It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Super-hard metal 'four times tougher than titanium'

page: 2
16
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 06:33 PM
link   
a reply to: cavtrooper7

I don't understand the question.




posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 06:36 PM
link   
a reply to: thesungod

Is it a damascus application at the molecular level?
How are the metals BLENDED?
edit on 24-7-2016 by cavtrooper7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 07:33 PM
link   
a reply to: cavtrooper7

Ah. That info wasn't released, I assume to protect the product sort of thing.

If I had to guess from reading the technical data I'd say yes or at least in part. I do know from the data that they mixed them during various "phases of state."

I am not a metals expert, a HAM at best.



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 07:48 PM
link   
a reply to: thesungod
AH that would mean PLASMATIC, I think or molecular (?)a deposit method of some kind, maybe.
Meta materials are popping up so much it's hard to keep track anymore...

edit on 24-7-2016 by cavtrooper7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 09:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: cavtrooper7
a reply to: thesungod

Is it a damascus application at the molecular level?
How are the metals BLENDED?


They are intermetallic compounds rather than blobs of one metal in another. Consider them products of a chemical reaction.
They are melted and mixed. Sometimes melting has to be repeated a few times. In this case, the melting point is lower than titanium alone which is an advantage. Hardness is important for wear resistance of mating parts as is biocompatibility for medical applications.



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 10:09 PM
link   
a reply to: pteridine

Awesome. A metal nerd, no offense. It's a badge of honor in my book.

What exactly do they mean by mixing them at various phases of state?

Like mixing them at various stages of melting? That's my guess anyway.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 12:08 AM
link   
a reply to: pteridine

Unfortunately it uses GOLD so we can't build the NEXT A-10 from it.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 01:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: thesungod
a reply to: Substracto

Yep. A lot of gold used in the space industry as well. I'm curious if this alloy will have any uses in that field.


It would seem like a logical choice.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 09:59 AM
link   
cpb.iphy.ac.cn...
Gold under high pressure is very tough, but we think for some reasons that it is very soft



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 08:36 AM
link   
a reply to: thesungod

And combine this new alloy with the other Ti alloy called Nitinol, and we have super hard and resilient materials, that can morph shape, perform actions and orientate itself depending on temperatures applied to the alloy.

Interesting biotechnology potential.

Imagine an artificial heart made from Ti3Au and NiTi, which could 'beat' and of course pump blood due to a small heating element turning on and off 60 or 70 times a minute, and you end up with a very tough, body safe heart, no rejection issues and the more it beats, expanding and contracting the NiTI lattice, it gets stronger as it goes.

Who needs to grow an organic heart when one made of this stuff and NiTi could last several lifetimes?



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 12:07 PM
link   
a reply to: MysterX

Rejection/Immunosuppression drugs are some of the worst, despite being a life saver. The whole tacro/sirolimus line are killers.




top topics



 
16
<< 1   >>

log in

join