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Is This The Real Palace Of King Arthur ?

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posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Then, you and I are not alone in that. The prudent member here at ATS knows when to respond, and when for the sake of maintaining civility of discussion...not to.




posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

The first time you realise the ones you thought were civilised, logical persons, with a humanitarian agenda.. Are instead complete psychos that needs a reality check..

I learned to say instead;" Yes you are right, but
I believe in this.. And I think it makes me a better human.. Does it make you a better human? " and it usually just crashes the debate or discussion.. The story is about if you can find Arthur's sword, it means you are hopefully a righteous person..



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:11 PM
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So how many "real" camelots are we up to now?



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

Swords in lakes is a traditional theme. Tourists may find something.


Many centuries ago, Cameron of Lochiel and the Earl of Atholl had a dispute regarding the boundaries of their respective lands and so arranged to meet at this, as yet unnamed, loch to settle the controversy. Beforehand, it was mutually agreed that each should be accompanied by one man only. Lochiel set out from Achnacarry, but had not travelled far when he was met by the Witch of Moy who warned that treachery was afoot. He knew to take heed of the witch and at her suggestion took more men with him. As it transpired Atholl did, in fact, have many men with him and seeing he was outnumbered relented; a deal on the boundaries was struck without bloodshed. As custom dictated, a sword was thrown into the loch to ratify the agreement. From that day on the loch was named Loch a' Chlaidheimh - loch of the sword in English. A glance at the map will confirm that the current boundary, between Tayside and Highland regions, runs straight through the middle of the loch!

For centuries the sword remained there, until in 1812, it was found in an odd manner. Back in those days there were shielings on the moor, where the highlanders, usually the women and children, would take their livestock in summer, both to exploit the fresh grazing in the upper glens and to free up the land at home for the cultivation of crops. One summer's day, when children were paddling in the loch, a girl cut her foot on some sharp object. A search was made and the old claymore, rusty and peat-stained, was found. It was taken to Fort William, but when the leading men of the town heard what had happened they decided the claymore must be returned to the loch immediately. It was therefore carried back with fitting ceremony and thrown far out over the waters. There it remains to this day.
www.wildfisher.co.uk...




posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: JDeLattre89

I counted 14



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Can you list them?



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Thats why I choose my battles. Let the others fight it out. Truth is like beauty...in the eyes of the beholder.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: JDeLattre89

Dont know, but HELL! We just need to prove even 1 POSSIBLY existed. Good luck with that.

Hey, my aunt in Forida has a large round table. Will that work to prove Camelot? See? Dont think we will ever be able to separate fact from fiction.

The place, the man, the myth, the legend.....



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Yes, but i wont..



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger


Truth is like beauty...in the eyes of the beholder.


I dont know if i agree.. But its amazing in a way, and terrible in another..



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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Even if the legends of "King" Arthur were based on a real person, its highly unlikely he would have lived in Cornwall .... about as far removed from those whom he supposedly fought as its possible to get. But an interesting excavation of a dark age site nonetheless.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

You're welcome. I've also been to Austria and Bavaria. My moms German, grew up in the Forrester house less than a mile from the castle in Coburg.

That whole region is magical, centuries of history.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: intrptr





The castle in Coburg. The ruins in the OP can't hold a candle to this


And these British Castles make Coburg look naff.











posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Those are stunning. Ruins though. Internal structures burned out by fire, all thats left is the outer stone shell. Unlike the castle in Coburg that was never taken or defeated.

Its internal structure and artifacts are still intact. Thats the beauty of that castle, its furnishings, living spaces, and defensive arms, all intact for viewing.

Last reply, off topic.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: alldaylong

Those are stunning. Ruins though. Internal structures burned out by fire, all thats left is the outer stone shell. Unlike the castle in Coburg that was never taken or defeated.

Its internal structure and artifacts are still intact. Thats the beauty of that castle, its furnishings, living spaces, and defensive arms, all intact for viewing.

Last reply, off topic.


Many of Britains Castles are not ruins. The Middle picture i posted was Leeds Castle in Kent.

This is the interior



Another example is Warwick Castle.

Exterior



Interior




posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Dumnonia?

As in "Dumb on ya'"?

Any smart alek could be the King of Dumnonia.

Then again, it could be "Dumnonia' as in Pneumonia. So, its a kingdom where people were so stupid when they died by stupid means, like walking off a cliff, they said, "Oh, yea, ole Cousin Alpert died of Dumnonia."

It fits really, Arthur, Knights of the Round Table..............so, who sat at the head of the table? Oh, yea, its round! There's no head of the table to a round table.

There's a Monty Python skit in all of this.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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King Arthur was a real but had nothing to do with Glastonbury or Tintagel. There were actually two Arthur's

King Arthur I, who lived from 355AD to 388AD fought the Romans, son of Magnus Maximus, who himself was son of Constantine the Great. The second King Arthur was born in 503AD and died in 579AD, famed for fighting the Saxons, son of King Maurice, who himself was the son of King Theoderic.

The facts no sword was ever pulled from a stone and Merlin wasn't a wizard, but instead King Arthur II's mentor and teacher. Both King's I and II were directly related to each other, both in a long line of Kings reaching back to the first King of Britain, King Brutus.

Written in the Coelbren language of the ancient British, (there was no Wales then ) It is generally accepted that ancient British history is the most well recorded and chronicled history in the world. It would appear that throughout history the tales and deeds of both King Arthurs, first recounted by historian Geoffrey of Monmouth, had been rolled into one. But after extensive research they have been separated. Arthur I is buried in Staffordshire and Arthur II is buried in South Wales.

There is substantial evidence that there were actually two King Arthurs recorded from a variety of sources, on papyrus, manuscript, in stone, engraved in copper and chronicled in accounts from contemporaries in Ireland, France and other parts of Europe. You just have to do the research.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: Flavian
a reply to: DISRAELI

King Mark of Kernow. As you stated, this was a palace from the early stories rather than the home of Camelot. Did not Kernow supposedly fight for Arthur though?

I always favoured Camelot in a more inaccessible location, such as the Welsh valleys or even further North (Lancashire and Cumbria also have claims). This would fit with early Britain being more "North centric" than the next 1500 years of our history.

Unfortunately though, until we find Excalibur, Camelot or the Lady in the Lake i fear this will remain as nothing but interesting (rather than a factual story of Arthur).




Tuscany's Excalibur is the real thing, say scientists



The sword of St Galgano, said to have been plunged into a rock by a medieval Tuscan knight, has been authenticated, bolstering Italy's version of the Excalibur legend.
Galgano Guidotti, a noble from Chiusdano, near Siena, allegedly split the stone with his sword in 1180 after renouncing war to become a hermit. For centuries the sword was assumed to be a fake. but research revealed last week has dated its metal to the twelfth century.

Only the hilt, wooden grip and a few inches of the 3ft blade poke from the hill, which still draws pilgrims and tourists to the ruins of the chapel built around it.

www.theguardian.com...



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Yah okay, my bad. English castles are waaay better than other castles.



posted on Aug, 5 2016 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Why not? A simple list to back your claim?



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