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Mandela Effect - Kidney Proof - Internal Organs Changed Position

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posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

of course you find explanation of how the curve is made..its real...but now the location of our solar system is different..our distance towards this arm is different allowing some time lapse photos to bend it this much , before we were located away a certain amount that you can leave the camera on all night long and it will still be a line




posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

ok let me re phrase, and not throw everything like this ...

the possibility of the arm to curve like this in a photo is real

in this reality though...not before



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: heineken
a reply to: Greggers

be honest..did you ever saw the milky way like this before 2012 ??

bare in mind..you dont have to struggle to encounter this


@Greggers

if you can answer this...you named before the shape of the arm...i only hope you are honest enough



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: heineken
a reply to: Greggers

ok let me re phrase, and not throw everything like this ...

the possibility of the arm to curve like this in a photo is real

in this reality though...not before




The center of the galaxy does not curve.
The curvature is caused by a composite image artifact.

The reason people may not have seen an image like that in the past is because the type of computer processing required for the average joe to stitch together composites like that has only become mainstream in RECENT history.

The internet and the mass proliferation of computer technology and digital cameras has made this type of image much more likely.



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: heineken

originally posted by: heineken
a reply to: Greggers

be honest..did you ever saw the milky way like this before 2012 ??

bare in mind..you dont have to struggle to encounter this


@Greggers


if you can answer this...you named before the shape of the arm...i only hope you are honest enough


First of all, we're not talking about a spiral arm. We're talking about the center of the galaxy. I said it was shaped like a pregnant python. It is. It's flat with a bulge in the middle which is brighter and denser. It does not in any way resemble a rainbow.



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: Greggers

originally posted by: heineken
a reply to: Greggers

ok let me re phrase, and not throw everything like this ...

the possibility of the arm to curve like this in a photo is real

in this reality though...not before




The center of the galaxy does not curve.
The curvature is caused by a composite image artifact.

The reason people may not have seen an image like that in the past is because the type of computer processing required for the average joe to stitch together composites like that has only become mainstream in RECENT history.

The internet and the mass proliferation of computer technology and digital cameras has made this type of image much more likely.



how what you are saying explains this ?




posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: heineken

originally posted by: Greggers

originally posted by: heineken
a reply to: Greggers

ok let me re phrase, and not throw everything like this ...

the possibility of the arm to curve like this in a photo is real

in this reality though...not before




The center of the galaxy does not curve.
The curvature is caused by a composite image artifact.

The reason people may not have seen an image like that in the past is because the type of computer processing required for the average joe to stitch together composites like that has only become mainstream in RECENT history.

The internet and the mass proliferation of computer technology and digital cameras has made this type of image much more likely.



how what you are saying explains this ?



If you really want to know what you're looking at there, you'll track down the person who took the original image and ask them what sort of processing was applied.

My "guess" (which could be wrong) is that you're looking at the galaxy's central bulge, which can be seen in this photograph quite clearly. Notice how the overall Milky Way is flat. But if you zoom the image in on that bulge, you're going to see the curvature of the very center.



Keep in mind, it's also possible that the image you posted is a sloppy composite of a less than great image.
edit on 24-8-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:36 PM
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Looking at that image a little more closely, my money is now on "cheap composite."



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: Greggers




I guess all this is possible because we are in a different location..im only guessing that we are located in a place where the arms are denser and tighter and our distance closer , the galactic centre as we see it now rises in a different way allowing such a capture :



also guess what..

before we were able to see only 1 arm now we can see more..how this can be explained...

if you notice now from Earth you can see an arm rising left to right and another right to left

left to right

right to left



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: Greggers
Looking at that image a little more closely, my money is now on "cheap composite."


well where is your money cause in Astronomy Stack Exchange they are referring to it like




I've seen a lot of beautiful pictures of the Milky Way from Earth such as this



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:58 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

why don't instead try to think for a moment without googling and point out what you remember about how we see the milky way form earth, and our solar system's position in the galaxy?

try to be honest as much as you can

i have a feeling you are one of the shifted , you are thousand of light years away from your original location and your only convincing yourself that what you are seeing now..that for sure is all new to you, is normal



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: SeaWorthy

Concerning Queen, as I know for a fact has been pointed out to you several times...



Finally watched this and now unsure what you mean? This ends of the world proving what? That it used to end that way.
edit on 24-8-2016 by SeaWorthy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 05:12 PM
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originally posted by: Pearj
Why don't you folks just make a thread to make fun of the Mandela Effect?

I certainly didn't make this thread for 30 pages of joking around.


Time for everyone to contribute and forget the kiddie behaviors.



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 05:36 PM
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I'm from the city. I've only seen the Milky Way with my naked eye one time. It was like a bright streak in the sky. Some people go their entire lives without ever seeing it.

I am, however, an amateur astronomer, so I am very familiar with the night sky (it's just that I can only view objects which are visible through the light pollution).

The reason the MW is curved in those pictures (and in particular the one you posted where you said it was like a rainbow) is a result of stitching composite images together.

What people on an internet forum are saying about that image is irrelevant. You can clearly see in the unfiltered images from the composite I provided you (the individual images are embedded in the blog post) that the milky way is straight. It is not curved. You can see this with your own eyes by looking at the individual photos.

I realize most of the people in this thread are dead serious about the ME, but you have me wondering. Why would you post that extreme curvature of the "rainbow" image and exclaim about how that arc was so bizarre to you, and then a few posts later claim that you'd already read about the composite effect.

When I suggested it was a fish-eye lens, why didn't you just say, "Well no, that's actually caused by a computer stitching composite images together and keeping the horizon flat, but what I'm saying is that in my reality it would not have been possible to create such an image."

It feels like you're cherry picking and obfuscating.

If it's not possible to take a picture like that from your previous timelline, please explain how you know this. If the milky way is flat in YOUR reality, a composite image with a flat horizon will look EXACTLY like the curved pictures you've posted.
edit on 24-8-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

i think its because of my english or what

In my timeline 'forming' a time lapse image of the milky way never resulted in a rainbow but only a slanting straight line

Im not putting into question the technique used to create a time lapse image of the milky way, is that the SAME technique in the other reality still produced a straight slanting line.

do you think for a second i didnt know how the rainbow image is formed ??? is that no matter how much you try ...no time lapse of the milky way was a frikking rainbow

are you with me now???



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: heineken
a reply to: Greggers

i think its because of my english or what

In my timeline 'forming' a time lapse image of the milky way never resulted in a rainbow but only a slanting straight line

Im not putting into question the technique used to create a time lapse image of the milky way, is that the SAME technique in the other reality still produced a straight slanting line.

do you think for a second i didnt know how the rainbow image is formed ??? is that no matter how much you try ...no time lapse of the milky way was a frikking rainbow

are you with me now???


If it produced a straight slanting line, then that would mean that the REAL milky way in your galaxy was extremely curved. In that case, you wouldn't have been amazed by the rainbow, as a rainbow is what it would have looked like before the days of composite images.



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

im guessing your wrong on this, i am thinking that our distance is different, if its closer or further, or we are completely looking at a different thing i don't know..

what i wish is im given the opportunity to get back and grab you the time lapse photos i'm used to see, but sadly i can't. And btw, i have to correct myself, i wish to go back and see them not because of you, to show or convince you , but more for me because i want so bad to see this as I used to, even if for one more time and thats it.

i started to be afraid that by time the memory of how for example the milky way looked from Earth will be replaced.



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

to form the rainbow image you must be able to take these puictures :









all these were not possible

were these possible for you?
edit on 24-8-2016 by heineken because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: Greggers

so you say you are an amateur astronomer and this is ok for u?

if its normal than ok, you have not moved

but hey im interested in the universe since childhood and no this aint right for me

and i don't know why, i have the gut feeling you are in reality questioning if this is what you are used to see
edit on 24-8-2016 by heineken because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-8-2016 by heineken because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2016 @ 06:59 PM
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Yes, those are all perfectly normal images. Notice the individual images are straight, which is what I thought you said you expected initially.




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