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My loyal 4-wheeled companion has died

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posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:03 AM
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I have been the fairly satisfied owner of a 2003 Volkswagen Jetta for the last 3 years. Until this past Wednesday. As I was travelling down a street about a mile from my house, which was my destination, a large delivery truck pulled out in front of me. It had just stopped raining, and the streets were slick. So, even though I was actually driving under the posted speed limit, distance and road friction were not on my side. I collided with the rear driver side wheels of the delivery truck, and my poor Schwartz (it was a black VW, so I named it Schwartz) performed to design specifications and thoroughly crumpled to protect it's loving owner. I was very fond of my quirky little car, but I can say no less than it died and honorable death.

So, that being said, I would very much argue the point that you are safer in an older 'more solid' car. I recall plenty of people complaining about the required impact ratings and energy absorption when the US Federal Government started creating and enforcing these regulations in the latter quarter or so of last century. But this is the second time the designed weak points in vehicle construction has saved me from grave injury or death. Yes, I am injured, but not nearly as severe as I would have been if this accident had happened in the first car I owned. It was a rock solid 1979 Lincoln Towncar. I shudder to think of that outcome.




posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

The benefit of an older car is that it will go THROUGH whatever it hits, rather than stopping at all. That is, unless what you hit is a ruddy great big truck. I am glad that you made it, and sad that your car did not. I hope the insurance will cover some of the cost of replacement of your horseless chariot. Tis a boon that no horses were required in order to operate it, otherwise you might have lost between two and six good friends in that collision, rather than one!

Rest in peace Schwartz.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:25 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

May the Schwartz be with him....always



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

I doubt that it would have gone through the International truck I collided with. I'm actually thinking that I was rather lucky to have hit the wheel, because anywhere forward of that seems like it would have risked my vehicle running under the frame of the truck and possibly decapitating the vehicle and possibly myself. But my old Lincoln (which was black with black velour interior, and named Mojo) didn't have airbags, and my face would probably be shattered right now.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:28 AM
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Thank you both. I'm sure my dear car-child is running up and down the Autobahn in car heaven right now.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 03:20 AM
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I remember a story a guy I was working with in Europe told me. His father was a fireman in Northern Ireland during the bad times (late 60s -70s i think). They had one of the last Dennis fire engines with a RR B80 engine.His father had told him that they fought had to keep the old girl as they love the fire engine. One day they were an a call in the contry side when the fire engine hit a land mine ment to distroy a Saracen APC, the fire engine was blown into the air and into a field but the whole crew survived. My work mate told he still remembers his father telling him "she paid back all the love we give her that day". Some times just sometimes new is not better



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 03:43 AM
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a reply to: imod02

Well, when you bring variables like land mines into the equation, I would have to agree with you 100%. Like the Rolls-Royce engines in the WW2 Era (might be wrong on the bird) B-52 Bombers. There are plenty of documented cases of the plane landing with bullet holes through the cylinders and even pistons of the engines, and absolutely all the oil having leaked out, and they were still running until the pilot shut them off. Heavy design and intentional over-engineering are purposeful elements of equipment like that. And also the prevailing theory of Soviet military equipment fabrication for the lmajority of last century. The stronger it's initially made, the smaller the chance of failure and the less the maintenance costs. In theory.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 04:14 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

It might be the Merlin engine Rolls Royce produced that you are on about, it was used in the most British planes including the Lancaster bomber and spitfire... Adopted later in US planes. The B-52 was a later plane, came into service early 50's. The flying fortress B-29 saw a lot of action, though their engines had a few issues shuch as a tendency to catch fire early on.

RIP Schwartz, you may have lost a car but it did do exactly as it should taking a considerable amount of luck out of survivability. Have a speedy recovery and good luck finding another loyal stallion



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 04:21 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

I guess we can call it a time of mixed blessings.

The car saved your bones, or your life, and left you with the memories of all the times you spent together.




So, that being said, I would very much argue the point that you are safer in an older 'more solid' car.


Not so much in crashes at higher speeds. The greater mass generates more inertia and kinetic energy to lead to more serious injuries. Modern designs have less mass, better brakes, airbags and the crumple zones to make us safer than ever.

I saw something similar to the Lincoln Towncar a few weeks ago. It was baby blue with white panels down the sides and looked like a frickin aircraft carrier as it bounced down the road towards me. The UK never went the way of the monster US cars; we drifted more to the European style of smaller, nippier cars. Seeing a classic, huge American car on our smaller roads is slightly jaw-dropping. It had skinny wheels and the body seemed to be almost a foot wider over the arches.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Thank you. I do believe that my next vehicle will be a Dodge Charger R/T. I want something with a little muscle, but also with 4 doors. Got family to consider.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 04:54 AM
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That sucks.

I'm glad that you are okay though.

There is a video floating out there somewhere that shows a modern car colliding with an early sixties finned boat. The boat didn't come out too well.

I once had a 1970 Fleetwood Limo, named Obsidian. By far my favorite car I have ever owned.

I was doing about 35 mph when a Chevy s10 ran a stop sign. I hit him in the front driver quarter and spun him six times. Every side of that pickup contacted my beautiful limo.

Had I been doing 50, I would have obliterated the little truck.

Safety features do have their points, but I'm still going to complain about them. I am also still going to complain about the fact that nothing manufactured for the common folk has personality.

That's why I'm still driving a 71 Torino. I will be very surprised to see any 48 year old 2016 vehicles running around when I'm an old old man.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 04:55 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

My point exactly. Engineered crumple zones are a fantastic achievement.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 05:01 AM
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a reply to: Bobaganoosh

There are maybe a couple of modern vehicles that could become classics. But not ones most people have driven, or maybe even heard of. They'd all fall into the ultra-luxury or ultra-sport categories. Like the Devl 16 or Koenigsegg, simply because they are such a high-end and small quantity product. Or perhaps the highest-end Maybachs, Rolls or Bentleys.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 05:08 AM
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a reply to: pfishy



There you go.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: Bobaganoosh

I am not going to tell you how many times I just looped that video, but suffice it to say that it was enough to concern most people. Slow motion crash tests are a guilty pleasure of sorts for me. And it also clearly demonstrated why I stand by modern safety engineering. The front and rear are actually stiffer overall than older cars, but the frame and subframe are designed to bend, fold and crumple to absorb the energy of the crash, while a much sturdier cabin frame directs even more energy around and away from the driver and occupants.

Schwartz, old buddy, I told your family that you died well. I'll see you in Valhalla.


Interesting side note. The front bumper, radiator, hood and grill were completely demolished. But the VW symbol somehow broke free and landed in a driveway across the street without a scratch on it.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 07:27 AM
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I would very much argue the point that you are safer in an older 'more solid' car.


While I do appreciate the technology [ that came from F1 racing ] and the "crumple zones", I still like my old truck. I have an 8 cyl '96 Ram 1500 extended cab with steel chrome bumpers and several people have bumped them in parking lots or while they're trying to parallel park. Every time, they jump out, ready to apologize for a dent or scratch and the look on their faces is always amusing. Their plastic bumper is scratched/dented, mine has a tiny smudge on the chrome, that I can just wipe off.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: pfishy

A million three hundred thousand people die in automobile accidents worldwide per year. You are fortunate.

I have been in a few wrecks in my life. Even creamed by a drunk driver once and sent to the hospital. Every time I revisit the vehicle in the scrapyard afterwards and give thanks for her giving her life so I can live on. Seriously.

Be careful with the sporty cars. They are more careless with your life than your domesticated Schwartz. I should know.

My car in my avatar, I drive defensively and carefully, fully respecting what it can do.
edit on 30-7-2016 by smirkley because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 05:11 PM
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it`s great that they are making safer cars but for the price you have to pay for a new car you kind wish they weren`t made to be disposable after just one accident.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: Tardacus

I'd have to agree.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: smirkley

I actually have already.



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