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posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: tikbalang
a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

Baghdad battery is an old invention, likely used for cleaning..


Newsflash
they were storage jars for scrolls, this has been known now for about twenty years , so don't be embarrassed that you're waaaay in the past




posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

yeah, maybe. but what does it power?
whats the use of a battery with no appliance



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: Marduk

I'll build myself a big jar and store scrolls



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

well i hate to back up marduk here but mice
like paper
if you can tell me what the battery of 0.4 to 1.2volts might be used for.
or it could be part of a larger cell, i ll give you that but what would they need it for?
edit on 3-8-2016 by username74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: username74

I expressed what I believe it was used for..



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

ah, sorry, missed that.
cleaning what?
gotta ask



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: username74

Electrolysis



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: username74

i just have a horrible feeling youre going to say copper toilet utensils



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: username74

electrolysis isnt really cleaning though is it?



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

door stones.
it was Strabo, the stones were gone by first century.



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: username74

Strabo c. 24 BC. (Extract from (16). Taken from 'The geography of Strabo' (Trans. By H. L. Jones) (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons) Vol. III, p. 84-5).

On proceeding forty stadia from the city, one comes to a kind of mountain-brow; on it are numerous pyramids, the tombs of kings, of which three are noteworthy; and two of these are even numbered among the seven wonders of the world, for they are a stadium in height, are quadrangular in shape, and their height is a little greater than the length of each of the sides; and one of them is only a little larger than the other. High up, approximately midway between the sides, it has a movable stone, and when raised up there is a sloping passage to the vault. Now these pyramids are near one another and on the same level; but further on, at a greater height of the hill, is the third, which is much smaller than the two, though constructed at much greater expense; for from the foundation almost to the middle it is made of black stone, the stone from which mortars are made, being brough from a great distance, for it is brought from the mountains of Aetheopia; and because of its being hard and difficult to work into shape it rendered the undertaking very expensive. It is called 'Tomb of the courtesan', having been built by her lovers the courtesan whom Sappho the Melic poetess calls Doricha, the beloved of Sappho's brother Charaxus, who was engaged in transporting lesbian wine to Naucratis for sale, but others give her the name Rhodopis. They tell the fabulous story that, when she was bathing, an eagle snatched one of her sandals from her maid and carried it to Memphis; and while the king was administering justice in the open air, the eagle, when it arrived above his head, flung the sandal into his lap; and the king, stirred both by the beautiful shape of the sandal and by the strangeness of the occurrence, sent men in all directions into the country in quest of the woman who wore the sandal; and when she was founding the city of Naucratis, she was brought up to Memphis, became the wife of the king, and when she died was honoured with the above mentioned tomb.

The section concerning the 'moveable stone' has been variously translated. The following is a modern translation (ref lost), which supports the idea that the stone 'door' was a similar mechanism as that found in the 'South pyramid of Dashur' (See Petrie). "The Greater (Pyramid), a little way up one side, has a stone that may be taken out , (exairesimon, exemptilem) which being raised up (arqentoV, sublato) there is a sloping passage to the foundations."



posted on Aug, 5 2016 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: username74

oooh,look what i've found!
i have no idea about this website, so earthmilk, yeah , i know, sounds nasty, but a photo is a photo, enjoy
earthmilkancientenergy.com...



posted on Aug, 5 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: username74

Strabo c. 24 BC. (Extract from (16). Taken from 'The geography of Strabo' (Trans. By H. L. Jones) (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons) Vol. III, p. 84-5).

On proceeding forty stadia from the city, one comes to a kind of mountain-brow; on it are numerous pyramids, the tombs of kings, of which three are noteworthy; and two of these are even numbered among the seven wonders of the world, for they are a stadium in height, are quadrangular in shape, and their height is a little greater than the length of each of the sides; and one of them is only a little larger than the other. High up, approximately midway between the sides, it has a movable stone, and when raised up there is a sloping passage to the vault. Now these pyramids are near one another and on the same level; but further on, at a greater height of the hill, is the third, which is much smaller than the two, though constructed at much greater expense; for from the foundation almost to the middle it is made of black stone, the stone from which mortars are made, being brough from a great distance, for it is brought from the mountains of Aetheopia; and because of its being hard and difficult to work into shape it rendered the undertaking very expensive. It is called 'Tomb of the courtesan', having been built by her lovers the courtesan whom Sappho the Melic poetess calls Doricha, the beloved of Sappho's brother Charaxus, who was engaged in transporting lesbian wine to Naucratis for sale, but others give her the name Rhodopis.


Strabo is claiming the Giza pyramids are actually built for a famous sex worker of the ancient world...



They tell the fabulous story that, when she was bathing, an eagle snatched one of her sandals from her maid and carried it to Memphis; and while the king was administering justice in the open air, the eagle, when it arrived above his head, flung the sandal into his lap; and the king, stirred both by the beautiful shape of the sandal and by the strangeness of the occurrence, sent men in all directions into the country in quest of the woman who wore the sandal;


...whose sandal was carried for more than a thousand miles across ocean,desert, and mountains and dropped into the very lap of the pharaoh...


and when she was founding the city of Naucratis,

...about almost two thousand years after the pyramids were built (fourth dynasty), sometime during the 26th dynasty or so


she was brought up to Memphis, became the wife of the king, and when she died was honoured with the above mentioned tomb.

The section concerning the 'moveable stone' has been variously translated. The following is a modern translation (ref lost), which supports the idea that the stone 'door' was a similar mechanism as that found in the 'South pyramid of Dashur' (See Petrie). "The Greater (Pyramid), a little way up one side, has a stone that may be taken out , (exairesimon, exemptilem) which being raised up (arqentoV, sublato) there is a sloping passage to the foundations."


Question: Why should we take as accurate a section of something that is so wildly inaccurate?



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

yeah its pretty wild, thought you like it!
i dont know what the hell hes on about either, but the bit about the door?

Question: Why should we take as accurate a section of something that is so wildly inaccurate?
well more my point is, why do we take equally unsupported story that supports current theory, but more mundane.
not to say that i believe the eagle and sandal or whatever thing, obviously transcribed during a drinking game?
what about the door?
the mundane bit.
everyone documented who got into the thing knew roughly where they where going. they worked from sources we no longer possess. whats to say this is not genuine information thrown in there by one of antiquitys swingers



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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a reply to: username74

What were the Baghdad batteries for?
If they weren't for storing scrolls.
Which i don't dispute.
Just adding a thought here.

This is 12v, 2 wires and the lead from a pencil.
You could use much less volts. The effect would less. But, would still work.
Only one problem.
Where did the Egyptians get their pencils.
I'm just showing that there are useful applications for the theory.



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 01:29 PM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Byrd

yeah its pretty wild, thought you like it!
i dont know what the hell hes on about either, but the bit about the door?


...is actually similar to the doors that Hero of Alexandria made for temples.


well more my point is, why do we take equally unsupported story that supports current theory, but more mundane.
not to say that i believe the eagle and sandal or whatever thing, obviously transcribed during a drinking game?
what about the door?
the mundane bit.


Who knows. Where did he get the bit about the eagle that flew thousands of miles or dropping the sandal in the pharaoh's lap... and so forth?


everyone documented who got into the thing knew roughly where they where going. they worked from sources we no longer possess. whats to say this is not genuine information thrown in there by one of antiquitys swingers


Because it doesn't match anything physical about the pyramids, nor does it match other historical writings about the pyramids.

Herodotus is considered to be a slightly better ancient source, but still not as good as the records of the Egyptians themselves.



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: blackcrowe

ha ha, nice, reckon you could build one in the dark?
so i assume thats graphite, not lead, kind of like a little arc lamp, pretty cool, but its the amperage, its pretty high. to start a diesel engine it takes a bump. gotta store that potential and if they had batteries i imagine they would use fine sheet which spends its working life in acid then corrodes real quick. i reckon if we found a battery, it would resemble a battery, like ours, layers of metal in solution but such a thing would be gone forever after a millenia probably much less.
if you want to follow the sparky route, and i suppose its a remote possibility, then you need to look for infrastructure, like substations but i dont see their need for electricty on a supply demand or domestic basis, unless its just a trick with metal and fruit juice to clean jewellry but vinegar does that



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: Byrd



"Because it doesn't match anything physical about the pyramids, nor does it match other historical writings about the pyramids.

Herodotus is considered to be a slightly better ancient source, but still not as good as the records of the Egyptians themselves."

well it was supposed to be in the casing stones, and as for historical writings matching up, well .....
what about the capstones, perhaps the singular most significant feature, never mentioned, plenty on obelisks, pyramids , nada
but you think if someone managed to get the things off the top someone might have mentioned it. you would think at least a fireside tale
but no, and no record of it being put in place, although i stand to be corrected



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 01:47 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

i do like heros doors. thanks

thermo-siphon to expansion tank
beats the counterweights in the temple of doom

edit on 6-8-2016 by username74 because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-8-2016 by username74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2016 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: username74

To start a car. The amps are charged by the coil.
The pencil lead is just a piece of carbon.
Would they have made them in the dark? Or, used them in the dark.
I can only see to produce light as the only logical solution to explain the claim of Baghdad batteries.



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