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Space Enthusiasts!why is there no info on that Juno Jupiter probe?

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posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: PandaPrincess


everyone has forgotten about it


Nope. We are just waiting. You can't rush proper science.




posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 05:19 PM
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People these days are so used to getting what they want right here and right now!

As is the case with most space missions, when photos and other data are taken by the spacecraft, they are first analysed by the mission control team and scientists working for them. It's their prerogative, and gives them a chance to write science papers about any new findings they might get from that data. Images are usually released to the public several days or weeks later.

This isn't a live-streaming reality show, it's a science mission.



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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its nothing to do with `now now now`

my point is, why arent we getting any news such as `confirmation that juno has photographed it and we will get the raw data in a day or two`

there is simplyy nothing at all for 3 weeks now, of current news about it

thats what i find baffling

theres simply nothing at all about its most recent approach!



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess

Juno turned off basically everything but the star tracker on the way to Jupiter. It's going to be about a month after it enters orbit before we see any pictures. It's going to take time to turn everything back up and make sure it's operating correctly. The science portion of the mission won't start until October. There's no news, because right now it's nothing but "We turned the camera back on, and it seems to be working". Or, "We turned on this instrument and it's working".
edit on 8/25/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:13 PM
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@Zaphod58

they said we would get the pics around the 23rd of august

it was in all the papers!!



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess

Just because they got them on the 23rd doesn't meant that they were going to release them five minutes later. They are going to do their analysis and whatever else they do with them, and then they're release them. Science comes first.



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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i want to see the pictures !!



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess

And they will be released when they are good and ready to release them.



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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@zap okay but i just find it strange again that there is simply nothing about it anymore

i cant wait to see close ups of the big storm on jupiter -- THE SIZE OF EARTH which has been raging for over 300 years!!!




posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess

Like I said, the science mission doesn't start until October or November. There's nothing to report right now, so there's no news. When the science mission starts, there will be news to report so there will be more. Same when the pictures finally start coming out.



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess
Actually, the closest approach hasn't happened yet. NASA just reported:

This Saturday, NASA's Juno Mission to Jupiter will get closer to the cloud tops of the planet than at any other time during its prime mission. At the moment of closest approach, Juno will be about 2,500 miles (4,200 kilometers) above Jupiter's swirling clouds and traveling at 130,000 mph (208,000 kilometers per hour).

solarsystem.nasa.gov...

There have been very few updates in the last few weeks because Juno was on a very long trajectory, so all it did was a few "burns" and taking the images for the "Marble Movie". For details of that, see the other Juno thread in this forum.


A handful of JunoCam images, including the highest resolution imagery of the Jovian atmosphere and the first glimpse of Jupiter's north and south poles, are expected to be released during the later part of next week.


So there you go.
edit on 25-8-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: PandaPrincess
@zap okay but i just find it strange again that there is simply nothing about it anymore

i cant wait to see close ups of the big storm on jupiter -- THE SIZE OF EARTH which has been raging for over 300 years!!!



That's like complaining that after the announcement that the HIGGS was discovered, not much new and exciting news came out of CERN.

This is science my friend. Rare exciting bits with lots and lots and lots and lots and lots and lots of boring work in between.

Which is precisely why I never persued working at CERN after studying physics at uni in the late 90s, even though it had been a life long dream. I found the information incredibly fascinating but the actual tedious work to get to it unbearable. Truth be told, I also wasn't smart enough and I realised that too. But the part about me finding the scientific process boring is true.

So there you go, just be patient. We are all waiting for the beautiful images Juno will grace us with.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 01:35 AM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess

The information hasn't been reassembled as of yet. It's going to be released next month.

Then there will be all the hurrah you could ever want. Just be patient.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: PandaPrincess

Nasa's Juno probe to make closest pass of Jupiter


Nasa’s Juno spacecraft will make its closest pass of Jupiter on Saturday when it soars over the swirling cloud tops of the solar system’s largest planet at more than 125,000 miles per hour.

The close encounter will be the first time the $1.1bn (£840m) probe has its full suite of cameras and scientific instruments switched on and turned towards the planet as it flies overhead at an altitude of 2,600 miles.

Mission scientists expect the spacecraft to capture the most spectacular images of the planet yet and reveal in unprecedented detail what lies beneath Jupiter’s thick blanket of cloud.

The flyby at 1.51pm BST will be the first opportunity for Juno to get so close to the gas giant since the probe arrived in orbit on 4 July. When the spacecraft reached Jupiter, all of its scientific instruments were shut down to ensure nothing interfered with the crucial braking manoeuvre needed to stop Juno from barrelling past the planet.

The spacecraft is now on a highly elliptical orbit that takes it far away from Jupiter’s dangerous radiation belts before swinging back in and passing close over the north and south poles that flicker with brilliant aurorae more than 1,000 times brighter than those on Earth.


click link for article



posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 11:35 AM
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posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 11:37 AM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Some news


solarsystem.nasa.gov...

I think it's best to keep the updates and images to this thread, which was created specifically for this.




posted on Aug, 28 2016 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Ahh - missed that one



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Some news


solarsystem.nasa.gov...

I think it's best to keep the updates and images to this thread, which was created specifically for this.



Cheers buddy.



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