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Man Jailed After He Says Cops Mistook Krispy Kreme Glaze For Meth

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posted on Aug, 1 2016 @ 07:45 AM
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originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes
I understand that position, but I don't agree with it. The drug is illegal, and thus possession is a crime. I'd like to see all arrested involved with that. That is THE main substance involved in my losing a sibling, as in, he's dead. Had he been in jail for possession, he might have lived. As it is, a completely innocent person was involved in his death, and has to live with that. That's not right.


So you think arresting him for possession would have helped him survive this drug? You do know that users do drugs in prison too right?


No, drug arrests are not the reason the system is messed up. Corruption is one reason, and false arrest, as is likely in this case, is another reason. the occasional bad cop is a reason. The flawed court system is a reason. Illegal drugs are not a reason! They should be illegal. Drug users cause harm to society as a whole, not just to themselves, and thus there is good reason for those drugs to be illegal.


Actually yes, drug arrests for possession make up FAR too much of the incarceration in this country. Please explain how drug users harm society. Let's start with the two most commonly used drugs in the country. Alcohol and tobacco.

Seriously, you sound so closed minded to this idea. You should really look up Portugal and see how decriminalization changed their country. It spits in the face of your, "all drug users are evil bastards" narrative. We need to stop punishing people for using and help them. Punishing for using just exacerbates the issue. How can you not see that?


Now, that said, I don't agree with the property seizure laws, that don't even require someone to be charged, because that's flat wrong. Once someone is charged and convicted, that's another story.


Civil asset forfeiture laws are the worst.




posted on Aug, 1 2016 @ 07:48 AM
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originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I didn't say legalize drugs. I said to stop jailing people for possession. Which means decriminalization. Not legalization. Please learn the difference.


If something is illegal, then there needs to be a punishment for it. Drug users tend to be broke, and cannot pay fines. So, if they can't pay a fine, and can't be jailed, what, then? Scold them, and say not to do it again, and send them on their way?

You should jail the sellers and rehabilitate the users. That's common sense. Come on!



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 02:20 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes
I understand that position, but I don't agree with it. The drug is illegal, and thus possession is a crime. I'd like to see all arrested involved with that. That is THE main substance involved in my losing a sibling, as in, he's dead. Had he been in jail for possession, he might have lived. As it is, a completely innocent person was involved in his death, and has to live with that. That's not right.


So you think arresting him for possession would have helped him survive this drug? You do know that users do drugs in prison too right?


In this case, yes. He stepped in front of a car, bombed to the point of not noticing.


originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

No, drug arrests are not the reason the system is messed up. Corruption is one reason, and false arrest, as is likely in this case, is another reason. the occasional bad cop is a reason. The flawed court system is a reason. Illegal drugs are not a reason! They should be illegal. Drug users cause harm to society as a whole, not just to themselves, and thus there is good reason for those drugs to be illegal.


Actually yes, drug arrests for possession make up FAR too much of the incarceration in this country. Please explain how drug users harm society. Let's start with the two most commonly used drugs in the country. Alcohol and tobacco.

Seriously, you sound so closed minded to this idea. You should really look up Portugal and see how decriminalization changed their country. It spits in the face of your, "all drug users are evil bastards" narrative. We need to stop punishing people for using and help them. Punishing for using just exacerbates the issue. How can you not see that?


I have already stated my position on tobacco. As for alcohol, no, it isn't a "drug".

If someone doesn't want to be arrested for drugs, there is a simple solution - don't be around them. I know what it did for the Netherlands, and what a cesspool Amsterdam is. Been there, seen it first hand.


originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

Now, that said, I don't agree with the property seizure laws, that don't even require someone to be charged, because that's flat wrong. Once someone is charged and convicted, that's another story.


Civil asset forfeiture laws are the worst.


There, we agree completely!!



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 02:21 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I didn't say legalize drugs. I said to stop jailing people for possession. Which means decriminalization. Not legalization. Please learn the difference.


If something is illegal, then there needs to be a punishment for it. Drug users tend to be broke, and cannot pay fines. So, if they can't pay a fine, and can't be jailed, what, then? Scold them, and say not to do it again, and send them on their way?

You should jail the sellers and rehabilitate the users. That's common sense. Come on!


That's not a bad plan, in some cases. An arrest, and a fine, works, with a requirement built in for rehabilitation. I am not saying have a long jail sentence, but no arrest at all?



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Do you even read the articles you link before going off on some tantrum?

10 hours.

10 hours does not equal 10 days.

It's not close.

I'll help you out. 10 hours isn't even close to one full day.



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 06:57 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

*Siiiiiiigh...*
Why hardly anyone dies from a drug overdose in Portugal


Portugal decriminalized the use of all drugs in 2001. Weed, coc aine, heroin, you name it -- Portugal decided to treat possession and use of small quantities of these drugs as a public health issue, not a criminal one. The drugs were still illegal, of course. But now getting caught with them meant a small fine and maybe a referral to a treatment program -- not jail time and a criminal record.

Whenever we debate similar measures in the U.S. -- marijuana decriminalization, for instance -- many drug-policy makers predict dire consequences. “If you make any attractive commodity available at lower cost, you will have more users," former Office of National Drug Control Policy deputy director Thomas McLellan once said of Portugal's policies. Joseph Califano, founder of the Center for Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, once warned that decriminalization would "increase illegal drug availability and use among our children."

But in Portugal, the numbers paint a different story. The prevalence of past-year and past-month drug use among young adults has fallen since 2001, according to statistics compiled by the Transform Drug Policy Foundation, which advocates on behalf of ending the war on drugs. Overall adult use is down slightly too. And new HIV cases among drug users are way down.

Now, numbers just released from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction paint an even more vivid picture of life under decriminalization: drug overdose deaths in Portugal are the second-lowest in the European Union.


Come on. Deny some ignorance for a change in your life.



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 06:57 AM
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originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I didn't say legalize drugs. I said to stop jailing people for possession. Which means decriminalization. Not legalization. Please learn the difference.


If something is illegal, then there needs to be a punishment for it. Drug users tend to be broke, and cannot pay fines. So, if they can't pay a fine, and can't be jailed, what, then? Scold them, and say not to do it again, and send them on their way?

You should jail the sellers and rehabilitate the users. That's common sense. Come on!


That's not a bad plan, in some cases. An arrest, and a fine, works, with a requirement built in for rehabilitation. I am not saying have a long jail sentence, but no arrest at all?

No. Arrest. At. All. Period!



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 06:58 AM
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originally posted by: MysticPearl
a reply to: Krazysh0t

Do you even read the articles you link before going off on some tantrum?

10 hours.

10 hours does not equal 10 days.

It's not close.

I'll help you out. 10 hours isn't even close to one full day.


Thanks for the useless post pointing out a typo that is completely irrelevant to the bulk of my points, plus has already been pointed out to me. I'm so glad you contributed absolutely nothing to the thread.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 05:22 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I didn't say legalize drugs. I said to stop jailing people for possession. Which means decriminalization. Not legalization. Please learn the difference.


If something is illegal, then there needs to be a punishment for it. Drug users tend to be broke, and cannot pay fines. So, if they can't pay a fine, and can't be jailed, what, then? Scold them, and say not to do it again, and send them on their way?

You should jail the sellers and rehabilitate the users. That's common sense. Come on!


That's not a bad plan, in some cases. An arrest, and a fine, works, with a requirement built in for rehabilitation. I am not saying have a long jail sentence, but no arrest at all?

No. Arrest. At. All. Period!


Why not? A crime was committed. Many times, a person is under the influence, and driving. There are some valid reasons for arrest. There is a lot out of control in the "war on drugs", I agree, but drastic steps the other direction won't help.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

It's only a crime because the state said so! We can change that with the stroke of a pen. Also what is this about driving under the influence? That is a completely separate issue. I'm SPECIFICALLY talking about just being arrested for using or possessing a small quantity. Don't move the goal posts back on me.

PS: Not arresting someone for using isn't a "drastic step", it's a common sense erring on the side of humanity.
edit on 4-8-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 08:44 AM
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I was once detained for several hours while a cop waited on a Sargent to come and test the white powder in a travel Tylenol container that I used to keep Tums in (I have acid reflux). I told him over and over again to taste it that it was peppermint tums. He wouldn't do it. After close to 3 hours the Sgt. Showed up and they found out it was tums. Then did he apologize? Nope, wrote me a ticket for the rear license plate being obscured by mud. Cops are totally worthless today.



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: damwel
Cops are totally worthless today.


Unless you are the state and in need of oncome.....




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