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Defend the term "people of color"

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posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 08:37 AM
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how about we stop using the term "white" and use instead "albino", or partial albinism, due to the rise of the theory that white people are albinos. or how about instead we stop classifying all people by shade of their skin....

in my opinion calling someone a "person of color" is a means to separate and divide..." just my opinion ... i could be wrong.




posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:02 AM
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originally posted by: kaylaluv
I'm not really understanding the point of your thread. Are you claiming that people who use the term "people of color" are racists? What about that term makes them racist? What makes you think that this makes them feel superior? Why is the term "color" superior in your mind? Why is the term "white" inferior in your mind? What makes you think that people who use the term "people of color" are trying to insult white people?


I'm saying its a divisive term intended to separate "whites" from the rest of humanity. If you watch some of these racist you tubers, they often rant about white people's complexion (or lack thereof in their minds). I sense it when I hear a person say "a person of color". As if that person has something that white people do not. It's simply a term that makes no sense and only serves to divide humanity.

For example:



And:



"toilet seat complected cave beasts"


originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: TheBulk

Perhaps we could spend less energy focusing on our skin shades, and actually consider, I dunno, saving our degrading environment? I mean here we are, in the middle of climate change issues and shortage of water and extinction of species, and the only possible thing we can do is find new ways to divide ourselves based on our skin colour?

No offence, but who cares if some guys in YouTube debate whether white skin is a colour or not? Don't we have more pressing issues as a species??



You completely missed the point. I agree, we need to get over skin color. I think most of us had, yet the self appointed guardians of "people of color" see fit to continue.
edit on 21-7-2016 by TheBulk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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originally posted by: TheBulk
This term has always bothered me. It seems to imply that human beings are separated into two groups. A group that has color, and a group that is colorless. Of course this is absurd, white people obviously do have color, when I get tan I'm darker than some light-skinned black people.

I see quite a few of you on the forums use this term and I'd like you to defend it. There are a bunch of racists on YouTube that like to make a big deal about the pigmentation of white people's skin so I just like to know if the people using the term people of color really do think they are separate from white people based on a percived superior melanin count.


Technically we are all people of color.

I guess the term is mainly for "non caucasian" people.

I'm what you would refer to as a "light skinned" black person...no, I do not feel superior to anyone because of a melanin count. We all bleed red blood, we breath the same air, we aren't different beings or separate species. That is pseudo science nonsense used by racist black people who try to paint a picture of superiority over other groups because they are darker. these same people also engage in destructive "colorism" nonsense that takes place in the black community where someone is deemed inferior because their skin is darker, and say disparaging things about light skinned/mixed black men and women because their skin is lighter. Its a bunch of nonsense.

the black people who tout melanin levels as a sign of superiority are the same as white people who view white skin as a sign of superiority. they're all ignorant.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: supremecommander

Does your statement (the contents of which I knew nothing about I might add until now) mean that the main problems come from within the black communities themselves? Do you think if such internal racism was done away with, most other forms of racism would stop too? If there is infighting and racism with each other how can they unite and stop the widening gap?
edit on 21-7-2016 by PhyllidaDavenport because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

If one is speaking specifically about a group, they tend to use some type of term to describe that group. Otherwise, how would you know who they are talking about? I mean, it wouldn't do any good to say something like "the history of that you-know-who group..." What group are they referring to?

If you have to use a term when specifically addressing that group of people, what term would you use? If you say, black, you do realize that not all of them are truly black - some are more coffee-colored, some are darker. So if you're going to get nitpicky about words, that one isn't literally correct either. If you say African-Americans, then that leaves out those who are not American.

So what term would you use if you wanted to specifically discuss that group?



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:20 AM
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originally posted by: supremecommander


Technically we are all people of color.


That's my point.




the black people who tout melanin levels as a sign of superiority are the same as white people who view white skin as a sign of superiority. they're all ignorant.


Honestly, I've not met many real racist white people in my life, but the ones that were did not care about the color of their skin. It was about other things, but not skin color.





edit on 21-7-2016 by TheBulk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:22 AM
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originally posted by: kaylaluv
a reply to: TheBulk

If one is speaking specifically about a group, they tend to use some type of term to describe that group. Otherwise, how would you know who they are talking about? I mean, it wouldn't do any good to say something like "the history of that you-know-who group..." What group are they referring to?

If you have to use a term when specifically addressing that group of people, what term would you use? If you say, black, you do realize that not all of them are truly black - some are more coffee-colored, some are darker. So if you're going to get nitpicky about words, that one isn't literally correct either. If you say African-Americans, then that leaves out those who are not American.


What are you talking about? A term for "specific groups" yet it's a blanket term used to describe any human who isn't white.


So what term would you use if you wanted to specifically discuss that group?


This isn't a specific term, at all.




edit on 21-7-2016 by TheBulk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

I have never heard a Hispanic or an Asian or a Native American Indian use the term "people of color" to describe themselves.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

We arrange ourselves into cultural groups and appearance is a big part of the identification process we all engage in. For example, "White" is also associated with a specific culture in the United States, those of European and British Isles descent. I am a white woman. I am culturally white, I look white, I act white, I identify as white. My DNA however, is not quite so white. We assign these words to cultures, and the words often center upon a specific physical trait; color is an easy identifier. If you aren't the color associated with that culture or social group you likely wouldn't be accepted by the group anyway. Shallow maybe, but inevitable.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:39 AM
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So in the last 7.5 years....
African American = Racist
Black = Racist
Nigro = Racist
People of color = Racist

White = Ok
Cracker = No big detal
Caucasian = Legit
edit on 21-7-2016 by Orionx2 because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-7-2016 by Orionx2 because: spelling



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

hmmm good point actually. I have always said that the majority of alleged "racism" isn't about the colour or the race for that matter its about many other things for example their religion, their dress, their accent etc some of the same jibes that are now considered racist when thrown at black people have been thrown at white people such as the Mormons (certinaly where I live every sunday bloody morning) goths & punks...I could go on but think you get the picture. If you're different you'll get noticed if you get noticed you'll get commented on



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: PhyllidaDavenport
a reply to: supremecommander

Does your statement (the contents of which I knew nothing about I might add until now) mean that the main problems come from within the black communities themselves? Do you think if such internal racism was done away with, most other forms of racism would stop too? If there is infighting and racism with each other how can they unite and stop the widening gap?


Are you asking if "colorism" within the black community (i.e., belief that darker or lighter skin is an advantage or makes on superior or inferior) would end, it would end outside racism towards black people? No. I don't think that would impact outer racism at all.

I do believe that colorism is one of the things that hold back "unity" within the community, but it is not as problematic as say black on black violence or other self destructive habits. Poverty, and the perpetuation of the continued cycle of poverty through sub conscious behaviors is the main problem that I see really harming the black community, or mainly inner city black americans. But there are also cultural differences within the black community in america as well...people seem to lump all of us together when we're made up of several different ethnicities and cultures. Some cultures value things like education more so than others for instance. I come from two immigrants, so my perspective and values may be different from another black person who may have been raised in a single parent home where values aren't necessarily conducive towards positive outcomes.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: kaylaluv

it happens all the time, especially online in social media.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: supremecommander

Well thanks for that I never realised that the darkness/lightness of skin colour was an issue!! If that can't be combatted then how on earth can other issues? Arghh so complex!



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: kaylaluv
a reply to: TheBulk

I have never heard a Hispanic or an Asian or a Native American Indian use the term "people of color" to describe themselves.


I have. Watch any video for a university campus concerning SJWs. NPR seems to think minorities are "people of color".

Minority Rules: Who Gets To Claim Status As A Person Of Color?

Asian Americans as People of Color and Activists for Safe Spaces

Earlier this month, The Smith Sophian, Smith College’s independent newspaper, published a piece “Rethinking Smith’s Bridge Program” by Dominica Cao ‘18 questioning the importance of the Bridge Program, a pre-orientation program for entering students of color. The writer stated that because Bridge stands for cultural inclusivity, the program should be open to white students to truly be inclusive. Without knowing the ethnicity of the writer, it’s easy to presume (as I did) that she is white and that her voice adds to white privilege and culture that demands people of color feel guilty about addressing systematic discrimination. However, upon realizing that the author is actually Asian American, I saw the piece in a different light. I saw a younger version of myself, someone who was not equipped with the vocabulary to talk about the experience of being a person of color without disturbing the façade of respectability culture surrounding race and the Asian American experience.


I'm working, so don't have time to get more, but watch any video or read any story concerning illegal immigration and you'll see plenty of references to "people of color".



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 10:34 AM
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originally posted by: redhorse
a reply to: TheBulk

We arrange ourselves into cultural groups and appearance is a big part of the identification process we all engage in. For example, "White" is also associated with a specific culture in the United States, those of European and British Isles descent. I am a white woman. I am culturally white, I look white, I act white, I identify as white. My DNA however, is not quite so white. We assign these words to cultures, and the words often center upon a specific physical trait; color is an easy identifier. If you aren't the color associated with that culture or social group you likely wouldn't be accepted by the group anyway. Shallow maybe, but inevitable.



That's all fine. I'm talking about this term that separates whites from everyone else, implying we're somehow different from the rest.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

I don't get it either, we all have color, I have never seen somebody with transparent skin.

everytime my best friend talks about "people of color" I start laughing at her and tell her that we all have color.

Another term that gets me is African American heck if you are born in the US you are an American plain and simple, that is what you are, I am latina born American, I am an American.

I tell you, people do anything in order to keep racism and prejudice alive so they can complain about something.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: TheBulk

I'm not defending anything, nor do I use it, but when the NAACP has a similar term contained within its name, what do you expect everyone else to do about the term if that organization still wears the moniker proudly?



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: TheBulk

originally posted by: redhorse
a reply to: TheBulk

We arrange ourselves into cultural groups and appearance is a big part of the identification process we all engage in. For example, "White" is also associated with a specific culture in the United States, those of European and British Isles descent. I am a white woman. I am culturally white, I look white, I act white, I identify as white. My DNA however, is not quite so white. We assign these words to cultures, and the words often center upon a specific physical trait; color is an easy identifier. If you aren't the color associated with that culture or social group you likely wouldn't be accepted by the group anyway. Shallow maybe, but inevitable.




That's all fine. I'm talking about this term that separates whites from everyone else, implying we're somehow different from the rest.



Well, "white" is an umbrella term that encompasses a lot of people, and "people of color" tends to be socially applied to people of African descent, but I have seen it used in a broader sense. It used to be more of an umbrella term as well but it has become more specific to one group. That's true.

I guess if you are just making a semantic argument then you are technically correct. We all have color, but I don't find that term any more or less supportable than white, or any other term used to describe a culture or race based upon skin tone. If you are hung up on the technical meaning of the phrase then you have plenty of company; although, I am suspicious of people that make semantic arguments when it comes to largely social phenomenon. They usually have an agenda which is contributing to the myopic perspective.

For the record, I believe that we ARE all different from each other, that there are different races. Socially, over time that is inevitable and over enough time, genetically it is inevitable as well. Not better or worse mind you, just different.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 01:27 PM
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I think this guy at Diveristy has a good take on the issue:


In my opinion, “people of color” is an effective way to describe non-white people in the United States. One can correctly argue that “white” people are people of color, or that some Latinos are white; however, unless the goal is to endlessly argue semantics, it’s more useful to use a common phrase to describe people who are commonly thought of as not being white by the white majority in this country.



I’ve heard endless arguments from progressive people about nomenclature. It’s tiresome, boring and counterproductive. You can call it diversity or inclusion or popcorn—as soon as the bigots figure out the code, they’re going to denigrate the word. By sticking to standard phraseology, we keep the discussion pointed toward progress rather than log rolling ourselves into irrelevance.


It's a real short piece. Read it all.

www.diversityinc.com...



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