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'Absolutely Wrong': Bill Nye the Science Guy Takes on Noah's Ark Exhibit

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posted on Jul, 17 2016 @ 11:50 PM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
And entrance to this spectacle??? Costs FORTY DOLLARS.

USD $40


Disney starts at $105.00 for a one day pass just to the magic kingdom. No epcot.




posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 12:47 AM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: Justso


You can seldom share your beliefs with others here unless you drink the kool-aid. Even at the schools. Can't wait to move. Can't believe anyone taking this ark seriously but I know all the churches around here have rented the buses and are sold out in tickets. Scary.


That is scary, indeed. Should have ceased by now!!!

So sad. Earlier today I was listening to documentaries, and one was about the "Ancient Astronauts" theory. I can actually relate to that theory. I can NOT accept Ham's "Answers In Genesis" as anything but nonsense.

My kids are 25 and 27 now - we watched Bill Nye The Science Guy on TV when they were preschoolers!!
Thank God for Bill Nye. lol


Aren't you just swapping one indoctrination for another. Sunday mornings in Sunday school or Saturday morning TV time on the couch.

Both Ken and Bill are entertainers, desperate for attention. Bill has done a better job branding himself, and for Ken what a better way to promot your new attraction than with some controversy, anything to get the cameras out there. It's marketing folks, Looks like it's working.
edit on 18-7-2016 by Observationalist because: Spelling



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 12:55 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

If that amusement park's construction was heavily influenced by Kentucky's governor's (or the governor of the state in which the amusement park you visited) very own literal interpretation of the bible, amongst several other high-profile Kentucky politicians, you may have pause for concern about kids learning science with ghost trains. Moreover, did the amusement park you visited receive substantial tax relief based on being a tax-exempt religious endeavor?

You'd be concerned about children wholesale swallowing the belief about ghosts who may forever question science because of that experience - children are gullible and even more impressionable. It's of particular concern in this case with this being a museum proffering religious indoctrination under the auspices of a revenue-generating 'amusement park'. This museum/amusement park's explicit goal is to teach young children that the earth is only several millennia old and by the saving grace of God - using Noah and his ark - the flora and fauna of today's world came from the bowels of a 541-foot ark. By all means, visit theme/amusement parks for your leisure, but don't pretend this is a run-of-the-mill amusement park designed to entertain and make children happy; this is a means of telling blatant lies to gullible children to undermine their critical thinking skills and further a religious agenda. Period.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 12:58 AM
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originally posted by: Justso
Where I live-in the deep south-this kind of indoctrination goes on 24/7. You can't open a Chik fil-a franchise unless you have been totally indoctrinated and they close on Sundays. You can seldom share your beliefs with others here unless you drink the kool-aid. Even at the schools. Can't wait to move. Can't believe anyone taking this ark seriously but I know all the churches around here have rented the buses and are sold out in tickets. Scary.


Where the heck do you live, I have spent 38 years in Oklahoma to as far south as Tampa Florida... I have never been overly religious, never had a problem talking about my beliefs.. My wife was born in Louisiana, and raised in Arkansas as a pagan, she has never had a problem.

Yes Chikfila is religious, also cheap to open in comparison to other fast food franchises, and is a largely hands off company...corporate actually said the franchise that opened on the Sunday after the Orlando shooting to get food and drink to people looking to donate blood did the right thing...

(the following is a general statement) While I disagree with the Ark and that level of religious indoctrination, the vast majority of churches and people are pretty bloody tolerant... I lived in the bible belt for a decade as a lapsed catholic married to a witch...never had a problem.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 01:06 AM
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At 40 bucks a pop, I would think he's going to run out of paying customers real fast, given the state of the economy in Kentucky.

And are those parents planning on keeping their children away from the internet permanently? My own kids were rather mad at me when they figured out Santa Claus was a hoax, you should see the angst and anger over on the sub-Reddit for atheism, on the part of the kids who have just figured out their parents are idiots and now they have to relearn everything they've ever been told, as well as guiltily worry about the ramifications (in case they're wrong and God is vengeful), not to mention the rift it causes between the adult children and the parents.

Religious indoctrination is cruel. If everyone's mind was left alone until they hit adulthood to make a decision at that point, almost all religion would die out in a few decades. Only a young mind can be permanently confused like that. Everyone else would laugh at the mere notion of some of this stuff.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: Observationalist

It simply is not accurate to say, that one is either indoctrinated by ones television, or by one or another religious organisation or insane fundamentalist.

One has command of but one useful thing in this world, no matter how powerful or powerless one may be. Ones own self. A person CAN chose not to accept programming, can chose to have a relationship with Christ, without taking Ken Ham or a thousand or more idiots like him, seriously.

Those who do not take up their responsibility, both to themselves and the species of which they are a part, to love Christ and become wise, rather than to be made a drone which absorbs propaganda and spits out fundamentalism, are not in service to Christ when they make that free will choice. And believe you me, it IS a choice. I know this, because I had to make it for myself when I was just a child.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 01:17 AM
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originally posted by: Observationalist

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: Justso


You can seldom share your beliefs with others here unless you drink the kool-aid. Even at the schools. Can't wait to move. Can't believe anyone taking this ark seriously but I know all the churches around here have rented the buses and are sold out in tickets. Scary.


That is scary, indeed. Should have ceased by now!!!

So sad. Earlier today I was listening to documentaries, and one was about the "Ancient Astronauts" theory. I can actually relate to that theory. I can NOT accept Ham's "Answers In Genesis" as anything but nonsense.

My kids are 25 and 27 now - we watched Bill Nye The Science Guy on TV when they were preschoolers!!
Thank God for Bill Nye. lol


Aren't you just swapping one indoctrination for another. Sunday mornings in Sunday school or Saturday morning TV time on the couch.

Both Ken and Bill are entertainers, desperate for attention. Bill has done a better job branding himself, and for Ken what a better way to promot your new attraction than with some controversy, anything to get the cameras out there. It's marketing folks, Looks like it's working.


Maybe you're right, Bill may simply be an entertainer with one goal in mind: indoctrination of kids with science for money. But, at least, Bill has science on his side and, if in his endless efforts to promote his indoctrination of kids through science entertainment, some one (i.e. a respected, unbiased researcher/scientist) would quickly point out the errors of his science indoctrination by proving him wrong with fundamental, sound reasoning backed by peer-reviewed published science.

Ken Hamm's indoctrination can't be scrutinized the same, as faith/belief cannot be deduced through scientific reasoning/methodology. Big, big difference. So big is the ability to escape scrutiny that a debate over the age of the world was the impetus to the whole shebang created in Kentucky. Where are the debates between geologists and other disciplines of the natural sciences where one argues an age of 6,000 years and the other 4.5 billion years? The only ones I know of are religious zealots who possess degrees in communications passing themselves off as published researchers.

Bye Nye isn't in it for the money or the indoctrination - won't deny he's more than happy to bring attention to himself, but who doesn't when their plied trade essentially requires attention-seeking - but simply in it because he's a nerd who loves science, loves the fact his job is what it is, and genuinely seems to like bringing real science into children's homes.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Jewish tradition states that Noah took stones on the ark. These stones glowed lightly in the day and brightly at night. They had the effect of heat, calming the animals and preservation of food. No fires were ever on the ark and feeding at night no problem. It seems a stone like it was used in Solomon's ring (of power). The ring, ark and the ark of the covenent. Were types of Christ that transfigered as light inside out.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: Markafeller

Cool, magic stones. Where can I get one?



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
And entrance to this spectacle??? Costs FORTY DOLLARS.

USD $40


Disney starts at $105.00 for a one day pass just to the magic kingdom. No epcot.


WOW! Really?

I remember when the first Disneyland opened. Didn't go to the opening, but shortly after.

It seemed expensive then.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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a reply to: Annee

I grew up down the road from Disney world, I remember 20 bones to enter during the off season for Florida residents... last time I went they were offering deep discounts for active duty folks still ran 60 per person... its nuts.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 02:11 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: Annee

I grew up down the road from Disney world, I remember 20 bones to enter during the off season for Florida residents... last time I went they were offering deep discounts for active duty folks still ran 60 per person... its nuts.


Cool, but I'm talking about the Original Disneyland in Anaheim.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 02:15 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

My point was directed to Buzz Wings comment about her Kids watching TV.

To me both systems media and the church are like nests for young minds, both can have a significant influence positive or negative on ones Idea of origins. TV says it cooler and with a funny guy in a bow tie, so I'll go with that. Or my mom made me memorize these bible verses so I could win some candy.

There is no doubt a battle for our children's mind, so being able to discern when one is truly learning or being force fead is an import gift, one that I pray my kids will develop.

I agree it's our responsibility to choose wisdom. Our paths are sometimes chosen for us with parents teachers or what ever propping up our minds. But at some point we move on our own terms, and being able to sort what was real and what was false is part of the journey to wisdom, a journey that never stops.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 03:32 AM
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originally posted by: BeefNoMeat
a reply to: chr0naut

If that amusement park's construction was heavily influenced by Kentucky's governor's (or the governor of the state in which the amusement park you visited) very own literal interpretation of the bible, amongst several other high-profile Kentucky politicians, you may have pause for concern about kids learning science with ghost trains. Moreover, did the amusement park you visited receive substantial tax relief based on being a tax-exempt religious endeavor?

You'd be concerned about children wholesale swallowing the belief about ghosts who may forever question science because of that experience - children are gullible and even more impressionable. It's of particular concern in this case with this being a museum proffering religious indoctrination under the auspices of a revenue-generating 'amusement park'. This museum/amusement park's explicit goal is to teach young children that the earth is only several millennia old and by the saving grace of God - using Noah and his ark - the flora and fauna of today's world came from the bowels of a 541-foot ark. By all means, visit theme/amusement parks for your leisure, but don't pretend this is a run-of-the-mill amusement park designed to entertain and make children happy; this is a means of telling blatant lies to gullible children to undermine their critical thinking skills and further a religious agenda. Period.


So, they visit a theme park, so what.

The get 'educated' in school that Creationism isn't true.

And they are told there that science somehow supplants other areas of knowledge (like philosophy, history, ethics and religion).

The truth is that science has a very limited scope of application and barely touches on other branches of learning. Ridiculing religious texts for not having scientific descriptions of physical processes is like ridiculing the works of Shakespeare for not having anything about engine maintenance of a 1989 Volvo.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 04:02 AM
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a reply to: BeefNoMeat


He's not even a scientist. He is a mechanical engineer

My issue isn't so much with that, as the fact as he and the rest of the media pass him off as an end all be all

The guy doesn't have anywhere near the credentials of someone like Neil degrasse Tyson (sp), and yet he's lauded as a mental giant in the media as a science guru

Simply put, this guys hubris is entirely out of control



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 05:03 AM
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originally posted by: Klassified
a reply to: BuzzyWigs
Someone once said the story of Noah and the ark was real, but was actually an alien vessel, and Noah was its commander who spent much time gathering the DNA of every species on earth, including humans, in preparation for an ELE the aliens couldn't prevent. It was quite an imaginative tale, but I would believe that fairy tale, before I ever believed the biblical version.



That theory I can relate to, brilliant!



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: BeefNoMeat


this is a means of telling blatant lies to gullible children to undermine their critical thinking skills and further a religious agenda. Period.


Yep! Exactly. I think it should not be happening. But it is.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 08:16 AM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

I doubt Tyson would have any different opinion. Plus, Nye had a kid's show for years....and since we're talking about the indoctrination of little children into a pack of lies, it seems appropriate.

Sagan and Tyson and Hawking and Kaku would all agree and insist that this is a preposterous bit of abusive brainwashing.



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

And I think bill nye is a brain washer, go figure
Do you have anything nice to say ever buzz

No one is asking you to believe, no one is forcing it on you, you can drive right on by, no strings
I believe it's a great attraction teaching Christians about the ark, sorry you are so anti Christian, so hate filled that you can't live and let live

I kind of wonder about people who can't live and let live



posted on Jul, 18 2016 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: Annee

That's their basic basic plan.
Epcot or animal kingdom are another 100.each or $50.00 each if you combine.
But if you go for seven days it's only $52.00 per day.
There are sites that offer up to 60% off. The $105.00 is full price .



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