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Is it possible to see yourself objectively?

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posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 03:26 AM
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Reason and logic can be used to objectify your views and remove/lessen subjectivity. At a certain level of awareness/understanding information is translated into meta ideas that can be used like building blocks where you can analyze the parts and see if the ideas are the same or deviation. Some call this view transformation the ego death.

The golden rule is a very precise idea but many religions are making deviations from the golden rule and people are believing the deviations since they are blind to analyzing and measuring the meta ideas. Some of it is self deceit since if another soul show with reason why the ideas are not the same they will not listen. Emotion to the group/idea being right are more important than facts, logic and reason. No reflection about the self or the group thinking.

Energetic body states can help with raising clarity of the conscious mind as well as allow secrets from the unconscious mind to slip thru.
edit on 9-8-2016 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun



Who determines the objectives?


Reason and logic determines if you are objective or not. The meta ideas speak for themselves for those that have the analyzing skill to see the difference between 2 ideas.



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 06:32 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Complete objectivity is, as you state, impossible.

I do believe I have achieved about 80-90% accuracy from my many years spent undergoing intense introspection. There are, of course, certain things that remain a mystery, but for the most part I am aware of my strengths, my weaknesses, my character flaws, emotional triggers and general mental functioning.

I have reached a point in my life where I feel like I am a passive observer of reality and am just going along with the ride for the sake of it.

I know how it all plays out. You know how it all plays out. We all do. But most people pretend that they don't because they want the feeling of thrill and excitement to mask the truth.



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

I don't know if it's possible, but I'm pretty honest about myself and knowing both my strengths and my faults/weaknesses--at least, that's what my wife tells me.

I think that all it really takes is being both observant about your own actions (including feelings) and then being honest with yourself about them. It's not really all that difficult.

Of course, I'm not claiming that I'm absolutely objective about myself, but looking at it philosophically, if the point of discussion is one's self, isn't that person being both subjective and objective at the same time?



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 08:45 AM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: Profusion

I don't know if it's possible, but I'm pretty honest about myself and knowing both my strengths and my faults/weaknesses--at least, that's what my wife tells me.

I think that all it really takes is being both observant about your own actions (including feelings) and then being honest with yourself about them. It's not really all that difficult.

Of course, I'm not claiming that I'm absolutely objective about myself, but looking at it philosophically, if the point of discussion is one's self, isn't that person being both subjective and objective at the same time?



Perhaps try thinking of it this way. Accepting all that you are, and what actions you will take in life. I've personally come to accept the fact that I'm everything. From a killer to a creator, and can from actiom, and experience relate to everything. Once you figure that out, then the opinions, validations amongst family/friends/strangers, humans, non humans becomes irrelevant as you know in your being that you can try to be whatever you desire, and you know every energies thought or being.



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: Bankaikiller

Oh, trust me--the opinion others hold of who I am (well, who they think I am) became irrelevant to me a long time ago (and I'm "only" 37).



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: Bankaikiller

Oh, trust me--the opinion others hold of who I am (well, who they think I am) became irrelevant to me a long time ago (and I'm "only" 37).



You are fortunate in that regard! I'm 26 years old, and I still have much attachments to the people out there, in terms of validation, granted that's really only when it comes to trying to get a job with one of the universes best medicine (marijuana) still abundant in my system



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 09:42 AM
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It's all about perspective, in my opinion. People look at me and think I am aloof, stuck up, pissy, etc, when in reality I am an extreme introvert who is usually thinking about 1000 things at the same time (and apparently resting bitch face). I recently had a customer mention to my boss that I was in a rush. The reality of it was, I had a really sore tailbone from driving 12 hours, had mosquito bites, and was fidgety. Since I knew what was going on, I assumed there was no signal being given to the customer. I called the customer immediately and apologized for my appearance. Since that incident, I have tried to be aware of my posture, my expressions, my mannerisms, and have caught myself untold times appearing disinterested, cocky, restless, intimidating, and even mocking (my eyes like to roll back on their own). Making a conscious effort to change something I wasn't even aware of, was and still is difficult.

I still don't see myself objectively, but perhaps a bit closer to how others see me.



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: Bankaikiller

Meh...I used to be the biggest pothead I knew, and I was still able to quit when it came time to getting a job.

Actually, at one point, my dad had me drug tested, and the doctor said it was the highest concentration of THC he'd seen in a sample. I wore that as a badge of honor back then--now it just makes me lament my misspent youth. But I'm happy with where I've ended up thus far, so it all works out in the end, I guess.



posted on Aug, 9 2016 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: Bankaikiller

Meh...I used to be the biggest pothead I knew, and I was still able to quit when it came time to getting a job.

Actually, at one point, my dad had me drug tested, and the doctor said it was the highest concentration of THC he'd seen in a sample. I wore that as a badge of honor back then--now it just makes me lament my misspent youth. But I'm happy with where I've ended up thus far, so it all works out in the end, I guess.



It really doess! Also, at least in my experience of working jobs for the past 10 years it's a 50/50 on whether corporations allow you work based on that or not. Some company policies are strict, others are not, and some just flat out don't care. All positions ranging from fast food, retail, and acounting. Def not high level gov jobs unless you really know people. Atlas it's who you know that gets you in



posted on Aug, 10 2016 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: Profusion

Subjective creatures can't do objectivity well.




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