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SCI/TECH: Getting the lead out: European rules force U.S. electronics companies to clean up

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posted on Jan, 20 2005 @ 02:13 PM
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U.S. companies are reworking their production and recycling efforts in order to comply with tough European Union rules. The side benefit is being seen here in the United States. The U.S. rules on items such as lead and other toxic substances are weaker than those in Europe. However, a 25 company consortium is changing the way technology companies do business here in the States as well.

 



sfgate.com
Like the gas in your car, your next cell phone and computer are likely to be lead-free.

What's more, you very well might be able to dispose of that phone and computer at no cost, taking advantage of free recycling programs offered by the manufacturers.

Technology and consumer electronics companies are going greener, and much of the credit goes to the European Union. A series of laws and regulations put in place by the 25-nation consortium is changing the way tech companies do business.

Despite weaker laws in the United States, many Silicon Valley companies are working hard to meet new European Union rules on such matters as electronics recycling, toxic substances and chemicals. The EU's stringent recycling standard, requiring manufacturers to reuse electronics waste, is being phased in and will be fully in effect by the end of 2006.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Intel will soon be making lead free processors and recycling programs that are free are popping up all over the Silicon Valley. It is good to see that these companies are applying these changes across the board and not 2 sets of standards. I hope that this will also extend to their operations in third world countries as well.



[edit on 1/20/05 by FredT]




posted on Jan, 20 2005 @ 02:16 PM
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You see, some of our red-tape and interfering with the market is a good thing (and certainly nothing they were ever going to do themselves).



posted on Jan, 20 2005 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by sminkeypinkey
You see, some of our red-tape and interfering with the market is a good thing (and certainly nothing they were ever going to do themselves).


sminkey, I wonder if we can get "launch aid" from the EU for the programs? Sorry, i mean repayable loans



posted on Jan, 20 2005 @ 04:09 PM
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I just wish the EU had "forced" this change for decent reasons, instead as a way of increasing costs for the US to compete in European markets. Not sure if the end justifies the means, but the end is a good one.

Now hopefully we don't find out in 5 years that EU member states aren't following their own standards...but, that'd *never* happen...



posted on Jan, 20 2005 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by Phugedaboudet
I just wish the EU had "forced" this change for decent reasons, instead as a way of increasing costs for the US to compete in European markets. Not sure if the end justifies the means, but the end is a good one.


- What are you on about?

These regs apply to all firms sellinmg within the EU niot just US firms.



Now hopefully we don't find out in 5 years that EU member states aren't following their own standards...but, that'd *never* happen...


- Whilst there will probably always be a fringe element that attempt to 'compete' by cheating the rules the fact remains that by far the story will be one of compliance by all the reputable EU companies.



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