts are failing. Republicans don't even know us enough to know what our actual conditions are, much less what our individual and familial concerns are.

It would be like an Arab American Green Party candidate trying to appeal to white American communities by saying “You’re living in poverty. Your schools are no good. You have no jobs... Poverty. Rejection. Horrible education. No housing, no homes, no ownership... What the hell do you have to lose?” (note: Those are Trump's actual words.) It wouldn't take a rocket scientist to realize that candidate would get rejected hard from such a crappy attempt at pandering.

edit on 29-8-2016 by enlightenedservant because: clarified



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Byrd

Not to mention, roughly 3/4 of us aren't "poor". This notion that we're all poor and living in violent, decrepit neighborhoods is also a major reason these lame outreach attempts are failing. Republicans don't even know us enough to know what our actual conditions are, much less what our individual and familial concerns are.

It would be like an Arab American Green Party candidate trying to appeal to white American communities by saying “You’re living in poverty. Your schools are no good. You have no jobs... Poverty. Rejection. Horrible education. No housing, no homes, no ownership... What the hell do you have to lose?” (note: Those are Trump's actual words.) It wouldn't take a rocket scientist to realize that candidate would get rejected hard from such a crappy attempt at pandering.


You are arguing out of both sides of your mouth. On the one hand, we are constantly told how by those on the left how bad things are for black folks whether it is a social justice warrior, celebrity, or politician. Then on the other hand, when a conservative tries to address it, you claim thing aren't that bad...

Which one is it?

I do agree with you that the blacks are not all the same. However, it is a denial of reality to say what we are not monolithic when it comes to politics. Yes, we don't all vote 100% democrat, but 95% is pretty damn close.

Personally, I find most of us don't even know why we vote Democrat because when I talk to my fellow brothers and sisters, about policy issues, I find that many tend to have views diametrically opposed to the Democrat platform. School choice. Illegal immigration. Church issues.




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