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Why Is Gold So Important?

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posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 01:00 AM
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What is it about gold? Why has it from the beginning of currency been crowned a necessity?
If this isn't in the appropriate category, please move it to where it should be. Sorry.

Summary Of History of Gold:
4000 B.C ~ 1500 B.C gold is most use for decorative/jewellery purposes. After 1500 B.C gold becomes recognized as the standard medium of exchange for international trade. Based on the article I'm getting this information from, that point is rather unclear. I've made the assumption that +/- 1000 years the method of gold as currency was gaining traction globally. I don't have a clue how they measured that, but I'll just go with it for lack of info. So an estimated 3500 years ago, gold became the world's primary currency. Over the next 1000 years, gold continued to become transformed into money. 344 B.C Alexander the Great and his army of 40,000 raids the Persian Empire for gold(actually, just robbery but they call it 'military'). 1816 A. D Great Britain officially ties the pound to a specific quantity of gold at which British currency is convertible.
Source

(Just took a melatonin tab, every from this point may sound a tab bit off, sorry.)

Uses of Gold:
Initially while typing this up, I had seen it as just jewelry and a good conductor. However. My eyes have been opened just a bit more to the fact that it's actually a great metal. But there's still much that is left unexplained.


  1. Durable, Beautiful jewelry
  2. Great conductor
  3. Used in dentistry
  4. Money
  5. Quite a few other things, check the source for more

Source


My question; Why is the world so swayed by this metal? It's not one that is used much more than it is stored. The majority of gold is used for Jewelry(52%) followed by savings(18%)/investments(16%) and the smaller bits used for industrial production(12%) and lastly 2% completely unaccounted for, probably some people having it under their mattress. Understanding all above, those things are trivial, they are all concepts created by us, shaped by us; Meaning, we shaped that reality, one man made it jewelry another liked it and the trend continued until it became our reality. Why does it hold such a significant value to this day when most of it is used for just jewelry, which offers no health benefits, or significant impact in our development.

How is it that we've taken possibly our most useful metal for advancement, hike the price and then use it for jewelry? I don't know if I'm making sense here, but think along the lines of money being anchored to gold, which is essentially useless, at least the way we use it. We've developed new currency, why is gold still the anchor? Was there more than just it's durability and beauty in jewelry? Does gold jewelry assist mentally or physically?

How wide do scientists go when classifying a mental illness, if it affects everyone, is it still a mental illness? Our governments, and 'brightest minds' are literally stuck on segregating and dehumanizing our fellow human for pseudo-gold, made from the ever occurring and very renewable 'tree'.
Source


edit on 23-7-2016 by SuspiciousTom because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 03:42 AM
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I disagree... somewhat. The Mayans never had a definitive currency and jade was quite popular both with them and the Chinese. Sure, gold became popular in their lands, but so did gemstones and semi-precious rocks in Europe. We still value these things today, but we value gold more, like the Europeans did. I'd argue that gold isn't valuable for its uses and that it isn't valuable because all of humanity gravitates to it. Rather that humanity gravitates to all things sparkly, shiny, or interesting, but that gold was the one that those who conquered the world were taken with.

It was valuable like silver and others, but I'd argue that what set gold apart was the great marketing of incorporating it into religion. Once gold became synonymous with holiness and purity people wanted it more. (this paragraph is purely opinion&conjecture.)

Now European countries fanned out to all corners of the world, and gold was among the primary things they took where they went. As you say, British currency became backed with it and being, even indirectly, it became the currency of the most powerful nation in the world. Now, generally we're drawn to it because culturally it symbolizes wealth, same with silver though to a lesser extent.

Then good old science came along replicating diamonds. Heck, most gemstones are molecules not elements. Gold however is an element between iron and lead. Why is this important? Fusion occurs within stars, first from hydrogen to helium, but as the star gains mass you get atoms with more and more protons in the center of the star. If it burns out you're left with a hunk of that element (and probably others of a lower atomic number.) Now when you get to the point of fusing iron your star goes supernova on you. Supernovas spit out elements of all sorts of atomic number, but those above lead eventually decay back down to it as they decay. Thus that magic window makes it not only rare, but impossible to artificially reproduce for the foreseeable future. Everyone likes a stable investment.

Anywho, there is current demand for it as a conductor in computers, but like with jewellery the old gets recycled into the new, so while it should bump demand, ideally it's not constantly pulling demand. Also the trait that makes it good for dentistry, plating tableware, ect, is that it's particularly stable, that is nonreactive. You don't get metallic ions in your mouth leaching off of it. Primarily I'd peg its value on European culture though. After all, there's hardly a place on earth it hasn't permeated. Had a culture that celebrated mercury or osmium conquered the world to the extent Europe did, I'd think we'd care more for quicksilver then for silver and gold.

Of course I don't have too many links on hand, so I hope you'll excuse their absence. It didn't really seem right to through out somewhat arbitrary and unestablished sources to counter your point.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 05:12 AM
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It makes good fishing-line sinkers.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 05:16 AM
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a reply to: SuspiciousTom

In reality it's not. You've just been brainwashed to believe it's cool and hip and whatever people refer to these days.

Im truly sorry.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 05:18 AM
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I think it looks cheap and tacky myself.
Wouldn't mind a pound of it though.
I think it is shiny and doesn't react with the atmosphere so It is a good thing to barter with.
edit on 23-7-2016 by TheKnightofDoom because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 05:18 AM
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I had bought myself a really nice gold ring with some other sort of stone and when I wore it in front of a pissy customer, she calmed down and showed some decency towards me... some weird power it has... it is connected to the sun and actually does hold healing energy... much like the new age copper supposed effects. Will look for a reference if you don't take my word for it.
Silver is connected to moon energies.

Okay, here is some new age mumbo jumbo to back up what I just wrote, Gold properties
edit on 23-7-2016 by peppycat because: mumbo jumbo added



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 05:27 AM
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originally posted by: TheKnightofDoom
I think it looks cheap and tacky myself.
Wouldn't mind a pound of it though.
I think it is shiny and doesn't react with the atmosphere so It is a good thing to barter with.


That's because it is cheap and crappy #.

all i can say is when the F'CK are the Vikings gonna show up.? Anyone? Bueller?



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 06:17 AM
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a reply to: SuspiciousTom

Its religious , nothing more to it really..



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: SuspiciousTom

Gold exhibits incorruptibility and it survives the fire. Eat it. It's good.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 07:00 AM
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Gold was originally popular for all those reasons stated above, but now, in modern times we have some extremely valuable applications for gold.

-On the medical front, we may be able to use gold particles to kill certain tyoes of cancer cells.

-Gold is extensively used in soace applications. It blocks IR waves, and also provides protection from radiation.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 07:18 AM
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Because it's what we wrap our almond Hershey kisses with???😁



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 07:18 AM
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Sorry don't know how that happened, it was only supposed to be one post
edit on Sat20167V201641731 by DonVoigt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 07:18 AM
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edit on Sat20167V201635731 by DonVoigt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 07:18 AM
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edit on Sat20167V201628731 by DonVoigt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 07:58 AM
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Well,

According to Zechariah Stichin (sp?), gold dust is used to protect the Annunaki's home planet atmosphere in deep space.

The lizard people created humans to mine the gold, so they could ship it off to their planet; then the half-ape half-reptile humans rebelled and the rest is history.




posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 08:01 AM
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It's relatively rare.

It's relatively inert, so it doesn't chemically bond with much. It doesn't tarnish or rust.

It's relatively easy to mine with primitive tools.

It's a soft metal at relatively lower temperature, so not really of much use for weapons or shields. But it can be pounded into shapes that are not easily bent by human hands at room temperature... even hot summer temps. It's better than soft carvable stones, because those are brittle and can break when dropped or hit. Gold might just bend or dent, but can be repaired with heat and skill.

It's shiny.


So what you end up is with in 'ye olden times' a durable metal that is harder to find than tin, iron or copper, and it doesn't corrode over time. It isn't good for much more than looking good and being heavy so it can be formed into shapes that have significance and won't change. Eventually trade and barter expand to need some physical token that conveys value but won't fall apart/break like teeth, claw, bone or soft stone.

The choice to use gold was a process of elimination and rarity.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 08:20 AM
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I've been meaning to post a thread about how worthless gold is, but first I need to find a UNIVAC that will connect to the internet.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: GodEmperor
Well,

According to Zechariah Stichin (sp?), gold dust is used to protect the Annunaki's home planet atmosphere in deep space.

The lizard people created humans to mine the gold, so they could ship it off to their planet; then the half-ape half-reptile humans rebelled and the rest is history.



Yeah, well, it seams man's fascination with gold was learnt from his creators. But, in ancient Egypt silver was once valued more highly than gold. And silver actually has a lot of good uses. Silver kills bacteria. Even though people didn't know about bacteria long ago, they learnt from experience that using silverware to eat and drink protected people from various sicknesses. This idea of silver as a protector from ill, became incorporated into various myths like silver metal to kill vampires and werewolves. Silver has the highest electrical conductivity of any elemental metal, although in modern times we've discovered that some nano-materials made from carbon can conduct electricity even better than silver. Wearing silver metal prevents spirit possession, so people often made amulets of silver to wear for protection from evil. Interestingly, Freemasonry requires the initiate to remove all metal from his body before initiation, because it interferes with the procedures. Hmmmm....

But, silver has one major problem: it oxidizes and turns black in air.

This is where gold comes in. It doesn't oxidize, so a piece of gold metal will remain pure gold for as long as you have it. While, silver will gradually deteriorate, and even though you can "polish" the silver to recover the shiny lustre, that polishing removes the black oxide which contains some of the original silver atoms. So, you'd end up with less silver over time. Hence, as a permanent store of value, gold became more useful.

But, gold doesn't kill bacteria. Eating on gold plates doesn't provide any benefits. And gold is heavy, and troublesome to transport. Although, maybe gold protects against spirit possession, since the Freemasons say "all metal" must be removed.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 09:05 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH
But, gold doesn't kill bacteria. Eating on gold plates doesn't provide any benefits.


I think they got that confused with silver and copper. Although, because it is chemically inert gold was sometimes used in tooth fillings.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 09:41 AM
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Gold is important today because the debt orchestrated, fiat money system of money-out-of-thin-air,,, is on the verge of collapse

further more... prophecy in Daniel tells of 'king Nebuchadnezzar ' being the Head-of-Gold in his dream about the Statue which represents the sequential global empires... and that the realization of the Dream would be kept closed until the 'End-of-Age'... so for the astute interpreter of prophecy the hidden clue that Gold then Silver would be the TWO ways in which to rely for escaping the grip of the Final anti-Christ Empire of 10 nations spanning both the East & West hemispheres

now, common folk would not acknowledge such a complex reasoning for Gold/Silver having a Value that transcends economies, military might, industry, commerce...
They will just ape out the idea that Gold has over 6,000 years of history as a storage-of-wealth...
which might again be equivalent to 1 oz silver= 1 Day wage
AND 1 oz gold = 5 Weeks wages ~~>> or a 30:1 Ratio on a 6 day work week




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