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EXCLUSIVE: Veteran Dallas cop breaks ranks (truncated)

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posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 12:55 PM
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So much media and political attention has been focused like a laser on race in general, and the BLM in specific, that very real and serious issues with our law enforcement agencies has been completely glossed over -- if not ignored completely. This long-time Dallas PD officer explains many of those issues very clearly and succinctly. While it is very trendy these days to condemn and vilify anyone who dares breathe a word of criticism against Law Enforcement, it's symbolism over substance if we also refuse to pay attention when they, themselves, say, "Hey! We have some problems!!!" There is a very big difference between anti-police and anti-police corruption or anti-police brutality.

Full title at link: EXCLUSIVE: Veteran Dallas cop breaks ranks to slam 'public face of togetherness' and claim black community mistrusts police because they are WRONGLY arrested to help fill arrest 'quotas'


Officer Nick Novello, 62, who is a serving officer with 34 years on the beat in Dallas... he joined the Dallas Police Department as a park and recreation officer... made the transition to 'beat cop' patrolling East Dallas neighborhoods... no intention of climbing the ranks... [past] spokesman for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, or LEAP, a group of current and former law enforcement members who say that existing drug policies have failed.


Officer Novello is very clear regarding his high respect and esteem for his fellow officers:


"I am not talking about the rank and file officers who do fantastic jobs knowing their lives are in continual danger and that each time they go to work, they may not come home"


Instead of quoting extensively from the article, I've tried to summarize his main points:

Regarding Chief Brown: -- defied calls from four police associations in Dallas to resign last spring -- failing the public by being at the helm of a police team low on morale and over worked with insufficient pay -- guilty of 'grandstanding' in his public appeal to hire more young black men to his force -- several officers had resigned from the force after last Thursday's murders --

Police Misconduct: -- "Not only can't we police ourselves, sometimes we go out of our way to protect the predator cop."

Low Morale: -- underpaid by $15,000 -- understaffed -- no transfer-in policy -- -- plunged into an all time low with many disillusioned officers serving the public -- a lot of bad feeling [from officers] behind the scenes -- Last month lost 48-50 officers --

Quotas: Officers under pressure to reach targets -- end to the arrest and ticket quota -- "In my estimation the quota system is corrupt. You are telling the officer who has a great deal of power that he is required to exercise that and generate funds for the city. Arrests generate money" --

Whistleblower Retaliation: -- several legal run ins after being accused of whistle blowing -- better legal assistance for Dallas officers who life the lid on corrupt officers -- -- [Novello is] driven by the need to expose the truth and serve the public with his deeply religious beliefs spurring him on

Young Blacks: -- large numbers of the black community distrust police -- wrongly arrested to help fulfill an arrest 'quota' -- stop criminalizing them for things like having small amounts of marijuana -- 'Some officers fit people up by arresting them for being intoxicated when they refuse to show their IDs and that leads to a criminal record and difficulties in finding a job --

I am impressed with this officer's thoughtful, reasonable and respectful approach to the problems he and so many other law enforcement officers face every day. He addresses the issues well, without making it personal or hateful:


'I don't want to besmirch the man and I have nothing personal against him. I harbor no anger at him.

'He says he wants to hug officers when he sees them. Well, I would hug him back I suppose.

'But I have no confidence in the man at all. He is very dictatorial. He is not open to questions. It is his show.'


I hope his concerns get the attention they deserve, for everyone's sake.




posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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And soon, they'll all be quietly fired... or jailed.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

nope.

this is the vicious cycle. exposure is only step 1 of a multi step resolution to this behavior.


im also glad to see this article was published in an international outlet. another great way to get exposure, right.

and according to many members police bias is just a 'myth'...



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: odzeandennz

I don't think police bias is a myth I think without a doubt there is racist people everywhere but by no means do I think every single department in the country deploys the same tactics.

It's like Muslims.

They are not all bad it's specific brands of Islam we have to worry about like the Wahhabist and Sunni clerics and Salifas.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:18 PM
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Chief Brown, not unlike 0bama, is a race-promoter.

I don't really have much of a problem with that. That's because I understand. The last job I applied for I didn't get. I know for a fact, I was the most qualified person for that job on the face of this planet. I know this, because I was the last person to hold that position, and I successfully steered a course with it for almost five years.

Why didn't I get it (back)? Because it was "time" for a minority to have it. Well ... they can't find a minority qualified to any standard to take it. The hilarity: they can't offer it to me now ... so it goes unfilled. LMFAO

Anyway ... Chief Brown is the wrong guy in that job. What's pathetic, is that there are probably dozens of people suitable and more qualified than he is. But, he's protected from criticism (that could get him relieved) simply because of the color of his skin.

Twelve officers were shot. Five of them are dead (Benghazi anyone?). Calls for his resignation ... crickets ... and now a chirp.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: lordcomac
And soon, they'll all be quietly fired... or jailed.


If their "betters" have their way they sure will!

Law enforcement needs the public's support... but not the "rah! rah! sis boom bah!!!" type support. Real support that addresses their very real concerns.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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originally posted by: Boadicea
...
There is a very big difference between anti-police and anti-police corruption or anti-police brutality.
...


The above is the most important part of your post.

You bring up some very important points. As I have mentioned previously, I believe that most law enforcement are good people with good intentions doing a very difficult, dangerous job. There are however some who seek the out the job because they like power. And sometimes years of having that kind of power can affect some people. And there is the problem of officers covering for other officers who do the wrong thing.

However, I don't really agree with the suggestion that the main issue is with victimizing blacks. I'm sure there are some who are racist, just as with the rest of the population, but I am not convinced that racism within law enforcement is the major issue.

For example, there is a small town near us where all young people know to be very cautious. The law enforcement there seem to be thugs, with a thug as their police chief. They target teens, pulling them over for bogus reasons and forcing them into searches that are most likely illegal. But this is not directed at any particular race. They treat all the same. The citizens in that town even call them the "mafia". If you are liked by the police, you are fine. If you get on their naughty list for any reason, expect to be harassed. They are also heavy with the traffic violations, likely to meet quotas.
Regarding the above town - the bizarre part is there was a guy who ran for mayor, basing his platform on cleaning up the police department. While he was running, his son got a DUI in that town, pulled over just for revving his engine. This guy still got elected. The police constantly gave him a hard time. The mayor had to file lawsuits to get access to the police department and police department records, because the chief locked him out. The judge decided the mayor is their boss, and the chief did not like that one bit. Luckily, that police chief has been recently replaced, and things need to be eased up.

ETA: Adding one link as reference in a long years-long saga:
Appeals court sides with Macungie mayor in police dispute

So, certainly there is corruption. But THAT should be the target of public outcry, not racism. And the public outcry should find peaceful, legal ways to fight back, such as electing officials who will clean up the problems. The answer is not inciting riots, or inciting people to kill law enforcement officers.

.
edit on 7/16/16 by BlueAjah because: moved a sentence to clarify timeline

edit on 7/16/16 by BlueAjah because: added link



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

From now on, I'm just going to hold police to the same standards as politicians.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: BlueAjah

Very wise words!!! Thank you for sharing them here


Racism is "a" problem -- not the only problem, not even necessarily the biggest problem. That probably varies in degree from department to department. And it's a crying shame that so much attention is focused on racism to a ridiculous degree, while legitimate concerns and issues are left by the wayside.

Studies have shown that within a department, a very few officers are responsible for the vast majority of complaints, lawsuits and settlements. The vast majority of LEOs serve the public to the absolute best of their ability and integrity. They became LEOs for all the right reasons, and they shine like a beacon. But such power is also a magnet for the power hungry and corrupt. Those are the officers and administrators that cause all the problems.

A "good" cop is worth their weight in gold... but a "bad" cop causes immeasurable harm and gives every cop a bad name.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: Boadicea

From now on, I'm just going to hold police to the same standards as politicians.


Hmmmm... I can take that lots of ways. Perhaps you'd care to expand?



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: Boadicea

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: Boadicea

From now on, I'm just going to hold police to the same standards as politicians.


Hmmmm... I can take that lots of ways. Perhaps you'd care to expand?


We can't hold politicians to the same standards as the police, so why not hold police to the same standards as politicians.

So what if they lie, steal, kill, are biased or bigoted?

Why should we hold police to some mythical standard that we don't live by and as sure as hell, politicians don't live by.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Okay, gotcha. Very disappointing... but gotcha.

I know we can do better.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: Boadicea
a reply to: DBCowboy

Okay, gotcha. Very disappointing... but gotcha.

I know we can do better.


The point is, we don't do better.

Not in our society, not by our leaders.


Yet we demand that police be held so some elevated standard.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 01:55 PM
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The corruption is not just in big cities, and it is not just racism.

In the same small town mentioned above:

Every day you would see trucks pulled over. The borough made at least $120,000 annually from truckers who did not follow a rule about not driving on a certain road. There were only 2 signs on each end of this banned road - one falling over and almost invisible behind a pole, and the other at a point beyond where there was any safe place for truckers to turn around. Many truckers tried to fight tickets. The LEO claimed that they were only enforcing a rule for public safety.

The same mayor mentioned above, after he was in office, asked the DOT to post new, very visible signs. They did this quickly - they just needed to be informed and asked. After this, income from tickets dropped to $1,000 per month. The LEO can't claim that they did not know how to fix this, but they did not want to lose the money.

[url=http://articles.mcall.com/2011-11-19/news/mc-macungie-route-100-trucks-20111119_1_truck-fines-borough-manager-chris-boehm-truck-drivers]source[/u rl]


edit on 7/16/16 by BlueAjah because: missed word

edit on 7/16/16 by BlueAjah because: fixed link



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Yes, we can... many of us do. And thank heavens for that, because if everyone took your cue and chose to do nothing, God only knows how much worse things would be.

Instead, many -- perhaps even most -- choose to live to a higher standard, encouraging and inspiring others to do the same every day, and demand that same standard from our government officials.

Our sung and unsung heroes.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

We can't hold politicians to the same standards as the police, so why not hold police to the same standards as politicians.

So what if they lie, steal, kill, are biased or bigoted?

Why should we hold police to some mythical standard that we don't live by and as sure as hell, politicians don't live by.


Because the rest of us are forced to live by those standards and are punished for not doing so. The same is supposed to apply to them as well. Equal under the Law means just that.

I'm pretty sure you're forced to live by those standards or be punished for it, right??? So why let others off???



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Ideally, you are right.

We should all be held to high standards. Not just police and politicians.

But I am sickened by the pass politicians get BY people, yet the same people who excuse politicians, hold police to high standards.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 02:13 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
The point is, we don't do better.

Not in our society, not by our leaders.


Yet we demand that police be held so some elevated standard.


Because they have a elevated position which demands a higher standard.

I expect someone who cooks my food to not spit in it or drop it on the floor and serve it too me too because of their position. I expect my mechanic to know more about fixing my car and to do it better than me too.

Different positions require different standards of conduct.

They aren't forced in to those positions. They agree to them. They can leave if they can't handle it.



posted on Jul, 16 2016 @ 02:48 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: Boadicea

Ideally, you are right.

We should all be held to high standards. Not just police and politicians.

But I am sickened by the pass politicians get BY people, yet the same people who excuse politicians, hold police to high standards.


I agree. Even better, we should all hold ourselves to high standards.... if we did, we wouldn't need law enforcement and we wouldn't have to be our brother's keeper.

I don't know what to say about those "who excuse politicians" but "hold police to high standards." I have no faith or trust in any politician of any party, so I'm clueless! But I can say one of the biggest reasons I want to hold police to high standards is because the ones who hold themselves to high standards don't deserve to be tarnished with the same broad brush as those who have no standards.



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