It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

My Most recent thoughts about the laws of Physics

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:09 PM
link   
I think a lot, and sometimes i just have to throw ideas out there to get feedback. my most recent one is : how to go about reversing the laws of physics in a localized area for various reasons and applied areas of use of such "Technology" (not sure if i posted in the correct forum). I hope i can get some constructive thoughts about the topic from you guys, and be gentle with me, its been years since i have done some real thinking




posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:16 PM
link   
a reply to: darkspace


how to go about reversing the laws of physics in a localized area for various reasons and applied areas of use of such "Technology"

Larger yield from ever larger weapons, the first application of which will always be to destroy.



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:20 PM
link   
a reply to: intrptr

-_- yes, unfortunately you're right about that one, IntrPtr. but lets leave the Weaponizing part for now



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:23 PM
link   
If you could actually reverse the Laws of Physics, they wouldn't be very good laws, would they? It's not as if you can vote on them.



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: schuyler
If you could actually reverse the Laws of Physics, they wouldn't be very good laws, would they? It's not as if you can vote on them.
what about CP-symmetry?



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: darkspace
a reply to: intrptr

-_- yes, unfortunately you're right about that one, IntrPtr. but lets leave the Weaponizing part for now

We don't have that kind of power. Reversing the laws of physics, whatever that means, would require enormous energy.

Like Black Hole energy, for instance.



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:40 PM
link   
a reply to: intrptr

yes, i would agree to that assumption if it was global reversal, but in an localized area. in a 1 m by 1 m square for example. when particle physics and quantum theory are applied, the standard model gets expanded and allows for reversal of the basic laws of physics, like Anti-gravity



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: darkspace

originally posted by: schuyler
If you could actually reverse the Laws of Physics, they wouldn't be very good laws, would they? It's not as if you can vote on them.
what about CP-symmetry?


What about it? Is it more likely that the Laws of Physics were "violated," or that the Laws of Physics are not completely understood or the "Law" is misstated? This kind of thing happens all the time. For example, in string theory there were originally several different "types" that were mutually exclusive. It was thought they couldn't all be correct. Then along came M theory which showed these different variations were actually different ways of looking at the same thing. The original "types" were shown to be misinterpretations. There was no contradiction at all.

It's not as if you can willfully "violate" the Laws of Physics to some end. If you can show an apparent "violation," all that means is that you don't understand the law or it is mis-stated. If you managed to invent an "anti-gravity" device, does that mean you just violated the Law of Gravity? Of course not. You would have managed to utilize gravity for your benefit. It's not like being able to break the speed limit and get away with it.



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:48 PM
link   
a reply to: schuyler

WoW! i just love your answer here
you are absolutely correct, and a lot better than me to describe this. English is my second language, and its not easy to describe everything i think about, when i am not sure which words do use
Thank you



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 12:52 PM
link   
Maybe reversal of the laws of physics is a wrong description, and "Evolution" or "expansion" of the laws of physics is a better one?



posted on Aug, 20 2016 @ 01:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: darkspace
a reply to: intrptr

yes, i would agree to that assumption if it was global reversal, but in an localized area. in a 1 m by 1 m square for example. when particle physics and quantum theory are applied, the standard model gets expanded and allows for reversal of the basic laws of physics, like Anti-gravity
yes you do need to break the laws of physics to acheive anti gravity. i invite you to read the thread in my signature to get some glimpses



posted on Aug, 21 2016 @ 02:19 AM
link   
In my opinion a lot of knowledge was hidden from us like vacuum energy. The universe is literally vibrating because of all the mass(stars/planets) moving around producing gravity waves everywhere(plus space is expanding at the same time). The electron is the key to anti-gravity. It is fluid but shaped by gravity waves into a ball, orbiting atoms in gravity "troughs/electron orbits" created from waves reflecting off the atom. With enough electricity flowing(millions of volts) in a Toroidal/doughnut shape I think you could block the outside gravity off and maintain the current state of gravity inside the toroid. Check out the video on the "fluxliner" supposedly built in the 1950s, a faster than light craft. Pretty sure the technology comes from Einstein, Tesla, and Victor Schauberger. Definitely a interesting watch.

At 1 electron volt, gravity overpowers the electrons, but increase the voltage and you overcome gravity kind of like how electrons can hop atom to atom when more power is applied. As for making the toroid shape? Magnets do that naturally.
edit on 21-8-2016 by AnonymousTi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2016 @ 12:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: darkspace
Maybe reversal of the laws of physics is a wrong description, and "Evolution" or "expansion" of the laws of physics is a better one?
The laws of nature exist. They are thought to have evolved briefly in the early universe right after the big bang from high energy physics we don't understand to the more normal energy physics we somewhat understand.

I think there is no more evolution, or expansion of nature's laws of physics. The problem is that man's laws of physics are imperfect representations of nature's laws of physics, so we put efforts into changing the former wherever possible to be more like the latter, which is the main goal of science.

Where there is a "reversal" of a law of physics, technically that's an inaccurate description. It was a reversal of Man's law of physics which was an imperfect representation of the actual natural law of nature. For example we have reversed the second law of thermodynamics for short times on small scales, but this was because our description of the law was imperfect. With a more rigorous description of nature and natural laws, we find that this so-called "reversal" can actually be predicted and it doesn't really violate natural law.

edit on 2016821 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join