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New study suggests early humans 250,000 years ago were more advanced than thought.

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posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

have you considered that maybe these skills were passed down from an earlier advanced civilisation that had been wiped out by some catastrophe .

imagine trying to start all over from scratch with only tools that you could make yourself , there are many stories about out of place artifacts that have been found that defy any logical explanation .




posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

It wasn't always achieved with a spear thrust. Actually often time the game is instantly killed with the spear launched from the atlatl. Videos of suburban preteens killing small game can easily be viewed on youtube. Not everything is a yes or a no in this world my friend.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:10 AM
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a reply to: Newt22

Your reply regarding what you believe to be Pre-Oneida weathered pyramids in the Northeast great plains intrigues me a great deal. I think it would be an excellent post that I would love to read. You've left me wanting to know more and actually see what you're talking about.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

I'm not surprised at all. It's gotten to the point that I've decided in most cases I'm gonna ignore what scientists and historians say about well science and history. I mean every few days I wake up to the title "Scientists were wrong" or "Historians got it wrong" or a mixture of the two. To me a scientific theory has become just that a theory, even when they claim to have proof or evidence for their theory I just shrug it off and say 'Of course mate'.

I'm gonna start treating it the same way people who believe the world is awesome, clouds are made of candy floss and unicorn deliver their mail (trust me there's an old lady who thinks our postman is a gnome from her garden. He is actually scared to put her post through the letter box lol) treat me - Nod politely, smile blankly and say 'Wow that's very interesting. Do you know I don't really care?' and walk away.

I'll stick to my beliefs on history and it is this - We have no blues clue what happened more than a couple hundred years ago and most of the "believed" history is just guess work on rough evidence that can be examined a dozen times and have a hundred different outcomes.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: Imhotepic


Videos of suburban preteens killing small game can easily be viewed on youtube.

I doubt kids were allowed along on hunting parties except to observe. Taking down large game involved a variety of methods, all of which were extremely dangerous.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:25 AM
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Dude doesn't have any shoes.

That would be the first thing, well second anyway, that I'd figure out. Might even catch on someday.

I don't understand why they are surprised the people were butchering animals 250k ya.

Anything over 2-300 lbs would be tough to be carrying back to camp whole and I doubt the camp would come to the kill.

Also, that hairy thong he's rocking would probably have to be scrapped and cured/processed to be worn, so they were used to using a lot of an animal.

And to accessorize the ensemble, some nice bead work.




Perforated marine gastropod shells at the western Asian site of Skhul and the North African site of Oued Djebbana indicate the early use of beads by modern humans in these regions. The remoteness of these sites from the seashore and a comparison of the shells to natural shell assemblages indicate deliberate selection and transport by humans for symbolic use. Elemental and chemical analyses of sediment matrix adhered to one Nassarius gibbosulus from Skhul indicate that the shell bead comes from a layer containing 10 human fossils and dating to 100,000 to 135,000 years ago, about 25,000 years earlier than previous evidence for personal decoration by modern humans in South Africa.


mathildasanthropologyblog.wordpress.com...

We already know Neanderthals buried their dead, right? Oldest known is 130,000 ya.

ooooooo, ok, 250k ya.

Well, was it gradual or did someone wake up one day with a great idea?

Glad they found some evidence, anyway.






posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck
Good point - but I mean older, deeper... and definitely bigger. Prof. Scott Wolter's I think is more correct then what is said... However, got to go to work so I will look later... Got to try to pin the Hopewell Age to Oneida time-line so I can visualize it....



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:37 AM
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In my opinion, these 'ancients' were smarter and craftier than we want to give them credit for. Tactics like herding animals into canyons and gullies would make them easy game for concealed waiting hunters with spears. The ability and intelligence to outsmart the quarry would be a very 'human' trait which reminds me of the natives in Canada who'd stampede a herd of buffalo in the migration season toward a cliff and simply take the victims that went over the edge - easy pickings and no spears required, just brains, talent and co-operation. They were smart enough to know when the herds would be passing through based on years of observation.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: Flavian

Boats were towed by gangs of men and sometimes women and children on rivers and canals here. It was only later that horses were used. Alongside a canal near here small brick buildings were built for the itinerant gangs to sleep in. These buildings had a very efficient fireplace at one end and a tiled floor. I assume the gangs slept on a layer of straw or straw mattresses.

When one of these buildings was being renovated two needle cases were found. One could have been dropped, it was in a crack in the floor. The other had been deliberately hidden in the wall. Neither contained a needle. The cases were simple short sections of small hollow rib bone, the curve just enough for a needle of about two and a half inches to wedge into place. Marks showed where the bone had been used to force a needle through thick cloth.

The gangs are said to have had ragged clothing from pushing through the undergrowth on the canal and riverbanks. Hauling the rope wore their clothing. A needle must have been absolutely essential to life. Whatever the story is behind the hidden needle case I feel it hints at how valuable and essential a needle was for these boat haulers. These needle cases were the only objects from that era found during the renovation.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

As research methods and technology improves history keeps getting rewritten.

I too don't believe that ancient man were a bunch of chest thumping bone heads. I have collaborated evidence from a number of books and it appears that there could've been a sea trading route in the stone age between what is now Spain and Britain and Britain and Scandinavia and that could explain some discoveries of OOPA's (out of place artifacts.)

We don't give the so called cavemen enough credit. After all Da Vinci had blueprints for tanks and choppers hundreds of years ago, who's to say that the caveman didn't have their own neolithic Da Vincis?



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:52 AM
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originally posted by: Dwoodward85
a reply to: SLAYER69
I'll stick to my beliefs on history and it is this - We have no blues clue what happened more than a couple hundred years ago and most of the "believed" history is just guess work on rough evidence that can be examined a dozen times and have a hundred different outcomes.

On the other hand, you could audit an archaeology course or take a serious walk through a museum accompanied by educated staff, and then you'd be able to come to your opinions based upon what you do know...rather than what you don't.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: Kester

The palliasse is a very old mattress consisting of a crude bag made of fibre like string (eg a hessian bag) stuffed with dry straw and very effective too. I spent many comfortable nights sleeping on one of these in my early military days and it's more comfortable than what you might think for something that's 1000s of years old in design.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck

I've done the tours. That's kind of what I meant look at the evidence for yourself (myself) and make my own mind up instead of just believing what I'm told.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69
Yet.

Supposedly...

We just blossomed about 10,000 BCE, into agriculture, math, writing, etc etc etc.


Yes, that's the view of non-anthropologists and non-archaeologists.


But!

We stayed primitive far longer than previously thought. I mean, were more 'Advanced' earlier than previously thought. Then we blossomed 240,000 + or - years later. I guess it's a matter of perspective?


Yes. Again, that' s the view of people who aren't scientists working in this field.

Trust me - humans weren't wandering around, "naked and afraid" before 10,000 BCE and then suddenly fell into agriculture and all that. They were making jewelry, painting, making musical instruments, making spears, cooperatively hunting large and small animals, rudimentary farms, early domestication of animals (including dogs), tanning hides, weaving, etc,etc long before 10,000 BCE.

Honestly, unless you were going to conferences or avidly reading the journals, you wouldn't know about this stuff. Most people don't really care to slog through Soffer, Olga. "Recovering Perishable Technologies through Use Wear on Tools: Preliminary Evidence for Upper Paleolithic Weaving and Net Making 1." Current Anthropology 45.3 (2004): 407-413.- which talks about fiber technology 25,000 years BCE.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
That could be a politician posing for a photo shoot.

Why is his skin coloring so light. Hardly likely especially considering the location of the dig.

I mean, Jesus is one thing, always pale. But our ancestors back this far, hardly likely in this part of the world


Oh yeah! You hit on one of my major gripes with these illustrations - that and the "let's make him PRIMITIVE by giving him some of the attributes of CHIMPANZEES (brow ridge, heavy jaw, body hair)."

GRRRRrrrrr.

And his spear shaft isn't straight, either.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Can you honestly not imagine the uproar and tears from the decently sensitive amongst us today were he not wearing a loin cloth? As for pale skin so what if he liked to spend his time in the shade - plenty do as I can contest even today having just come back from the beach and seen people parked in all sorts of shade rather than in the sun.

I have tried to paste from f one of several articles from various science magazines the view that around 12.500 years ago a comet hit America and wiped out the Clovis people and importantly a lot of very large and dangerous animals our ancestors had to live side-byside with. When you consider cave bears standing 12 " tall with huge claws and teeth and then sabre toothed tigers and their animal weaponry our ancestors were far from dumb and just climbing out the fog they were damn clever and lived in a world, most today would'[t survive regardless of our intelligence and abilities. In fact one wonders if we could have adapted as they did to their world. Bone marks made by knives show many dangerous animals were eaten by people back then so they were not the simpletons it has been fashionable to inform people they were. Just the idea that they survived should be a hint.

I think its scientists and their juvenile findings they come out with regardless of common sense or practicality that let us down because homo sapiens with his brain and curiosity certainly didn't bother sitting in his cave all his life.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Shiloh7
a reply to: pheonix358
When you consider cave bears standing 12 " tall with huge claws and teeth


I obviously know what you mean, but I just had to say that the image of a 12 inch angry bear is hilarious!



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

Man, you are frigging smart, do you happen to have any info in your skull, about the mutation that enabled our ancestors brain to get bigger as the jaw muscles got smaller, i like to think, that it was a spontaneous mutation, and it did not take that long..

Also, what in the world is happening to our jaw? will it eventually disappear, leaving only a tiny hole?



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

Yeah, I was being a bit overly sarcastic.

"Civilization" though, came much later eh?

Advanced cultures that went nowhere were numerous?




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