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Mangled MH370 debris suggests high speed impact

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posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 10:55 AM
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A tour operator in Mozambique has found a piece of debris from MH370 that suggests the aircraft impacted at a high rate of speed when it crashed. The one meter by one meter piece carries a Boeing part number, and shows significant damage.

Other pieces found showed surprisingly little damage, leading to suggestions that the aircraft was under control and glided down to a relatively soft water landing. This piece contradicts that theory, although it's not clear if it was damaged before impact, or by the impact.

www.anglenews.com...

www.dailymail.co.uk...




posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 11:00 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

It's amazing after all this time we are literally still finding pieces, and the pieces are leading to more suggestive puzzles.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 11:10 AM
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As a sailor...trans pacific and trans atlantic...it is big ocean out there...trust me if you have not experienced the massive expanse of water in person you can not understand the scale they searchers are dealing with.
No surprise the plan has not been located...all memory of the plane will have faded to time and maybe, just maybe a great descendent will trip across and a very old antique airplane.
Cheer



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 11:32 AM
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Is it confirmed that it's from MH370?



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

Not yet, but it's off a Boeing, which almost certainly means it is. There's a Boeing number stamped on the piece.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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With every piece they find, it brings closer and closer the chance of finding and figuring out what and where it happened.

I hope they do find larger pieces of the plane and maybe someday the black boxes.
It is a mystery that should of been easy to solve in this day and age.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

And that's why I hate news in general. It literally would take 10 minutes of phone calls to identify the piece if they have a serial number from it, but they didn't, or at least didn't report it.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: Vector99

They have to track down where it's made. The Triple, like pretty much every commercial aircraft anymore is made around the world. They have to match where it came from, then figure out where it was made. That's part of what took so long with the original flaperon. It turned out it was made in Spain and they were on vacation when it was found.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yea, but you know yourself Zaph, that any number to be found is only going to be in one spot, and from that number it is easy to trace it to the production line and manufacturer. Either they found a number on it or they didn't. it's not like they have to scavenge the ocean itself, it's a piece with a manufacturer's make on it, and either they can decipher it or not. Saying they think it's from the plane is in my opinion sensationalistic journalism.

Also isn't there basically a carfax of airplane parts as well? Like piece A was moved to plane B for mechanics, etc...



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:30 PM
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I used to build aircraft components. Every component has a log book that follows it around as it is constructed. When two or more components are combined in a subassembly, their log books are also combined. The log book for one wing flap on a C-5B is a foot thick. The aircraft has 12 wing flaps. Give that some thought.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: Vector99

You don't just find a part in the field, break out your cell phone and start calling people about part numbers though. It has to get to investigators, they have to move it to where the other parts are, look it over, etc.

All aircraft specific records are kept by the airline, and in the maintenance records on the aircraft. Both were destroyed.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
I used to build aircraft components. Every component has a log book that follows it around as it is constructed. When two or more components are combined in a subassembly, their log books are also combined. The log book for one wing flap on a C-5B is a foot thick. The aircraft has 12 wing flaps. Give that some thought.

I wasn't sure, but I knew it had to exist.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I know for sure airline parts are interchanged between aircrafts. Is there really no log of this in general? I don't mean a government one, but a company one that indexes every part on every aircraft?



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: Vector99

Go read my post again. There is a record kept by the airline and on the aircraft in the logbook. Both were destroyed.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Hmphh, well that will put a damper on your downing. Why the hell would they destroy those records? That to me makes no sense.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:49 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Vector99

Go read my post again. There is a record kept by the airline and on the aircraft in the logbook. Both were destroyed.


Why was the one at the airlines destroyed? Sorry if it's common knowledge or anything, I don't know much about the situation.



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: Tjoran

It turned out that the director of maintenance at the time the flight went missing may have been... less than qualified for the job. He was head hunted from the smaller AirAsia. The Malaysia Aerospace Engineering section which repaired all the electrical systems, along with other parts, suffered a strange fire not long after the flight went missing, and the head of the department went missing too.

Interestingly after the fire, Malaysian police were not called. Also around the time of the fire, another aircraft had to divert after losing a generator in flight. Instead of the maintenance director giving details, the CEO did the briefing.


edit on 8/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm guessing none of that made the news, either.

Didn't that plane have all of the engineers some some new military breakthrough on it?

Engineers, gone... plane, gone... log book, gone in a mysterious fire... person in charge of log book, gone...

Proud new owner of the tech they just came up with? None other than our old friend Jacob Rothschild

No way that's in any way related, of course...



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

Except that the company already owned the patent. When you develop a patent while working for a company your name goes on it, but it belongs to the company. It doesn't go to an individual, it goes to the company.

The Asian division of the company worked on civil equipment, not military. That is the province of the US division.
edit on 8/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 01:42 PM
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debris was found moore than an year ago..if they by now still not can confirm its from mh370..
than its just whisfull thinking.....
air company's alway reporting if an plane looses some parts....?????????



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