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First time building a computer

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posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: jonwhite866

Good for you! Dell, Alienware, and the rest really do charge high prices for subpar computers! It's really a great feeling when you build your own! And it's easy too but most people are intimidated, which is understandable! So to you, I say,



Looks like you're buying some pricy items for your new PC! Are you also a gamer, because with that machine you can really enjoy some PC gaming! I think your rig looks great but my only suggestion is the tower. I recommend Coolmaster towers and Amazon has them. They are just a great design, mostly in the cooling but more importantly the wiring deparment. When building your PC managing all the wirering can be tidious and frustrating. And most Coolmasters are much cheaper than the one you want to buy.

Other than that, I really don't have much else to offer. I like that you're maxing Win 10 64 bit with 32 gigs of ram because anyone who works with audio/video on the PC needs that ram. Your CPU, Intel, is perfect for graphic design and such. I'm an AMD guy but I'm a gamer and don't work with any of the above. My brother in law is a graphic designer and I build his PC's for him.

In any case, good luck and DON'T forget to ground yourself when handling your PC components. Static electricity is bad. Touch something metalic.

Btw, Amazon is great but another great site for PC shopping is, www.newegg.com...
edit on 15-8-2016 by Swills because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: Swills
a reply to: jonwhite866
In any case, good luck and DON'T forget to ground yourself when handling your PC components. Static electricity is bad.


Get one of these.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Swills

I've known a few who've bought into the Alienware brand and have walked away disappointed. I think £1,500 was the cost of one that performed no better than a console, haha. I do game but my main use will be film and video production. 3D work, simulations, visuals, editing 4-6k footage, etc. All stuff that requires a ridiculous amount of power to pull off, not just well, but in an efficient time frame.

I've seen a few people mention getting 2 GPUs but I'm not so sure if it's worth doing that straight away or at all. I'll take a look at that case though. Making sure everything fits in nicely is one of my main concerns, thanks!



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: trollz

May as well because they're only a few bucks. When I ordered mine, along with my PC parts, it took months to get here. Needless to say, I didn't get to use it when I built my PC. So when you don't have one, touch something metal.

I also forgot,

Do not build your PC in a carpeted room! Go in the kitchen!




posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: trollz

Ooh this is new to me, I'm guessing without it I'd get pissed off a lot?



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:32 PM
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a reply to: jonwhite866

I bought one years ago when I had money to waste. Basically, I overpaid for a really big tower. Never again will I buy from them. Well, maybe a laptop, unless I start building those too.

No need for 2 graphics cards. I see you gonna water cool your CPU, do you plan on over clocking it? Do you plan on overclocking your GPU? Typically, motherboards come with drivers and programs (yours comes with Win 8 64 bit) and on those CDs you should find your overclocking software. If, for some odd reason, it didn't come with such software than there's plenty of free ones online. But do some reading into what overclocking is and how to appropriately do it, specifically how to do it for your CPU and GPU.
edit on 15-8-2016 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: jonwhite866




I've seen a few people mention getting 2 GPUs but I'm not so sure if it's worth doing that straight away or at all. I'll take a look at that case though. Making sure

I agree , stay away from SLI.
You've got the option to do it in the future but from what I see on tech forums it's more trouble than it's worth.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: Swills

It wasn't my plan to start with but I probably will end up overclocking the CPU to shorten the render times a bit.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:45 PM
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originally posted by: jonwhite866
a reply to: trollz

Ooh this is new to me, I'm guessing without it I'd get pissed off a lot?


Well the thing is, simply touching something like the GPU or CPU could actually completely ruin it due to tiny unnoticeable amounts of static electricity. The wrist strap keeps you grounded so that that doesn't happen. There's other ways to go about being safe while handling the parts, but a wrist strip is cheap, simple and effective. Is it absolutely necessary? No, but for like $5, there's no reason not to own one.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: jonwhite866
a reply to: AnotherUnknown

How much better is the 1080 over the 1070? I've heard it's at the top of the food chain but is that extra £150-£200 really worth it?


I think its supposed to be about 20% faster, but iv not tested it myself, and the case you picked is the same one i have, so make sure the PSU cables are long enough, mine were almost too shot.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Yeah, having 2 GPU's sounds great but in reality it's costly and most games don't support it and who wants to deal with screen tearing? Why anyone working with video software would use it is beyond me. One high powered GPU is all he needs.
edit on 15-8-2016 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: jonwhite866

Good, do it, but baby steps. Check out this Youtube channel for all your PC education.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:55 PM
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a reply to: AnotherUnknown

I'll do a bit of digging and see if it's worth getting then. I may just start with the 1070 and upgrade to something else later down the line when the prices drop. How long will they need to be?
edit on 15-8-2016 by jonwhite866 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: Swills

Thanks I'll take a look. Can't wait to play around, haha.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 04:58 PM
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a reply to: trollz

Yep just read up on it. That $5 could save me $1,000s!



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: jonwhite866
a reply to: AnotherUnknown

I'll do a bit of digging and see if it's worth getting then. I may just start with the 1070 and upgrade to something else later down the line when the prices drop. How long will they need to be?


I only had a problem with the ATX cable being too short, but if you dont mind it showing inside the case it will be plenty, I just tied mine down out of the way, my cable is 21.5 inches and it needed 2 or 3 inches inches to be long enough to hide in the back of the case.
edit on 15-8-2016 by AnotherUnknown because: forgot something



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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Looks good, building a PC is really fun but it does take a while the first time with all the cable management etc but when you click that button and start it up for the first time it feels awesome.

If you are considering switching the 980 then you should get the 1080 considering the price isn't that much higher than the 980 and the 1080 is faster and draws a lot less power.

The whole machine will barely reach the 500W (even less with a 1070/1080) usage at full load, you can safely get the 850W version and invest that extra 30$ towards a 1080 perhaps, even with the 850W you will have more than enough for OC and future upgrades, Unless you want to go 980 Ti SLI the 1000W is overkill in my opinion.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: Vamana

Screw it, I'll go 1080 that extra speed should help. I'm not going to go 980Ti SLI. It's just seems unnecessary and from what other's say, too much hassle for what I'll get any way. Maybe in the future but right now it's not needed. I've gone for a 1000W PSU.



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: jonwhite866

i suggest you use pcpartpicker.com... it will allow you to see lists of components that are compatible with the others you've selected, as well the lists display what is shown on many different sites like newegg and amazon etc... so you dont have to visit those sites individually.

it even runs its own compatibility checker on your build. really a great resource
edit on 15-8-2016 by NobodiesNormal because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2016 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: Swills
a reply to: trollz

May as well because they're only a few bucks. When I ordered mine, along with my PC parts, it took months to get here. Needless to say, I didn't get to use it when I built my PC. So when you don't have one, touch something metal.

I also forgot,

Do not build your PC in a carpeted room! Go in the kitchen!




Swills, why did it take so long for you to get your parts? That seems outrageous unless you live on a tropical paradise island, population 1.

And OP, while reading about your situation on other webpages, the best suggestion I read was to go to a video editing forum and ask this same question with your build specs. You'll get better opinions and people with experience doing exactly what you want answers for. Ideally, go to the forums for the specific editing program you use and ask there. No point in spending money on parts that will show little benefit for the money. It's better to allocate that money into other areas of your build.




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