It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Cockroach milk could be the superfood of the future

page: 2
12
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 07:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: bbarkow
...bug parts and rodent crap.


Manna from the gods.




posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 07:54 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

not anymore i dont.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 07:55 AM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Maybe one of these days I'll post some tricks of the trade. But all of that stuff is readily available to read.

So how long until they're splicing cockroach genes into milk cows? Not long, I'd wager.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 07:59 AM
link   
a reply to: Gin

How the hell, laboratory conditions or otherwise, would you go about milking a Cockroach?

Im not saying it cant be done, just wondering how?

Tell you this stuff having that job, the manky little blighters freak me right out!



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:06 AM
link   
This is gross and ridiculous!

Not only is it disgusting but milk is for baby cows! No milk is legitimately suitable for human consumption! Why do you think so many thousands and thousands of people are lactose intolerant! Either the body has to force itself to adapt and figure out how to digest the sugar enzymes contained in milk or it can't, hence - lactose intolerant. Human babies only have the enzyme to break down milk sugars they receive from their mothers... human mothers. Once weaned, the body expels that enzyme as it is no longer needed. Our dairy industry will have you believe that milk is an important staple in the human diet when in reality it's actually harmful to our bodies. I would imagine that applies to insect milk as well. Jeez...



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:08 AM
link   
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

That's True.

notmilk.com...


Gin

posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:10 AM
link   
a reply to: andy06shake

journals.iucr.org...


2. Materials and methods

2.1. Crystal isolation from in vivo conditions

Crystals were extracted from D. punctata embryo midguts. The cockroaches, which were fed Lab Chow (Purina, St Louis, Missouri, USA) and water, were maintained at an ambient temperature of 27°C, with a light and dark cycle of 12 h each. 12 fertilized eggs are deposited in the brood sac of 7–8-day-old mated females. To obtain crystals, embryos were gently extruded from the brood sac of a 54-day-old female. The midgut was isolated from each embryo by cutting off the head and the end of the abdomen, allowing the midgut to be extruded into insect Ringer's solution. Supplementary Movie S1 shows how a cut made in the midgut allows its contents to be extruded by the contraction of muscles in the midgut wall. Crystals were collected in a Pasteur pipette and transferred to fresh sterile water, in which they are insoluble. Prior to X-ray diffraction experiments, crystals were cryoprotected in 20% glycerol and flash-cooled in liquid N2.

2.2. Crystallographic data-collection procedure for high-resolution crystals

Data to 1.20 Å resolution were measured using a MAR CCD detector on beamline PXII at the Swiss Light Source (SLS), Villigen, Switzerland at a wavelength of 0.8349 Å (Pohl et al., 2006). The sample-to-detector distance was set to 100 mm. All data collections were performed at cryo-temperatures using a 70 K nitrogen stream. Individual data sets were reduced with the d*TREK software (Pflugrath, 1999).

2.3. Recrystallization and data collection of solubilized protein

Lili-Mip crystals obtained in vivo were solubilized in 50 mM sodium acetate pH 5.0. Size-exclusion chromatography was carried out on the solubilized protein using a Superdex 200 prep-grade column. The protein eluted as a homogenous and monodisperse fraction at 95.5 ml and was used for crystallization. Based on the Bio-Rad Gel Filtration Standard (Bio-Rad catalogue No. 151-1901), the Lili-Mip protein was calculated to elute as a monomer with a molecular weight of about 24 kDa. Purified Lili-Mip was crystallized in 25% PEG 10 000 at a concentration of 2 mg ml−1 and a temperature of 293 K. The high PEG concentration in the crystallization condition served as the cryoprotectant and hence additional PEG or glycerol were not added. The sizes of the recrystallized and the in vivo grown crystals were similar. The size of the crystal used for data collection was about 15 × 20 µm. X-ray diffraction data for these crystals was collected on the PROXIMA-1 beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron, France, at a wavelength of 0.97857 Å. The sample-to-detector distance was set to 270.6 mm. All data collections were performed at cryotemperature using a 100 K nitrogen stream.


Nothing like milking a cow.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:24 AM
link   
a reply to: Gin

I did not think it would be "like milking a cow". LoL

Physiologically Cockroaches are of potential interest regarding many aspects. Have to say through the dam things creep me right out!

Don't mind Spiders or most other critters but Cockroaches have me running for the hills.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:26 AM
link   

originally posted by: awareness10
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

That's True.

notmilk.com...


Awesome! Thank you
usually when I make claim like that I get a lot of blow-back from milk drinkers!


Gin

posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:30 AM
link   

originally posted by: andy06shake
I did not think it would be "like milking a cow". LoL


Yeah, I know. Though it's funny to imagine some poor guy in a lab trying to milk a cockroach with magnifying glass and pincets.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:34 AM
link   
I'll have me some cockroach milk with my cornflakes in the morning lol.

Would have to taste it first.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 08:36 AM
link   
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

Youre Welcome


I know i found that site 10 yrs ago, and people were so pro milk they'd call you derogatory names just for mentioning it.




posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 09:04 AM
link   
June bugs taste like Cheetos.
You want to pluck their spiky legs off.
They'll hang in your throat.
Probably goes pretty good with some roach milk.
edit on 25-7-2016 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 09:25 AM
link   

originally posted by: awareness10
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

Youre Welcome


I know i found that site 10 yrs ago, and people were so pro milk they'd call you derogatory names just for mentioning it.



Yes! But it's not their fault really... they're all brain washed by the dairy industry!



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 10:58 AM
link   
a reply to: Scorpiogurl

Lactose intolerance is often found in societies that did not come out of Europe, particularly NW Europe. Presumably NW European genetic culture evolved with the adoption of an agrarian society where cattle, sheep and goats predominated.

As to the OP. Cockroach milk is not really milk. You get milk from mammals and not from insects. The OP is about getting some white gut-fluid from a cockroach which is not milk, but may be white. There's a big difference. You don't call white paint "milk", or bubble bath foam "milk", so why call gut-fluid-extract from an insect "milk"?

On eating insects and insect products. No chance. Let others get their protein that way. I will stick to what I am used to.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 12:11 PM
link   
How does one milk a cockroach?

I'm picturing that scene from Meet the Fockers where Ben Stiller tries to explain "milking a cat" to Robert Deniro.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 12:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: DerBeobachter
I wnated to try by myself and milk one, caught a cockrach, but the problem is to get a bucket under that damned roach...


........ and then to find their teats and express the milk. A cumbersome job.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 12:15 PM
link   
a reply to: DerBeobachter

Bucket issues? Try finding the effing nipples!

You can milk anything with nipples...




posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 12:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: DerBeobachter

Bucket issues? Try finding the effing nipples!

You can milk anything with nipples...








posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 12:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Gin

I really can't help how dumb this sounds but...

I can milk a cow, a goat, and maybe even a horse;

but how do you milk a cockroach??



new topics

top topics



 
12
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join