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Planet sized objects moving at 99.9% the speed of light

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posted on Jan, 24 2005 @ 02:35 PM
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I'm going to have to suggest that since the fastest of these particles they're detecting/observing are moving at 19.99999999999999999999% the speed of light, that something else entirely is happening here to many of the particles. There are many theories on what would happen if matter were to exceed (or just reach) the speed of light. Perhaps the ones they're observing are only a certain percentage of the particles that were accelerated by these forces... perhaps some actually exceeded or reached the speed of light and.........

1.) shot through time? and therefore are no longer able to be seen.
2.) turned into energy and are therefore being observed, but not as matter (since they're now energy) and therefore aren't being noticed.
3.) shot through space like a bullet and came out somewhere else in the universe. (perhaps a source of wormholes??? **shruggs**).
4.) are simply no longer visible or detectable
5.) were transformed into some other form (no longer matter or energy, but something else alltogether that can not be seen or detected... and since we can't know anything about something we can't see or detect, then we'll never know with the tech we've got now anyway).

We could be talking in the realm of the absolutely unknown here... so it's hard to speculate... and yet the possibilities seem endless.

But this does seem to shove a foot in the mouths of all the jerks who've tried to argue with me saying there wasn't enough energy in the entire universe to accelerate even one atom to 99% the speed of light... HAHAHAHA!




posted on Jan, 24 2005 @ 03:15 PM
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Suppose a jupiter sized blazar blob meet another blazar blob in opposite direction , that would be some fireworks.... Some very exotic states of matter might be created not seen since the day of the big bang....

Probably also many small black holes would be formed, but because they are too smal to make up for losses by quantum tunnelingl, they would exponantially evaporate in a huge Gamma flash and a gravity ripple in space-time???


[edit on 24-1-2005 by Countermeasures]



posted on Apr, 15 2005 @ 12:12 AM
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Please forgive any protocol breaches, I'm a newbie here.

It seems to me that some of the discrepancies between currently accepted theories and observed phenomena could mean that our foundation may not be quite as solid as we think.

The most likely fatal flaw I see is that we have decided what the physics of the entire universe are based on what we can observe/verify here on Earth. Stick a long pencil in a short glass of water. From the outside we can see how the part of the pencil in the water looks different than the part extending above the water. Imagine Earth is an atom somewhere on the surface of the submerged portion of the pencil. From the outside we can see how different the two environments are.

I think that inside the glass the speed of light is consistently 186,000. I don't think the folks who exist entirely within the glass can be expected to know how it behaves outside the glass.

I have no idea whether the glass represents the solar system or milky way galaxy. I do have a strong sense that we are on the inside looking out.

Also, within the glass the basic speed limit is 186,000. This is because atoms basic components operate at that pace. If you made them go that fast (in this environment) they would become disorganized / unstable / disintegrate. If you want to travel faster than 186,000 in this environment (hey - what's your hurry?) you'll need to develop/discover a material/field that doesn't rely on matter as we know it to coat/contain your ship.



posted on Apr, 15 2005 @ 03:09 AM
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.
key word in phrase, 'Jupiter sized blobs . . .'

the variance of density per volume is unimaginable
black holes with many solar masses shrink down to very small sizes.
conversely a cloud of gas could have extremely low density.

It doesn't specifically state something with the MASS of Jupiter.

The fact that any amount of matter is being accelerated to very near the speed of light is still remarkable.

Electrons in lightning on Earth are accelerated to very close to the speed of light, emiting gamma rays.

If something is traveling this close to the speed of light and it travels straight across your field of vision would you even see it? Close up Im sure you wouldn't, but from a distance would it even be distinguishable from stray light rays?
.



posted on Apr, 16 2005 @ 02:45 AM
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Just for the sake of my intuition, I'm going to assume that it is possible for matter to go faster than light. Now I have to reason out why it is that we cannot detect it.

I'm using the Sun.

When matter gives off light, it is not done in a continuous stream. Individual atoms within the sun give off singular or grouped photons intermittently. There is a time gap between each burst of light radiation on a quantum level. On a macro level, so much radiation is being given off by the sun that we cannot discriminate between the random timings of bursts--it all appears continuous.

The sun is O, and the other marks are various photons (the sun is moving down screen at its normal speed):
O;'-:'_'',
O;'-:'_'',
O;'-:'_'',

But if the sun is moving fast enough, fewer photons are released from each position the sun is in (in the same sequence of marks):
O;'-:
O'_",
O;'-:
O'_",

Go fast enough it becomes
O;
O'
O-
O:

At that point I think it would be invisible to us. But I'm just thinking aloud--this has more to do with the frequency of bursts than with light's actual velocity.



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