It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

SCI/TECH: Stepping Down from the Ivory Tower

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 07:41 AM
link   
Scientists and professors should do more than research and teach. They need to build bridges between academic knowledge and every day life, says communication Professor Richard Cherwitz, founder and director of the Intellectual Entrepreneurship Program at the University of Texas at Austin. He sees bridge-building as a necessary "service" - a way to make higher learning useful to everyone, and "transform lives for the benefit of society."


 



www.the-scientist.com
"...service is often portrayed as a university's third function – taking a back seat to and competing with research and teaching – instead of as academic engagement, in which collaboration and partnership with the community produce solutions to society's most vexing problems. Service is, after all, the ethical imperative driving research and teaching as well as a principal product of these enterprises. Discharging this duty in an ever-changing world requires radically rethinking "service," finding innovative ways to leverage academe's intellectual capital to transform lives for the benefit of society.

...service should be pursued by prominent scientists and humanists who, while understanding the distinctive mission of research institutions, also recognize the need to build connections between the university and community and who refuse to apologize for being scholars. After all, creating a culture of academic engagement requires accountability and collaborative problem-solving in forthright public exchanges about how to enact change. This cannot be accomplished by any one academic discipline or sector; it's up to the whole academy."



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This way of thinking was popular back in the 1960's and 70's and for that matter, during every important revolution. It disappeared when academic institutions came to rely on corporate support - and forgot about their roots. The power of the fission helped split the nation into Red and Blue states and also, into educated-professional and uneducated-worker classes.

Academics do have much to offer their communities and no, should not 'apologize for being scholars.' At the same time, a little humility might be in order. "Uneducated" working people have a lot to give too.

Obviously, the academics need to make the overtures. But just making the effort, and trying to work together with respect for one another, could produce a wobble like the one created by Asia's tsunami. If the gaps are bridged properly between workers and academic professionals, the power of the fusion could affect the revolution of the planet - and get democracy back on course.


Related News Links:
www.nap.edu
webspace.utexas.edu... " target="_blank" class="postlink">https:
webspace.utexas.edu... " target="_blank" class="postlink">https:
webspace.utexas.edu... " target="_blank" class="postlink">https:

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
High IQ members and the nature of intelligence
OP/ED: The Importance of Community




posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 07:53 AM
link   
While I feel that most acidemic institutuions have lost touch woiht the community they live in, there are a few still willing to open thier arms to the community, though few and far between. I believe there is a stigma cast by the uneducated upon those with an education. It doesnt help the fact that many professors tend to look down on an uneducated person with a slight bit of pity, something the common man really does not want.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 08:01 AM
link   
Does that include non-liberal academics like myself? Or just leftist? There Many academics are "consumed" in their research 24/7 and have little time nor the social graces to mix with "normal" people.

If "academics" will stick to their respective subjects and stop "social" engineering then this is fine. UT is the center of socialist "engineering".

There is an "arrogance" factor to overcome also.

This is more of a cry of "foul" that the "masses" have learned to think without being told "what" to think like back in the 60's.





[edit on 19-1-2005 by DrHoracid]



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 08:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by DrHoracid
Does that include non-liberal academics like myself?



Absolutely. ...If you have something productive to share in a respectful way.




There Many academics are "consumed" in their research 24/7 and have little time nor the social graces to mix with "normal" people.



Time to get real, participate and function responsibly as a productive member of the larger community. Everyone involved will learn from the experience - and our lives depend on it.




If "academics" will stick to their respective subjects and stop "social" engineering then this is fine. UT is the center of socialist "engineering".


Looks more like the eugenicists/"quantitative geneticists" are working in overdrive on 'social engineering.'



There is an "arrogance" factor to overcome also.


You betcha.



This is more of a cry of "foul" that the "masses" have learned to think without being told "what" to think like back in the 60's.


No. This is a plea to use all of the nation's resources, democratically. And for people to come together, respectfully and cooperatively, to share whatever it is they have to offer.



.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 09:32 AM
link   
So many "academics" are involved in very technical and ofthen classified research. So only "humanities" based prof's can really try to participate with normal humans.

Many of my "pointy headed" associates have few social skills.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 10:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by DrHoracid
So many "academics" are involved in very technical and ofthen classified research.

Many of my "pointy headed" associates have few social skills.



Acknowledged - effort is required. ...and the lack of effort places us squarely in the biblical Babel. IMO - if the 'language barrier' is not removed, the tower will fall.



.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 10:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by Kidfinger
I believe there is a stigma cast by the uneducated upon those with an education. It doesnt help the fact that many professors tend to look down on an uneducated person with a slight bit of pity, something the common man really does not want.



Sorry Dad - didn't mean to diss you. ...You're right: there's a chasm between the educated and uneducated. ...My sense is that educated people have to make the effort, without being patronizing, and let others know they don't think themselves superior (even if they do).

Gotta start somewhere...



.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 11:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by soficrow

Originally posted by Kidfinger
I believe there is a stigma cast by the uneducated upon those with an education. It doesnt help the fact that many professors tend to look down on an uneducated person with a slight bit of pity, something the common man really does not want.



Sorry Dad - didn't mean to diss you. ...You're right: there's a chasm between the educated and uneducated. ...My sense is that educated people have to make the effort, without being patronizing, and let others know they don't think themselves superior (even if they do).

Gotta start somewhere...



.


Lose the term "uneducated". Many, many, of those whom never entered or finished "college" are very well "educated" without an academic seal on their wall. Many have be somewhat successful.. Einstien and Bill Gates. Too many "academics" have superior "ego's" not intellect.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 12:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by soficrow
Scientists and professors should do more than research and teach. They need to build bridges between academic knowledge and every day life, says communication Professor Richard Cherwitz, founder and director of the Intellectual Entrepreneurship Program at the University of Texas at Austin. He sees bridge-building as a necessary "service" - a way to make higher learning useful to everyone, and "transform lives for the benefit of society."

Why must they do this? So that complex scientific concepts can be reduced to simple analogies that we can use as party chatter? So that everyone can feel that they are smarter?



"...service is often portrayed as a university's third function – taking a back seat to and competing with research and teaching – instead of as academic engagement, in which collaboration and partnership with the community produce solutions to society's most vexing problems.

That's the purpose of applied research. Pure research may and often does produce results that are not used for years in the future, if at all. Each has it's purpose and it's place.


Service is, after all, the ethical imperative driving research and teaching as well as a principal product of these enterprises. Discharging this duty in an ever-changing world requires radically rethinking "service," finding innovative ways to leverage academe's intellectual capital to transform lives for the benefit of society.

I'll agree that certain things, like offering free seminars, might be viewed as beneficial to society. But I wouldn't expect a research engineer to solve a drainage restriction levied by a zoning board.


...service should be pursued by prominent scientists and humanists who, while understanding the distinctive mission of research institutions, also recognize the need to build connections between the university and community and who refuse to apologize for being scholars.

Lol. I don't know anyone who resents academics. Most often, they are happily accepted as just another member of society. No special privileges or respect should be accorded to them.


This way of thinking was popular back in the 1960's and 70's and for that matter, during every important revolution. It disappeared when academic institutions came to rely on corporate support - and forgot about their roots. The power of the fission helped split the nation into Red and Blue states and also, into educated-professional and uneducated-worker classes.

Lol once again. Please, tell us how reliance on corporate support "helped split the nation into Red and Blue states and also, into educated-professional and uneducated-worker classes."

I'd hesitate to respect someone merely because they have a string of degrees; at the same time I'd respect the effort it takes to achieve those degrees. Many people with certain degrees have no alternative except to remain in academia, since their skills are not in demand in the real world.

The world is, thankfully, made up of all types of people, educated and not-formally-educated, and that's what makes it so interesting. Both camps can learn from each other.




posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 12:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by DrHoracid

Lose the term "uneducated". Many, many, of those whom never entered or finished "college" are very well "educated"



Totally agree. ...Do you have a better word? "Formally educated" is a bit of a mouthful...




Too many "academics" have superior "ego's" not intellect.


Agree here too - but maybe some good times 'slumming' might provide some perspective...



.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 12:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by jsobecky

Originally posted by soficrow
Scientists and professors should do more than research and teach. They need to build bridges between academic knowledge and every day life, says communication Professor Richard Cherwitz, founder and director of the Intellectual Entrepreneurship Program at the University of Texas at Austin. He sees bridge-building as a necessary "service" - a way to make higher learning useful to everyone, and "transform lives for the benefit of society."

Why must they do this?


Hmmm. The first paragraph is always a synopsis of the article. But IMO - Cherwitz explains himself pretty well. As I paraphrased,



"He sees bridge-building as a necessary "service" - a way to make higher learning useful to everyone, and "transform lives for the benefit of society." "


...You go on to quote the article, but apparently want me to defend the writer's words...



...service should be pursued by prominent scientists and humanists who, while understanding the distinctive mission of research institutions, also recognize the need to build connections between the university and community and who refuse to apologize for being scholars.

Lol. I don't know anyone who resents academics. Most often, they are happily accepted as just another member of society. No special privileges or respect should be accorded to them.


IMO - the writer is identifying a real rift - with real consequences to society. ...Also, I like his idea of "service" - goes beyond personal gain.





This way of thinking was popular back in the 1960's and 70's and for that matter, during every important revolution. It disappeared when academic institutions came to rely on corporate support - and forgot about their roots. The power of the fission helped split the nation into Red and Blue states and also, into educated-professional and uneducated-worker classes.

Lol once again. Please, tell us how reliance on corporate support "helped split the nation into Red and Blue states and also, into educated-professional and uneducated-worker classes."


Just a historical observation.



The world is, thankfully, made up of all types of people, educated and not-formally-educated, and that's what makes it so interesting. Both camps can learn from each other.




Exactly the point of the original article - and the thrust of my own comments.



.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 12:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by DrHoracid
[
Lose the term "uneducated". Many, many, of those whom never entered or finished "college" are very well "educated" without an academic seal on their wall. Many have be somewhat successful.. Einstien and Bill Gates. Too many "academics" have superior "ego's" not intellect.


You are absolutly correct. I did choose the wrong terminology to get my point accross. The term I should have used is: those without a higher education. There are many people who have educated themselves and done a better job at it then most people who go to college. But those people make up a very small minority. When I said 'uneducated', I ment those who do not fall into this majority and those who have not educated themselves. Sorry Doc.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 01:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by soficrow



Sorry Dad - didn't mean to diss you. ...You're right: there's a chasm between the educated and uneducated. ...My sense is that educated people have to make the effort, without being patronizing, and let others know they don't think themselves superior (even if they do).

Gotta start somewhere...



.


No worries Sofi
I didnt take anything you have said as a diss.

I think patronization of those without a higher education by those with a higher education is one of the biggest problems with the ubiquitis sharing of scientific knowledge.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 01:10 PM
link   
Hi soficrow

It might appear that I didn't read the entire article, and I didn't, because the link took me to a registration page.




posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 01:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by DrHoracid
Lose the term "uneducated". Many, many, of those whom never entered or finished "college" are very well "educated" without an academic seal on their wall. Many have be somewhat successful.. Einstien and Bill Gates. Too many "academics" have superior "ego's" not intellect.


Actually, Gates is a college dropout. He is, however, college educated.

And Dr. Einstein did indeed have legitimate degrees and did finish college. And far from being a humble man, he was a fairly abrasive individual -- which is why, after graduating college, he had to go work in the Patents Office instead of at a physics research center or university as he had hoped to do:
www.phys.ufl.edu...

In 1909 he became an Assistant Professor of physics (something you can only do with a Masters' or PhD.)



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 01:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by jsobecky
Hi soficrow

It might appear that I didn't read the entire article, and I didn't, because the link took me to a registration page.




Ooops. Sorry. ...Yes, registration is required - and very well worth the trouble.

The Scientist is an Open Access journal - that just recently cut much of its Open Access content.


...It's part of BioMed Central, a well-respected world wide Open Access group of scientific publications. Last I checked, all the major universities and institutions were on board. ...So credibility is pretty solid.



.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 01:25 PM
link   
Thanks Byrd for your clarification.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join