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Turn on the pyramid...

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posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: Marduk

Overwhelming proof?

Are you seriously claiming that academia has overwhelming 'proof' of how, why and by whom the Giza pyramids were built?

Not by any stretch is that so...even academics themselves are honest enough to admit they have a theory, educated guesses supported by massive doses of speculation...nothing is proven one way or the other.

As such, any theory is valid...even outrageous ones, because quite often the Human species is just very surprising.

If you dug around Stonehenge, i'm sure you'll find masses of evidence of Human occupation of the site, utilisation of the monument and habitation associated tangible finds, that have absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with the site itself or it's original design purpose, and everything to do with generations of Human beings visiting and using the site for their own purposes since it was built...there is even graffiti left behind by generations of hippies that visit the stones...i expect these scrawls will become the basis for an academic hypothesis of who built the henge and when...'smiffy woz ere' will probably be thought of as one of the builders or a high priest of some kind, and the dating will be early - late 20th century based on analysis of the paint used to inscribe the stones....(!) the same is probably true for every ancient and lasting monument in the world (unless hidden or buried) including the Giza pyramids...which also happen to contain quite a lot of graffiti both ancient and modern.

So it's always going to be logical and reasonable to expect to find masses of ancient Egyptian artefacts around and in some cases within the monuments at Giza, considering the generations that have passed and visited the pyramids since their construction, and the fact that people are naturally drawn to awesome structures, and probably always will be.




posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: MysterX

in relation to stonehenge it almost certainly occurred because its a bottleneck for herd prey but also, in some remaining nearby ancient forest there is a water source that turns the freshly broken rocks pink, because of the ammonia content of the water and composition of the fresh bedrock, i think. i can do the same with sycamore wood and ammonium. turns it dayglo pink.
so easy to see why some places get prehistoric famous
anyone else heard of this?



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX

originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Marduk

well i have noticed people saying how conductive certain rock types are, strangely i still dont use rock in my electronics but you did leave yourself wide open with that comment. i went to the pub on the strength of it!


If you have a clock or a watch...you probably do use rock in your electronics.

Quartz is a rock and it is used to regulate timepieces and electronic firings due to it's natural piezo electric properties.


You need to make that a little clearer: Both are made up of minerals, but where a rock is a fairly disorganized mix of minerals, a crystal (like the quartz crystal) is a single compound arrainged in a lattice. Crystals "out of the ground" aren't pure enough to function in watches.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

Well...yes, one would require a good piece of Quartz to become the quartz in a 'quartz watch' for example, but nonetheless, quartz is rock being catagorised as igneous rock, but also found in metamorphic and sedimentary rocks and is among the most common of all rocks.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: MysterX

piezo electric is quartz under pressure. it produces a dc voltage, in a response. the only sort of field expedient way of creating enough force with out electricity or combustion is water hammer. we have nothing resembling this style of process. all post industrial tech has a control panel. if it is what it may be we have nothing comparable.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:29 PM
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I love the fantasy of this thread.
Even though we have evidence of who was the architect. How long it took to build. Years of construction etc etc etc.
No links. As you all should already know the story.
You're asking us to accept that this structure is not what it is said to be?
The Egyptians found it. Said f@ck it. We'll say we did it?
The inventors of these theories are as bad as the people who have destroyed and stolen the treasures.
They're just making money off the gullible.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

well i hope you forgive me for my previous tactless comments byrd but in respect to all academic types or others who post about the pyramids and regarding the interchange between byrd and mysteryx now, and please if you are familiar with physics, engineering, vocationally or theoretically please butt in.
the pyramid and its component materials have so many potential properties and combinations that make it unique
it builds a substantial static charge from wind and sun and if you didnt know that when you built it you would find out afterwards
peizo electric cant run an arc lamp
maybe it would work on that scale but only as a source of ignition like your gas fire lighter
i cant imagine how a large pulse of electricity would aid anyone
interestingly if a fluvial source produces ULF/ELF it can boost plant growth massively
so maybe the electricity angle is a misdirection and its a large greenhouse tool
just advanced agricultural enhancement
ice age tech



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: username74
so maybe the electricity angle is a misdirection and its a large greenhouse tool
just advanced agricultural enhancement
ice age tech


Yes. they were just trying to confuse people by designing it to look like a tomb and building it in the middle of a necropolis with a mortuary temple outside



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: Marduk

are you still at work?

i kinda meant, back when you said secret tomb, implying that the pyramid might be hard to hide

however maybe i might have read it wrong and its my turn to be a dumbass (not an unusual occurance)
thought it was funny tho.
what about that granite plug thing though?

edit on 30-7-2016 by username74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2016 @ 03:51 AM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Marduk

are you still at work?

i kinda meant, back when you said secret tomb, implying that the pyramid might be hard to hide

however maybe i might have read it wrong and its my turn to be a dumbass (not an unusual occurance)
thought it was funny tho.
what about that granite plug thing though?


The Granite plug is evidence that the pyramids were not a public building as it was intended to be sealed for all eternity. Little point then in having plans laying around to show tomb robbers how to tunnel in with the most efficiency.
Still, I think it turns out that on many occasions the tombs weren't robbed by locals, but by priests and masons, before it was sealed, you can't trust anyone eh



posted on Jul, 31 2016 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: Marduk

The Granite plug is evidence that the pyramids were not a public building as it was intended to be sealed for all eternity. Little point then in having plans laying around to show tomb robbers how to tunnel in with the most efficiency.
Still, I think it turns out that on many occasions the tombs weren't robbed by locals, but by priests and masons, before it was sealed, you can't trust anyone eh

wel you cant trust anyone thats just how it is

so why do we trust their records?
why would tomb raiders trust a plan?
when did game theory become productive?



posted on Jul, 31 2016 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: username74

just to clarify
you dont build a decoy passage. then hide it
behind a granite plug
and if you have a pyramid for a route to the afterlife
what does it matter what happens to the departure lounge after departure?



posted on Jul, 31 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Marduk


The Granite plug is evidence that the pyramids were not a public building

QED ?
are we willing to speculate?
think the builders didnt what it was?
if not, why not?
if it was robbed by priests then it wasnt yet sealed



posted on Jul, 31 2016 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Marduk


The Granite plug is evidence that the pyramids were not a public building

QED ?
are we willing to speculate?
think the builders didnt know what it was?
if not, why not?
if it was robbed by priests then it wasnt yet sealed



posted on Aug, 1 2016 @ 05:51 PM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Byrd

well i hope you forgive me for my previous tactless comments byrd but in respect to all academic types or others who post about the pyramids and regarding the interchange between byrd and mysteryx now, and please if you are familiar with physics, engineering, vocationally or theoretically please butt in.

I am. I've done electronics breadboarding (if that says anything to you) and have degrees and have taught. The details are boring and look a bit braggart-ish, so I won't list them.


the pyramid and its component materials have so many potential properties and combinations that make it unique

Each of the 115+ pyramids are unique in composition and physical properties, yes.


it builds a substantial static charge from wind

It does, but the charge is slight compared to the amount built up in hair, for instance in spite of the surface area. For example, on a dry and windy day, a tree in your yard could build up some static charge but it's very slight compared to what your hair builds up (or even your car.)

Your hair builds up more of a charge than the quartz crystal you buy at a rock shop or a psychic fair.


peizo electric cant run an arc lamp
maybe it would work on that scale but only as a source of ignition like your gas fire lighter


Exactly. There's undoubtedly some effect there, but because limestone and sand are more insulators than conductors, your average camel on the plateau has more of a charge than the pyramid does.


i cant imagine how a large pulse of electricity would aid anyone

Agreed. Plus, it's not directional.



posted on Aug, 1 2016 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Marduk


The Granite plug is evidence that the pyramids were not a public building

The interiors of the pyramids certainly aren't... and in fact, there were few public buildings in Egypt. Temples were for priests (the courtyards were for the people)

The interior rooms of the pyramids are pretty darn small and stuffy.


if it was robbed by priests then it wasnt yet sealed

We have some of the papyri of trial records of tomb robbers. When priests robbed, it was while the body was being prepared (swiped gold from the wrappings, etc) They didn't wait and come back.

Guards were also set around the pyramids and other types of tombs; generally the physical robbing took place more than a hundred years after the death of the owner (when people weren't being paid to guard it.)



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 11:00 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

ah well, then you will see, like me, that most of the fringe theories (involving electricity) are unworkable.
alot of this, comes from the sequence of material. because it is presented as sequencial through granite lined cavities,
limestone mass, numilitic limestone, and a cap of gold and silver alloy in a basin of water (retaining wall).
you could draw analogies to a capacitor if you wished. or they could just put lightning rod on it, which they did anyway because of the charge, hence siemens demonstration of the leyden jar up there. i will assume you and i will not be among those
the precision is precisely that, with some rather unyielding materials
and then theres all the mission creep of run off theories, that if they could create a spark then they could ignite gases
browns gas etc. and a whole slew of chemical processes are available regarding the layout of the upper two chambers and the "air shafts" (dont forget gantenbrink)
all is not as it should be for a tomb but it could have served that function (as i am sure it did)
the romans knew how to open the original door in the casing stones so if this is true then it was built with moving stone mechanisms, albeit simple ones
so maybe you should nt be to hard on the geeks out there
and the theres limestone terrain, full of water and caves and all the potential energy that represents
its almost entrappment



posted on Aug, 2 2016 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: username74
a reply to: Byrd

ah well, then you will see, like me, that most of the fringe theories (involving electricity) are unworkable.


It was something I never considered seriously, precisely because of my experience building electronics and circuits. If they'd had that sort of thing, they would have hooked up sheep rugs together (no, not kidding) to start making sparks. However, static electricity might start the occasional fire but it's not sustained enough to work large devices.




all is not as it should be for a tomb but it could have served that function (as i am sure it did)

All the pyramids (if looked at) show a development over the 1,000 year period from a basic floor plan that starts out with a simple pit and shaft grave to more elaborate chambers. Each one is unique in some way but they show a pretty consistent development.



the romans knew how to open the original door in the casing stones so if this is true then it was built with moving stone mechanisms, albeit simple ones


The "door" stones (which were actually seals) are not moveable. Robbers basically dug through the limestone to get to the chambers.


and the theres limestone terrain, full of water and caves and all the potential energy that represents
its almost entrappment


You could run such experiments at or near Giza... or go to similar places on the globe. You'd find that these ideas are still unworkable even in very similar environments.

If the idea was correct, it would have been duplicated as a functional device in many places (example - the pottery jar appears everywhere someone needs to move liquids around or store them.)



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

"It was something I never considered seriously, precisely because of my experience building electronics and circuits. If they'd had that sort of thing, they would have hooked up sheep rugs together (no, not kidding) to start making sparks. However, static electricity might start the occasional fire but it's not sustained enough to work large devices."
ah, well not so fast! although i am in accord with our basic premise here, you are at a slight disadvantage, because, wisely you have not hunted them all down on you tube, like i did

although it was a couple of years ago, and let me tell you, NASA has messed up in recruitment !
now theres only a couple, and i wont bore you with it. they just lack practical experience and veer too far into theory.
but too say it lacks the potential to do anything is a little far also
i think the extensively published use of copper was too blame for that but theres obvious reasons why.
if we take lightning example , its a braided copper wire is the lightning conductor and earth in my house and yours and theres one on the pyramid now, and that was within their capacity to fabricate.
i am not supporting it, but its remotely possible.
there is metal on gantenbrinks door.
in the sun and wind (solar solar!) that thing would develop charge, i am certainly unsure what would happen with a highly conductive capstone,and the structure set in a moat.
you could certainly hurt yourself if you built it by accident, even, start connecting this to that for whatever reason, you could fry
maybe they thought the wire had a snake in it like the reliefs

"All the pyramids (if looked at) show a development over the 1,000 year period from a basic floor plan that starts out with a simple pit and shaft grave to more elaborate chambers. Each one is unique in some way but they show a pretty consistent development."
ive looked at this and im not satisfied with my sources. i dont find i much coherent detail. i ll check out your info thread and look there

"The "door" stones (which were actually seals) are not moveable. Robbers basically dug through the limestone to get to the chambers."

ill dig out the source for you. it was a historical account or such



"You could run such experiments at or near Giza... or go to similar places on the globe. You'd find that these ideas are still unworkable even in very similar environments."
well it would be giza now and not then, so not comparative and to clarify i dont say they had electricty merely contending they were using austere or soft tech in some very developed forms that are outside our current tool kit (for obvious reason, we have hydrocarbon). mainly hydrology. mimicing conditions that have been expressed in the natural world at the end of the last ice and those that remain readily observable today. gravity, water, lithic technology, strict working protocols high motivation and lots of counter intuitive knowledge.
most of which we appear to have lost or substituted.
i find it, circumstantially, very compelling


edit on 3-8-2016 by username74 because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-8-2016 by username74 because: sorryy



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

Baghdad battery is an old invention, likely used for cleaning..



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