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Scientists discover that Greenland Sharks can live to be more than 400 years old

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posted on Aug, 11 2016 @ 10:34 PM
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We tend to think of vertebrates as living about as long as we do, give or take 50 to 100 years. Marine species are likely to be very long-lived, but determining their age is particularly difficult. Nielsen et al. used the pulse of carbon-14 produced by nuclear tests in the 1950s—specifically, its incorporation into the eye during development—to determine the age of Greenland sharks. This species is large yet slow-growing. The oldest of the animals that they sampled had lived for nearly 400 years, and they conclude that the species reaches maturity at about 150 years of age.




ABSTRACT
The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), an iconic species of the Arctic Seas, grows slowly and reaches >500 centimeters (cm) in total length, suggesting a life span well beyond those of other vertebrates. Radiocarbon dating of eye lens nuclei from 28 female Greenland sharks (81 to 502 cm in total length) revealed a life span of at least 272 years. Only the smallest sharks (220 cm or less) showed signs of the radiocarbon bomb pulse, a time marker of the early 1960s. The age ranges of prebomb sharks (reported as midpoint and extent of the 95.4% probability range) revealed the age at sexual maturity to be at least 156 ± 22 years, and the largest animal (502 cm) to be 392 ± 120 years old. Our results show that the Greenland shark is the longest-lived vertebrate known, and they raise concerns about species conservation.

SOURCE
edit on 11-8-2016 by logicsoda because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 11 2016 @ 10:37 PM
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I saw a brief article about this somewhere earlier, and I think it's incredible. 400 years is a very long time.

S&F
edit on 8/11/2016 by AdmireTheDistance because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2016 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: logicsoda

That is actually very exciting. I had no idea anything lived that long.



posted on Aug, 11 2016 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
a reply to: logicsoda

That is actually very exciting. I had no idea anything lived that long.

Nor did I. Research into the genes responsible for aging in these sharks could possibly have some amazing implications for humans in terms of aging. I think it'll be interesting to see the research that is conducted as a result of this finding.
edit on 11-8-2016 by logicsoda because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-8-2016 by logicsoda because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2016 @ 10:46 PM
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sharks are indeed fascinating
thats quite remarkable.

maybe this will lead to more empirical data as to how sharks are also immune to cancer amongst other ailments which otherwise cripples any other species.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 03:05 AM
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Wow, pretty crazy when you think about it, that shark would have been born in 1616, a few yrs before the Mayflower landed in America. No doubt that it's seen a thing or two over the years.



posted on Aug, 12 2016 @ 05:31 AM
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Thanks you OP, its nice to read some good news before work for once.

That really is insane 400 years. I honestly thought lobsters where the longest living sea animal. I believe I remember reading that lobsters can technology live forever if the dont get ate or get a disease. The problem is telling exactly how old they are I know one has been somehow proven to be in the 120 year old range. And another one that was 3-4 times that ones weight possibly 2000 years old!!

I suggest you check it out. I would post some links, maybe I will later but I have to head to work.

Thank you agian that was a very nice post. S+F from me. It's so refreshing to read something non-political, doom porn.




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