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Deepest View Ever of the Orion Nebula Reveals Hidden Objects

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posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 10:05 AM
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The image was captured by the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Very Large Telescope in Chile and offers the deepest view yet into the Orion Nebula , it has also shown astronomers an unexpectedly high proportion of very-low-mass objects or planets hidden within the cloud of dust and gas.

This new image has caused excitement because it reveals a unexpected wealth of very-low-mass objects, which in turn suggests that the Orion Nebula may be forming proportionally far more low-mass objects than closer and less active star formation regions.

Astronomers count up how many objects of different masses form in regions like the Orion Nebula to try to understand the star-formation process [3]. Before this research the greatest number of objects were found with masses of about one quarter that of our Sun. The discovery of a plethora of new objects with masses far lower than this in the Orion Nebula has now created a second maximum at a much lower mass in the distribution of star counts.

These observations also hint tantalisingly that the number of planet-sized objects might be far greater than previously thought. Whilst the technology to readily observe these objects does not exist yet, ESO’s future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), scheduled to begin operations in 2024, is designed to pursue this as one of its goals.

Lead scientist Holger Drass (Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile) enthuses: “Our result feels to me like a glimpse into a new era of planet and star formation science. The huge number of free-floating planets at our current observational limit is giving me hope that we will discover a wealth of smaller Earth-sized planets with the E-ELT.”
www.eso.org...



We really are experiencing a Golden age of discovery at the moment which with new equipment waiting to come online within the next few years will continue to expand our knowledge of the Universe and our place within in it further more.


edit on 13-7-2016 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 10:10 AM
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Fantastic picture. I remember seeing the Nebula for the first time without any telescope in the sticks of Tennessee. Makes you appreciate the country and absence of light pollution. Thanks for posting this.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Disclosure drip.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 10:57 AM
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I find it fascinating that those people who lived before our time held the universe to be infinite, yet infinite was just a mental calculation for size that was beyond human comprehension, a simple way of labeling the extent of ''biggness".

Now though, we are glimpsing just how freaking huge what our imagination only guessed at really is.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Lovely picture!

I have a doubt though. hopefully somebody can explain where I am going wrong.

From what I understand, planetary detection is based, basically, on two methods: "Wobble" caused by gravitational effects on stars; Changes in light caused by planetary transit past stars.

How then are these low mass objects detected? When they talk about the most common, quarter mass objects, are we to assume red dwarf or similar stars? If so then light could be the factor enabling detection, so no problem there. And if that is the case, are these much lower mass objects now mentioned super Jupiter type objects? There should surely be no light from these. How are they detected? They also talk about a hypothetical overabundance of Earth-sized free standing objects, how could they ever be detected if they are free standing?

Am I missing something completely obvious?

Another question: Are they saying that the new E-ELT will have the power to resolve free standing, Earth sized planetary bodies 1,300+ light years away?

If that is the case colour me impressed!




posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: Jonjonj

And if that is the case, are these much lower mass objects now mentioned super Jupiter type objects?
Jupiter is 0.001 solar mass. That is significantly less than 0.25 solar mass but the objects found are quite a bit larger than Jupiter. They are also young and hot because stellar (and planetary) formation is happening in Orion as we speak.
From 2000:

The new infrared survey of the Trapezium Cluster in the Orion Nebula, turned up 13 objects below the 13 Jupiter-mass threshold. The mass of the smallest is equivalent to no more than about 8 Jupiters. These objects have been dubbed "free-floating planets". They give off only residual heat left over from when they were born.
www.spaceref.com...


They also talk about a hypothetical overabundance of Earth-sized free standing objects, how could they ever be detected if they are free standing?
I don't see a statement regarding an overabundance of Earth-Sized (or any sized) free standing objects.


Another question: Are they saying that the new E-ELT will have the power to resolve free standing, Earth sized planetary bodies 1,300+ light years away?
No they are not saying that. But they are hoping that the new instrument will enable the detection of "rogue" bodies which are smaller than any yet found, maybe even Earth sized. But it is not talking about finding them in Orion.

edit on 7/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Thank you for the reply.

I get the super Jupiter idea. So they are detected by heat signatures? Ok, cool.

Regarding the Earth sized planet detection, I never said they had been detected, or never meant to, I was referring to what the article states here:


: “Our result feels to me like a glimpse into a new era of planet and star formation science. The huge number of free-floating planets at our current observational limit is giving me hope that we will discover a wealth of smaller Earth-sized planets with the E-ELT.”


How could they be detected, is the telescope going to be that good?




posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: NewzNose




Disclosure drip.


Not everything space related has to do with disclosure...this being one of them.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: Phage

Thank you for the reply.

I get the super Jupiter idea. So they are detected by heat signatures? Ok, cool.

Regarding the Earth sized planet detection, I never said they had been detected, or never meant to, I was referring to what the article states here:


: “Our result feels to me like a glimpse into a new era of planet and star formation science. The huge number of free-floating planets at our current observational limit is giving me hope that we will discover a wealth of smaller Earth-sized planets with the E-ELT.”


How could they be detected, is the telescope going to be that good?


They seem to think it will be. He is saying that, if the large ones can be found in Orion with what we have now, the chances of finding small ones closer is better with a better tool.

edit on 7/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: Jonjonj




How could they be detected, is the telescope going to be that good?


Let's hope it is...imagine the possibilities of being able to detect them, we can't get to them, but it is interesting to know they are there.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:14 PM
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Has anyone got a link of the highres of that pic?



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:21 PM
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originally posted by: Dumbass
Has anyone got a link of the highres of that pic?


Full versions Here

The full size original is 1.1gb

JPEG is 57 mb



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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This image looks suspiciously clear for an earth-based telescope.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 12:59 PM
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originally posted by: gortex

originally posted by: Dumbass
Has anyone got a link of the highres of that pic?


Full versions Here

The full size original is 1.1gb

JPEG is 57 mb


Thanks! Much appreciated



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

The picture is made up of infrared images not visible light , using infrared they can see through the clouds of dust and gas plus we get a clearer image.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: gortex

I value these types of threads. I just wish we could get even further. You'd think with the space programs we have today, we could.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: LSU0408

We have a habit of moving forward then taking a step back , we had a supersonic passenger plane then scraped it without a replacement then we had a space plane and scrapped it without a replacement .... sometimes we're really dumb.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

I noticed that as well...



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Looks like two stars collided and exploded.



posted on Jul, 13 2016 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Really? How stupid. I've had dreams of a spacecraft that could use the power of light to push it through space at light speed.



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