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Astronomy Picture Of The Day - The Milky Way Sets

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posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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Wow! Make sure you either right click on the image and select "View Image" or use the link included to get a really good view of this.



This digitally stitched image of our Milky Way galaxy is as viewed from the Namibian desert, was put together by Juan Carlos Casado, taken in early August.
A panoramic view of horizon to horizon is amazing! You can clearly see the dark dust that obscures our view of the center of the galaxy, and at the same time make out the brightly lit nebulae.

Mars and Saturn are both visible in this picture too. This is truly a majestic view.

Astronomy Picture Of The Day, August 26




posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 03:24 PM
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Stunning... thank you for sharing this here


Nature always has a way of leaving us speechless, in all of its beauty and wonders.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 03:47 PM
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So stunning, it's almost scary!
Someone will come along and tell us that it is Nibiru making its approach.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 03:50 PM
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That's pretty impressive


It's dark enough that I can see it from where I live, but it just looks way milky.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: Zarniwoop

Yah, it really puts to shame my modest pictures I was able to take! My pics show more what it looks like to our eyes out here where I live in the woods:






posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Still a nice starry sky.... a little better than I have here. Consider yourself lucky



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 04:12 PM
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Thanks Eric.. .that IS awesome and I (and a few million others) have a new desktop background now.

I used to be able to see this after a 5 min drive, but my desert city has grown and it takes a lot longer to find true dark skies... sigh.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 04:14 PM
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I remember the first time I saw a clear night sky in proper dark conditions - it's something else.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 06:12 PM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
I remember the first time I saw a clear night sky in proper dark conditions - it's something else.


Yes me too.. In the Australian outback, it was a jaw dropping moment in my life that I will never forget..
If there is anyone that has never experienced it, If you do one thing in your life....

Back to the picture.. Thank you Eric that image is amazing.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

beautiful...

Wish i could get a view like that once in a while in the sky...

I'd be lucky if i get 20 stars on a good night




posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 08:04 PM
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Earths flat, fake af

Jk cool



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Thats awfully cool Eric. Wonder what ancient generations of Namibians thought of that in the night sky?



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 11:02 PM
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Stunning, I was for many years a active astronomer and would on occasion mount up a CCD camera but I was finding that buggering about with all the software and settings was actually taking me away from why I liked astronomy and that just looking at objects in the night sky even with a basic set of bins was very rewarding..

Anyone actually these days can take fantastic images just by purchasing a cheap used Meade ETX or similar scope and mount up a old DSLR/SLR on a mounting ring, set the lens to infinity and manual exposure (M setting on Cannon) and using a remote cord bang out a 15 minute exposure. The tracking of the scope will make sure you have no star shift in the frame but the depth you will get from the exposure esp with Higher ISO settings will be worth it and that is without worrying about enhancing which can take it all to another level.

I actually think one of the saddest things is that a good majority of the worlds population esp in Western society or city dwellers will never see the milky way due to copious amounts of light pollution, I myself living in London would have to make trips out to Arizona (Empire Ranch) for my astronomy fix as the weather and light pollution in the UK is so poor..

S+F


RA



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 11:21 PM
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a reply to: slider1982

Just imagine what the night skies used to look like before electricity came along... it must have been awe-inspiring to say the least.

The absolute best dark sky viewing I ever had in my life was several years ago camping high up in the British Columbia mountains, I took my telescope with me... I literally had tears streaming down my cheeks looking at the Hercules cluster (M13)... the clarity of being able to actually see the thousands of teeny tiny pinpoints of light that make up the cluster was something I had never seen before (at least not like that), nor have been able to see since.

That beautiful clear night still sits in my memory...

*sniffle*



posted on Aug, 27 2016 @ 03:29 AM
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This is now my desktop wallpaper. I love all the different colours of airglow, and of course the Milky Way itself. I wonder how much post-processing and enhancement has been done to the original images in this mosaic, though. Astrophotography is never really a "take a photo and post it on the Internet" affair; countless hours are spent tweaking the image this way and that in order to reduce unwanted effects and enhance the colours and the beauty of it.

That said, astrophotographers' own galleries are a sight to behold. www.twanight.org...

I was lucky enough to have seen the Milky Way as a fairly noticeable hazy band of light across the whole sky, when I lived in an Estonian village.



posted on Aug, 27 2016 @ 03:36 AM
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It was a really clear sky in Norfolk, UK last night. Home again tonight but hoping we get some clear nights again soon so I can get out with the camera and wide angle lens to try some night shots.
Not many places where I live are dark enough but along the Norfolk coast there are some good spots I can try.



posted on Aug, 27 2016 @ 03:47 AM
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Freaking Mandela effect.

Since when was the milky way shaped like a giant rainbow?



posted on Aug, 27 2016 @ 03:52 AM
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a reply to: GoShredAK




Since when was the milky way shaped like a giant rainbow?

Since digital imagery and compositing techniques made it easy to condense 140º of horizon into one image.
www.diyphotography.net...

I get way out on the water once in a while. The Galactic belt is not shaped like a rainbow.

edit on 8/27/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2016 @ 04:03 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Roger that.

I don't really buy that all the stars shifted around. Just throwing that out there to see a reaction.

Sometimes, during the winter months we get a beautiful clear view of the milky way from up here in Alaska. If I look up this year and its shaped like a rainbow then ill be freaking out. I don't suspect it will be however.


edit on 27-8-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-8-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2016 @ 07:11 AM
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I'm glad you all enjoyed the picture.

Stars for everyone!








 
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