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Bug Out Bags - Series of Questions

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posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:02 PM
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I know there are threads on Bug out Bags and survival gear but I had a series of questions about them.

Everyone's needs are different depending on area (Desert, Mountain, Ocean, colder Climate, Forest, Urban area), family, medical/fitness condition, Time of year, Skill Set.

A snare might not help someone survive if they've never hunted, at least for those critical 3 or so days. So it might be relatively useless to some. Do you have a specific purpose such as if you live in New Orleans and you needed to leave your house quickly and survive for 3 days before Fema could get to you or is it to grab your documents, some cash and individual specific supplies like diapers, heart medication, insulin, eye glasses and hit the woods because nuclear war has started or some other scenario of the SHTF.

Here's the questions.

1. Are there 10 or so general items that everyone should have? I kept the number at 10 because you need some room for your personal gear and it can't be too heavy that you can't carry it for a long distance.
2. What is your purpose for the bag? A Katrina type event or for a worse case scenario?
3. If you have a family, do they all have a bug out bag or is it different for them, meaning you can have knife, flint, tent...they only carry food, flashlight and medical supplies.
4. Do you carry any water or canteen or just a water straw type device?
5. Do you have a budget? $100 per bag--cheaper or $200-$1,000 for better bag and items?
6. Would you suggest buying a pre-made bag for a couple of hundred as long as it contained what you thought you need?
7. Or last case scenario..you have all the stuff you could possibly need at the house...plenty of backpacks and bags and you'd just be able to wing it and make it up on the spot if you had to leave.

Thanks mates!




posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: amazing

A handful of items should be in every bag, and they are very basic.

Rope, quality outdoor knife, fire starter (there are a number of things that would suffice), and a basic first aid kit are certainly mandatory items IMO.

The rest can be filled in with items that would be base on the individuals needs, geography, proximity to bodies of water and so on.

The best place to retreat to is a coastal area IMO, because you can just take off on water and return as you need. Even if its just a raft with a trolling motor. Next best IMO would be forested mountains. Those dry dusty mountains can provide cover, but not much else. The forested mountains will give cover, food, building materials, maybe even water access. I stay close to the coasts though myself.

My bug out bag has batteries, foil, and a magnifying glass as well. the batteries can help out start a fire when foil is on the ends.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:15 PM
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BoBs are fun, but let me ask you this. Where are you gonna be when you grab that BoB and where are you gonna go?



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: AmericanRealist
a reply to: amazing

A handful of items should be in every bag, and they are very basic.

Rope, quality outdoor knife, fire starter (there are a number of things that would suffice), and a basic first aid kit are certainly mandatory items IMO.

The rest can be filled in with items that would be base on the individuals needs, geography, proximity to bodies of water and so on.

The best place to retreat to is a coastal area IMO, because you can just take off on water and return as you need. Even if its just a raft with a trolling motor. Next best IMO would be forested mountains. Those dry dusty mountains can provide cover, but not much else. The forested mountains will give cover, food, building materials, maybe even water access. I stay close to the coasts though myself.

My bug out bag has batteries, foil, and a magnifying glass as well. the batteries can help out start a fire when foil is on the ends.


What about a body bag/sleeping bag/blanket? Then maybe 3 MREs and a water straw?



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:16 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
BoBs are fun, but let me ask you this. Where are you gonna be when you grab that BoB and where are you gonna go?


So they're all location specific then. Like, being in Las Vegas...I have immediate desert/heat conditions and low water, but I have mountains with cooler temps, water sources and wood, several hours hike away.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:21 PM
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1. Are there 10 or so general items that everyone should have? I kept the number at 10 because you need some room for your personal gear and it can't be too heavy that you can't carry it for a long distance.

A: Fire starter, food, hand crank/solar radio with weather band, water, water purification, paracord (even good for making that snare, lol), essential medications, survival manual, a weapon, and KNOWLEDGE.


2. What is your purpose for the bag? A Katrina type event or for a worse case scenario?

A: I try to keep my bag(s) very generalized. Things that will help in any emergency. A good rule of thumb that even government agencies suggest is to plan for a zombie apocalypse, as if you are prepared for that, you're prepared for anything.

3. If you have a family, do they all have a bug out bag or is it different for them, meaning you can have knife, flint, tent...they only carry food, flashlight and medical supplies.

A: I do not have a family, but if I did, they would all have bags, even kids.

4. Do you carry any water or canteen or just a water straw type device?

I carry 3 liters of water, a life straw and purification tablets. I also know how to make a gravity filter.

5. Do you have a budget? $100 per bag--cheaper or $200-$1,000 for better bag and items?

A: No budget. You will never stick to a budget, no amount of money is worth your life. Your bag will never be "done" or "enough."

6. Would you suggest buying a pre-made bag for a couple of hundred as long as it contained what you thought you need?

A: My bag started out as a premade kit from Food Insurance, and has evolved every week since I got it. Some things were great (the food), some needed upgrades (the radio).

7. Or last case scenario..you have all the stuff you could possibly need at the house...plenty of backpacks and bags and you'd just be able to wing it and make it up on the spot if you had to leave.

A: No, do not go trying to stuff things into bags 10 minutes after SHTF.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:26 PM
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The whole collection of Naked and Afraid episodes on DVD is essential. Like someone said, you can run, but where are you going to go? Some areas are better if you just stay put. Knowing the land is far better then trying to survive in the unknown.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: Snarl

I keep a day bag with me everywhere. Shopping, at work, etc.

I keep my BoB in the Jeep.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: 38181
The whole collection of Naked and Afraid episodes on DVD is essential. Like someone said, you can run, but where are you going to go? Some areas are better if you just stay put. Knowing the land is far better then trying to survive in the unknown.


But this is more like a Katrina situation, where you're entire house is going to be flooded...structural damage and you have to leave...Maybe you can carry a bag with you as you make your way to the football stadium where no other help, food or assistance is coming to you for 2-3 days. Or some type of situation where you have to go.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: amazing

originally posted by: Snarl
BoBs are fun, but let me ask you this. Where are you gonna be when you grab that BoB and where are you gonna go?


So they're all location specific then. Like, being in Las Vegas...I have immediate desert/heat conditions and low water, but I have mountains with cooler temps, water sources and wood, several hours hike away.

I've got a bag I keep in each of my vehicles. Their purpose is to get me home. At home I've got nothing except weapons, armor and clothing (they're all heavy enough). In the woods I've got a stash ... I've just gotta get there.

I'd hate to be in Vegas and have to think of hiking out amidst a bunch of others doing the same thing. I'd be mostly concerned about dehydration or some form of rescue/evac. Like I said, BoBs are fun, but they've got to suit your immediate needs.

Prep a bug out site if you can. It's a bit more expensive. If it can't be found ... it can't be looted ... and this a measure of safety you're looking for. Sorry I went off-topic.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: Snarl

Like minds think alike. I have stashed "supplies" stashed all over this city, and even in two other states that I rarely visit. My Western stash is sill untouched, I confirmed that last month. Everything is still there and good to go.

I have not checked on my stash in northern Louisiana though. I hope its ok, its been two years. No food is not in either of those. Food can be found as we travel. But I do keep canned goods where I live which I rotate every year.

One device that may be useful as a "jack of all trades" is the Crovel.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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The need for a semi-permanent site is important. Especially important is to tell any close friends/relatives where to meet you. Do not tell anyone you do not trust, and never broadcast the location on any phone, cell phone, internet, or other electronic device.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: Excallibacca

Well thats going into rally point. Even your closest friends do not need to know the location of your site, only the rally point. And perhaps a secondary rally point if circumstances make it difficult to stay at the first one.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: amazing

I take a Hiking backpack (so pretty tall and reasonably wide with outside pockets/netting and clips/straps). I have a large water bottle strapped on the front of the bag, a small pop up tent on the side, a sleeping bag on the other side. Inside is a mixture of good travel foods like peanut butter and trailmix, hygiene products like odourless wetwipes, anti-bact handwash, bio soap, a book, a small on-the-go cooker, clothes washing gel, some string, a couple of lighters, a small box of matches and a steel/flint. A hand towel and a small personal sponge. And finally lightwieght clothes and a set of heavy clothes (warmth)

Oh and a knife and knife sized saw.
edit on 16-8-2016 by WanderingNomadd because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: AmericanRealist

Exactly right. My girlfriend hasn't even earned rally point knowledge.



posted on Aug, 16 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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Just a suggestion dehydrated food is a good idea keep that handy lightweight easy to prepare all you need is warm water and Stir It Up and you have instant food another suggestion is become a ham radio operator no longer requires Morse code is strictly a written exam and with ham radio you can stay in touch with the outside world and find out what's going on and if you don't want to do that at least get a shortwave radio that can receive short wave this is just a suggestion I have Been a licensed Ham radio operator since 1989 and it will come in handy if TSHTF . Just a Suggestion .



posted on Aug, 17 2016 @ 12:29 AM
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originally posted by: amazing
I know there are threads on Bug out Bags and survival gear but I had a series of questions about them.

Everyone's needs are different depending on area (Desert, Mountain, Ocean, colder Climate, Forest, Urban area), family, medical/fitness condition, Time of year, Skill Set.

A snare might not help someone survive if they've never hunted, at least for those critical 3 or so days. So it might be relatively useless to some. Do you have a specific purpose such as if you live in New Orleans and you needed to leave your house quickly and survive for 3 days before Fema could get to you or is it to grab your documents, some cash and individual specific supplies like diapers, heart medication, insulin, eye glasses and hit the woods because nuclear war has started or some other scenario of the SHTF.

Here's the questions.

1. Are there 10 or so general items that everyone should have? I kept the number at 10 because you need some room for your personal gear and it can't be too heavy that you can't carry it for a long distance.
2. What is your purpose for the bag? A Katrina type event or for a worse case scenario?
3. If you have a family, do they all have a bug out bag or is it different for them, meaning you can have knife, flint, tent...they only carry food, flashlight and medical supplies.
4. Do you carry any water or canteen or just a water straw type device?
5. Do you have a budget? $100 per bag--cheaper or $200-$1,000 for better bag and items?
6. Would you suggest buying a pre-made bag for a couple of hundred as long as it contained what you thought you need?
7. Or last case scenario..you have all the stuff you could possibly need at the house...plenty of backpacks and bags and you'd just be able to wing it and make it up on the spot if you had to leave.

Thanks mates!


If one were to require a Bug-Out bag one would have to have a bug-out LOCATION or DESTINATION and this will tell you what you need in your BOB.......where are you and where do you and your loved ones have to get to.....what will in take bare-bones to get y'all there.

A good rule of thumb is to first look at distance then time then water requiremens and weight ...you will need to carry a specific volume of water to travel a specific time limit and cover a specific distance,ideally your BOB would get you to your 1st Cache of supplies you have stowed ahead of time for you AND your company expected and unexpected along your BUG-OUT ROUTE.

If Grandma needs 4 gallons of water to make it to the cache site to resupply SOMEONE has to hump it along and this is one of a CONSTELLATION of details.



posted on Aug, 17 2016 @ 01:16 AM
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1 would consider a good survival to have one or more of these, if near water regions.


aaaliferafts.com...

As many NBC suits for your families and friends


A pharmaceutical regimen of medications, and equipment.

Satellite phones and other recharged pads etc. just incase theres a chance of communications present.

Hunting and combat materials, for hunting and protection of families.

Compass - star & planet / land physical maps. Complex maps locating best global gathering locations for agriculture, research and defenses.

Portable generators, lots of matches, antibacterial soaps.

Compressed foods Raman noodles, dry rice's -noodles that can be water activated without being heated. Jerkys. Teas-coffees for caffeine boost incase long hikes or late night watches required...

Flash lights and inferred night visions if obtainable, inferred flash techs.

CB or similar radio devices, equipment...

NAMASTE*******



posted on Aug, 17 2016 @ 02:18 AM
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originally posted by: Ophiuchus 13
1 would consider a good survival to have one or more of these, if near water regions.


aaaliferafts.com...

As many NBC suits for your families and friends


A pharmaceutical regimen of medications, and equipment.

Satellite phones and other recharged pads etc. just incase theres a chance of communications present.

Hunting and combat materials, for hunting and protection of families.

Compass - star & planet / land physical maps. Complex maps locating best global gathering locations for agriculture, research and defenses.

Portable generators, lots of matches, antibacterial soaps.

Compressed foods Raman noodles, dry rice's -noodles that can be water activated without being heated. Jerkys. Teas-coffees for caffeine boost incase long hikes or late night watches required...

Flash lights and inferred night visions if obtainable, inferred flash techs.

CB or similar radio devices, equipment...

NAMASTE*******


You will need all of this AND at a minimum 100 more people or you are on a short walk down a long path.

People think they will be shooting it up with roving gangs of looters and do not think that so few people could be left that lifetimes could easily be spent before new to you survivors are even found............it might take many years just to gather viable breeding groups.



posted on Aug, 17 2016 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: amazing

All you need is to cache your main survival gear near the place you plan bugging out. Buy cheap abandoned shack in pine or oak area and stack your gear around. Keep the shack looks abandoned especially if you plan to stack some supplies inside. Use rusty chains and old locks. Do triple safety. If it looks pretty you're doing something wrong. Have a motorbike in your garage always full with enough gas to bring you there. And non the last, don't buy places without natural springs in the area. Also if you have neighbors there make sure they start like you before SHTF. All dumb farmers in the end could be very useful allies, especially when they feel you part of the family. In my case I am missing only the motorbike, but the old Punto will get me there in 75 mins as well.


edit on 17-8-2016 by ratskin32 because: (no reason given)



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